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Beds in sheds -


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Noticed (on the news), the Gov are funding a crack-down on the slum landlords, who are exploiting illegal immigrants at rates of £200pw for a bed in a shed. Where do these illegals get the money from to pay these rents? Next minute, the reporter is standing under a M/way bridge, showing an array of bedding - saying, the crackdown is driving immigrants onto the streets. Hang on a minute, I thought the idea was to drive them to the Airport?! Then the Gov have withdrawn rights for a University to intake foreign students, many of whom can't even speak English! Then the PC reporter comes out with, these "students" spend money over here - well, on that basis, we might as well let the rest of the world in. :angry:

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So out of a full post about a news item on TV: YOU dwell on one word - "many". Point is - there shouldn't be ANY, that can't speak English. imo - can't speak English = NO visa; I was going to add "read and write", but that would exclude a fair number (daren't say "many") of our own chavs! Notice you don't appear concerned as to how many actually attend lectures when they get here, or how many dissappear once they've arrived. Niether do you seem to wonder how "illegal" immigrants in slums can afford £200pw, or afford drugs or booze? No doubt, this was a PR stunt by the Ministers responsible, to show they are making an effort to fullfill their commitment to reduce illegal immigration, but no mention on the news item, as to what happened to the illegals they rounded up. :angry:

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Sid, that would apply if we were emigrating to a Country with a different language, but it's a matter for those Countries to deal with. Kije, I know your in denial and the facts don't suit your liberal luvvie picture, but unless BBC and ITV news are making it up - those are the facts. :wink:

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I would agree that people who move to a country to live or study should at least have a basic grasp of the language of that country in order to go about their daily lives..... Cleo has learned to speak Arabic because that is the main language of the country where she now lives (and I have great admiration as Arabic is a pretty damned difficult language for a Westerner to master as it does not use the Western alphabet)

 

However most peoples' experience from the UK of "foreign" is two weeks in Benidorm and a few words of Spanish to buy a few beers!

 

I have always tried to speak French when we go to France, but the big problem I've found is that the French chap normally starts speaking in English to me!

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I think one of the problems was created by the British colonial classes wanting to turn the globe pink which resulted in the residents of our overseas conquests qualifying for British passports when the Commonwealth came into being.I don't know if anyone saw the story about the soldier from Botswana whose British army career ends this month & who is liable to be deported because of a years old speeding offence.This man has fought all over the world for Britain but he can't become a citizen because of that great crime , but every parasitic & scrounging member of the underbelly of foreign society is welcomed with open arms !

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As to them not speaking English, The immigration people only checked student files, They did not speak to the students, so they might all be have adequate English, and it could be a failure on record keeping.

 

I see we are back on your favorate subject.

 

Obs if you did get your way and all the students went home what would you do about the black hole that would be left in all university budgets, would you volunteer some of your pension, or would it be down to current tax payers.

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He's clutching at straws again Baz: any objective observation of our so-called immigration policies, shows it to be an utter shambles, with an enforcement agency (UKBF), not fit for purpose with it's arms tied behind it's back. The university system in general, and this university in particular, clearly had management deficiencies with regard to visa issues. All that's required is a clear policy, efficiently organised and effectively enforced, EG: Visas to foreign applicants should be processed by our Embassies in the Country of application, and finalised by interview with the applicant, thus ensuring such things as ability to speak English and to be free of any contagious disease. Visas should be time limited for the purpose they are applied for, and individuals monitored to ensure their wherabouts at any given time, thus avoiding the tendency for them to dissappear. Any failiure to comply with the terms of the visa, should result in immediate arrest and deportation. Sorted! :angry:

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Obs if you did get your way and all the students went home what would you do about the black hole that would be left in all university budgets, would you volunteer some of your pension, or would it be down to current tax payers.

 

Any so called university which is issuing visas to large numbers of foreign nationals without ensuring that they can speak the language their course is to be taught in or recording their attendance levels shouldn't just be stripped of its right to issue visas. It should CLOSE.

