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Battened down the hatches yet?


Dizzy
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Well local schools and colleges closed early today due to the severe weather warning :shock:

 

Just looked on the met office web site and doesn't seem to bad for round here so what's the panic and not much going on outside at the moment :?

 

Over cautious maybe due to last times nightmare..... or will I be eating my own words later :shock::lol:

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Battened down the hatches? I've done better than that, I've left my ship on the Humber (in the safe hands of the brave Captain Cornelius) and come home :shock::shock::shock:

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I was just about to post that it seemed to have missed us... until I went out to my car that is. Flippin' heck it's a bit breezy eh....:shock::shock:

 

Aren't dark nights and double glazing wonderful... we can't hear or see a thing from inside :lol::wink:

 

Don't recon the piles of states and ridge tiles that are piled up one of the neighbours roofs will stay there for long though :roll:

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Forecast for Warrington is only force 6 overnight but I suspect we've been getting stronger gusts.

 

Just looked up force 6 Vic and the description is

 

Force 6 - Strong breeze 25?30 mph

Long waves begin to form. White foam crests are very frequent. Some airborne spray is present.

wave height 9?13 ft

 

Large branches in motion.

Whistling heard in overhead wires.

Umbrella use becomes difficult.

Empty plastic garbage cans tip over.

 

 

Bill if the speeds have hit 100 mph like you say then that means it's hurricane force :wink::shock::lol:

 

Hurricane-force ≥ 73 mph

 

Huge waves.

Sea is completely white with foam and spray.

Air is filled with driving spray, greatly reducing visibility.

wave height ≥ 46 ft

 

Very widespread damage to vegetation.

Some windows may break;

mobile homes and poorly constructed sheds and barns are damaged.

Debris may be hurled about.

 

I think Vic is closer to the mark there but like he says maybe a bit stronger than a 6 :wink::lol:

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You are correct Dizzy, but when they forecast and report the wind force they are taking the average, but you can get damaging gusts several knots higher than the mean. So with a gale force wind of average 35 knots you can get gusts twice that. :shock:

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Hey Asp, we do mph on land. :roll:

 

The Beaufort Scale of wind speeds was thought up by Admiral Beaufort who, being a seaman, used knots rather than mph.

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well it is still a tad blowy this morning. not quite as bad as last night though.

 

at one point thought i was in one of those silly horror films, wind whistling through the phone lines and a herd of wheely bins wandering down the road like demented dalek wannabes

 

not noted any trees down on sankey valley yet but only went a short walk with the dog this morning. might have a wander over the other side later and see if i can grab a bit of firewood for the woodburning stove :?

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We've got little bits of brick covering our back yard today... presume they must have blown of the chimney stacks :shock:

 

At least no full ones blew down eh :lol:

 

Neighbours piles of tiles on the roof didn't move.... now that has suprised and pleased me :D

 

So all in all not too bad eh :lol:

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All About Knots

 

 

The 'Chip Log' apparatus consisted of a small weighted wood panel that was attached to the reel of rope, and a time measuring device: a half-minute sand glass,the Chip Log Rope had knots tied at equal distances along the reel. Sailors would throw the wood panel into the sea, behind the ship, and the rope would start unwinding from the reel. The faster the ship was moving forward the faster the rope would unwind. By counting the number of knots that went overboard in a given time interval, measured by the sand glass, they could tell the ship's speed. In fact that is the origin of the nautical speed unit: the knot.

 

1 knots = 1.15077945 mph

 

Conversion table for

knots to miles per hour

 

5 Knots = 5.8MPH

10 Knots = 11.5MPH

15 Knots = 17.3MPH

20 Knots = 23.0MPH

25 Knots = 28.8MPH

30 Knots = 34.6MPH

35 Knots = 40.3MPH

40 Knots = 46.1MPH

45 Knots = 51.8MPH

50 Knots = 57.6MPH

55 Knots =63.4MPH

60 Knots = 69.1MPH

65Knots = 74.9MPH

70Knots = 80.6MPH

75Knots = 86.4MPH

80Knots = 92.2MPH

85Knots = 97.9MPH

90Knots = 103.7MPH

95Knots = 109.4MPH

100Knots = 115.2MPH

105Knots = 121.0MPH

110Knots = 126.7MPH

115Knots = 132.5MPH

120Knots = 138.2MPH

125Knots = 144.0MPH

130Knots = 149.8MPH

135Knots = 155.5MPH

140Knots = 161.3MPH

145Knots = 167.0MPH

150Knots = 172.8MPH

 

Beaufort Wind Scale

Windspeed in MPH Visible Condition

0 Calm smoke rises vertically

1 - 4 Light air direction of wind shown by smoke but not by wind vanes

4 - 7 Light breeze wind felt on face; leaves rustle; ordinary wind vane moved by wind

8 - 12 Gentle breeze leaves and small twigs in constant motion; wind extends light flag

13 - 18 Moderate breeze raises dust and loose paper; small branches are moved

19 - 24 Fresh breeze small trees in leaf begin to sway; crested wavelets form on inland water

25 - 31 Strong breeze large branches in motion; telephone wires whistle; umbrellas used with difficulty

32 - 38 Moderate gale whole trees in motion; inconvenience in walking against wind

39 - 46 Fresh gale breaks twigs off trees; generally impedes progress

47 - 54 Strong gale slight structural damage occurs; chimney pots and slates removed

55 - 63 Whole gale trees uprooted; considerable structural damage occurs

64 - 72 Storm very rarely experienced; accompanied by widespread damage

73+ Hurricane devastation occurs

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Very good Algy, I'm impressed by your investigative powers. A nautical mile is longer than a land (statute) mile by a variable amount depending on where you are on the globe. This is because the nautical mile is equal to the arc subtended on the earth's surface from the centre of the earth by 1 minute of latitude. If the earth were a perfect sphere then a nautical mile would be the same wherever you are on earth. Sorry but it isn't, it's an oblate spheroid. For practical purposes a nautical mile is taken to be 6080 feet compared to a land mile which, as every one knows, is 5280 feet, about 15% less. Does that help you land lubbers Peter? :lol::lol::lol::lol:

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Easy way to convert from knots to miles per hour.

 

1 knot is 1.15 mph.

 

In other words to convert from knots to mph, take the number of knots, add 10% (you can do that in your head no problem), then add another 5% (half of the 10% you just worked out).

 

Simples!

 

A similar trick works for VAT at 15%, 17.5% or 20%.

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