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Why do we blame the Americans for Halloween.


algy
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Why do we blame the Americans for introducing Halloween to this country!.

 

Halloween's Origins

 

The word Halloween is derived from the term "All Hallows Eve" which occurred on Oct. 31, the end of summer in Northwestern Europe. "All Saints Day," or "All Hallows Day" was the next Day, Nov. 1st. Therefore, Halloween is the eve of All Saints Day.

 

Apparently, the origins of Halloween can be traced back to ancient Ireland and Scotland around the time of Christ. On Oct. 31st, the Celts celebrated the end of summer. This was important because it was when animal herders would move their animals into barns and pens and prepare to ride out the winter. This was also the time of the crop harvests. This annual change of season and lifestyle was marked by a festival called Samhain -- pronounced 'sow-ane' and means 'end of summer.' Sow rhymes with cow.

 

There was much superstition associated with this time of change including the belief in fairies, and that the spirits of the dead wandered around looking for bodies to inhabit. Since the living did not want to be possessed by spirits, they dressed up in costumes and paraded around the streets making loud noises to confuse and frighten the spirits away. In addition, the new year began for the Celts on Nov. 1. So, the day of Samhain was believed to be a day that was in neither the year past or the year to come. Since it was in between, chaos ruled on that day. Often, people would pull practical jokes on others as a result.

 

Later, around the 5th century, as the Catholic Church developed and moved into the area, instead of adding a new day to celebrate, it took over the Samhain celebration. Nov. 1st became "All Hallows Eve" where all the saints of the Catholic church were honored. A later custom developed where people would go door-to-door on Nov. 2, requesting small cakes in exchange for the promise of saying prayers for some of the dead relatives of each house. This arose out of the religious belief that the dead were in a state of limbo before they went to heaven or hell and that the prayers of the living could influence the outcome. This may have been the precursor to Trick-or-Treat.

 

The Jack-O-Lantern apparently comes from Irish folklore about a man named Jack who tricked the devil into climbing a tree. Once the devil was in the tree, Jack carved a cross on the trunk, preventing the devil from coming down. The devil then made a deal with Jack not to allow Jack into hell after Jack died if only Jack would remove the cross from the tree. After Jack died, he couldn't go to hell, and he couldn't go to heaven. He was forced to wander around the earth with a single candle to light his way. The candle was placed in a turnip to keep it burning longer. When the Irish came to America in the 1800's, they adopted the pumpkin instead of the turnip. Along with these traditions, they brought the idea that the black cat was considered by some to be reincarnated spirits who had prophetic abilities.

 

So, it appears that the origins of Halloween are a mixture of old Celtic pagan rituals superstition and early Catholic traditions.

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... which have been distilled in the USA, then exported back to us; having lost any of it's original primitive meaning and turned into a comercial opportunity for the retail trade. :wink:

I agree with you entirely obs, however we have done a pretty good job with other festive occasions such as Christmas, New Year, Nov 5th., Easter and so on!. :wink:

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How times change and how we change with time as well.

 

Last night I was the Grim Reaper again but this time without the mask that literally petrified the kids last year. We ate pumpkin soup and biscuits shaped like bats then set fireworks off for the kids. On the way home, I thought back to the time when I was that young and I couldn’t remember anything about Halloween.

 

Interestingly, I do recall though that when it came to setting off fireworks, if bonfire night were ever to fall on a Sunday then it was customary to have the bonfire on either the Saturday or the Monday thus respecting the Sabbath. Back then there were always just a few who did set off their fireworks on a Sunday and I used to think how insensitive it was but there I was last night setting mine off. :mellow:

 

On a slightly lighter note, my 10-month-old grandson was sitting precariously on the edge of the settee all dressed up in a vampire suite complete with cape. He started to fall and instinctively I moved my leg to stop him falling but all I managed toto was to bump him in the mouth make him bleed. He cried a bit but soon was laughing just as much as everyone else as we’d turned him into a proper Count Dracula with real blood.

 

 

Bill :)

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How times change and how we change with time as well.

 

Last night I was the Grim Reaper again but this time without the mask that literally petrified the kids last year. We ate pumpkin soup and biscuits shaped like bats then set fireworks off for the kids. On the way home, I thought back to the time when I was that young and I couldn’t remember anything about Halloween.

 

Interestingly, I do recall though that when it came to setting off fireworks, if bonfire night were ever to fall on a Sunday then it was customary to have the bonfire on either the Saturday or the Monday thus respecting the Sabbath. Back then there were always just a few who did set off their fireworks on a Sunday and I used to think how insensitive it was but there I was last night setting mine off. :mellow:

 

On a slightly lighter note, my 10-month-old grandson was sitting precariously on the edge of the settee all dressed up in a vampire suite complete with cape. He started to fall and instinctively I moved my leg to stop him falling but all I managed toto was to bump him in the mouth make him bleed. He cried a bit but soon was laughing just as much as everyone else as we’d turned him into a proper Count Dracula with real blood.

 

 

Bill :)

 

Bill you marked the occasion a day early - Pumpkin soup is tonight and so are the pesky trick or treaters!

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.....pesky trick or treaters!

 

Gary don't be such a GRUMP :evil::P

 

It's great and I've had sooooo much fun this afternoon doing pumpkins and making my garden into a graveyard.

 

I've been covered in pumpkin goo..... then covered in paint and permenant marker pen... fought with saw that wouldn't cut straight... the kitchen is trashed....BRILLIANT FUN :D

 

...and I'm sat here with spiders and colourful oddities in my hair and my face painted.

 

Ok so my other two have gone out and left me too it with a strange look on their faces which sort of says "she's clearly lost the plot again, bless her". :lol:

 

I love it and it's great to see all the little local kiddies dressed up and having fun and they are all so very polite (so far).

 

I just hope he bigger more troublesome ones don't come later and spoil it all again by being <you know whats>. They may find themselves with a tombstone or rat shoved up their <you know where's> if I catch them :shock::evil:

 

One thing I don't agree with though is parents allowing their young kids to come round unsupervised. That is NOT good IMO for their own safety !

 

Anyway.. must go and check my make-up and refil the treat bowl.

 

Happy Halloween everyone :D

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I'm afraid so Peter as alas wrinkles, frowns and big dark circles and bags under the eyes do not come naturally to all of us you know :wink:

 

 

 

:D:P :razz: :P

The reason being in answer to the question/topic, is that they screw everything up, and then rewrite history to airbrush everybody else out.

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....ahh but in addition to airbrushing people out you can also airbrush people in if you have more than one 'image' open and available, not to mention of course cloning more of the same anywhere you like :wink:

 

Apart from all that.... History is what we make it (figure that one out) :wink:

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Dizzy.....

 

I get mine every year from the farm on the A57 on the way to Warburton Bridge. If you get to the Mercedes dealers on the M6 roundabout at Woolston, head down the A57 and about 400 yards on the right hand side there is a farm that sells them.

 

They had huge white or orange ones for £2.00 and the soup and cakes my missus made were fantastic!!

 

Don't bother with the rip off supermarket pumpkins!

 

And Dracula is "The Count" from sesame street!

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