 

Thus saving the public purse several hundred ivory tower academics salaries.

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This university has NOT had its right to teach foreign students removed.

 

As a result of their failure to keep proper records and comply with UKBF rules, they've had their licence to issue visas themselves suspended. If they'd complied with the requirements of their licence they wouldn't have lost it.

 

They can still teach foreign students who've got their visas through the normal channels.

 

No business or organisation which fails in its statutory duties should escape being sanctioned.

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And lets be clear here.

 

We're not talking about the University of London here. We're talking about London METROPOLITAN University here, which is a small former polytechnic with a seriously troubled recent history of financial mismanagement, poor results, and massive under reporting of student drop out rates.

 

From Wikipedia -

 

"In July 2008 it was reported that a financial crisis was looming for the University. London Met had been misreporting data on student drop-outs for several years and, consequently, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) was proposing to claw back at least £15 million for the overpayment in 2008-9.

 

 

In February 2009 the figure of overpayment was revised to £56 million by HEFCE, who were seeking to recover the money.

 

 

On 19 March 2009, in response to the crisis, vice-chancellor Brian Roper resigned his position with immediate effect but continued to receive his salary until December 2009. Controversially, he received a series of bonuses during the period when the University was returning inaccurate data to HEFCE.

 

 

In May 2009 Alfred Morris, former vice-chancellor of the University of the West of England and University of Wales, Lampeter, was appointed interim vice-chancellor.[23]

 

The government announced in May 2009 that there would be an independent inquiry. It concluded in November 2009 and was reported to cast responsibility to Brian Roper, other senior administrators, and the Board of Governors. Following conclusion of the report, the chair of HEFCE called on "senior staff" and the entire Board of Governors to resign. After the deadline indicated by HEFCE chief executive Alan Langlands had passed, there were ruminations among staff and ministers that HEFCE could withdraw funding, effectively forcing the University to close.

 

 

A report commissioned by the University, published in November 2009, found that Roper had “the major responsibility and culpability” for the financial situation: Roper and some members of the executive were aware that the University had been applying its own interpretation of funding rules on student dropouts – rather than the funding council’s – since 2003, but took no action. The University’s board of governors and audit committee had an oversight role, which made them ultimately “accountable for a financial failure of this magnitude” and meant that they “must take overall responsibility”.

 

 

In early 2011, London Metropolitan University announced an overhaul of undergraduate education for students entering courses in 2012. This included a reduction in the number of courses from 557 to 160.

 

 

In the past, the University refused to participate in newspaper league tables. The new management reversed this policy and in the 2013 rankings (published in 2012), the University was placed only 118th in the Guardian University Guide.

 

 

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, London Metropolitan was ranked equal 107th out of 132 institutions by the Times Higher Education's RAE league table."

 

 

Looks like the place has been a shambles for quite some time! God only knows how they got given the right to issue visas in the first place!

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In that case they also should face sanction.

 

London Met had their licence suspended back in mid July, and the problems had been raised with them well prior to that.

 

"On the 16 July 2012 the UK Border Agency of the UK Home Office suspended the University's "highly-trusted status" with the Border Agency, a status required in order for the University to be eligible to sponsor both new student visa applications as well as existing student visas, for foreign students from outside of the European Union and the European Economic Area (or Switzerland). The University was one of three institutions to have such a status suspended.

 

On the 30 August 2012, the University's highly-trusted status was revoked.

 

The Immigration Minister, Damian Green, cited a number of reasons for the decision, including the discovery that more than a quarter of the students in the test sample did not in fact have the leave (permission) to remain in the UK, that the University did not have and could not provide sufficient proof of English-language proficiency standards for some of its students, and the fact that the University was unable to confirm the attendance of its students, in some 57% of the sampled cases."

 

This is not just a few isolated failures of record keeping. This is at best a complete shambles affecting the immigration security of the UK as a whole, and at worst the deliberate selling of UK visas without basic checks to anyone who wants one.

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