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On the Busses


Dizzy
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Before I quite rightly get my wrists slapped by you Algy   :wink:

 

Here are some old photos of busses travelling around Warrington in the late 40's to 60's.

 

Nice to see some of the old roads and shops from then

 

 

Market Gate 1969 

MarketGate19691024x728_zps109d1fb1.jpg

 

Bridge Foot 1950's

BridgeFoot1950s21024x712_zps5e06939d.jpg

 

Bridge Foot 1950's ? 

BridgeFoot1950s11024x714_zpsb7ae27b9.jpg

 

Bridge Foot 1965 

BridgeFootc19651024x823_zps94d50931.jpg

 

Bridge Street 1950's 

BridgeStreetc1950s1024x574_zpse21e4661.j

 

Wilderspool Depot 1962. New offices and workshops being built.

WilderspoolDepotc1962newofficeworkshops1

 

Buttermarket Street 1956 

buttermarketstreet19561024x853_zps04adf4

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Winwick Street 1960

WinwickStreet19601024x522_zpsc52f8788.jp

 

Buttermarket Street 1948

ButtermarketStreet194821024x568_zps218ba

 

Upper Bank Street 1948

upperBankStreet19481024x730_zpsbfb2d3d3.

 

Liverpool Road, Sankey Bridges. Flood (not sure of date)

LiverpoolRoadsankeybridgeflood747x1024_z

 

Buttermarket Street / Market Gate

ButtermarketandMarketGate1024x666_zps869

 

Buttermarket Street 1948

ButtermarketStreet19481024x700_zps1fbe35

 

Stockton Heath Village (A49 London Road)

StocktonHeathbus11024x562_zpsabccb6d2.jp

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Re the last one (Stockton Heath).

 

Does anyone have any idea roughly when that may have been taken? Perhaps the cars give a clue or something.

 

I'm intrigued to know what the small building bottom right with the wall and gate posts was and when it was there.

It is pretty much where the post office is today.

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Wonderful pictures and memories.  Anyone else on the forum actually stood on the island at Market gate - generally the preserve of gardeners and policemen? Do people remember the bus queues around Market Gate when it seemed the whole population  of Warrington  were going home from the town centre at peak times.(only 5 standing please - think it was 20 during the war)

 

What would health and safety have to say about the poor policeman on point duty at Bridge foot in picture 3?  Generally speaking they had white helmets and arm-bands, but not in the picture shown.

 

Happy days

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Glad they didn't have those when we used to jump on and swing off the old busses using the poles when they hadn't quite stopped Latchy. 

 

PS not forgotten about the other mag uploads you wanted. I lent then to one of my older neighbours to read thinking I'd have had them back the same day.  I haven't the heart to rush him.

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Glad they didn't have those when we used to jump on and swing off the old busses using the poles when they hadn't quite stopped Latchy. 

 

PS not forgotten about the other mag uploads you wanted. I lent then to one of my older neighbours to read thinking I'd have had them back the same day.  I haven't the heart to rush him.

Puts a whole new meaning to Pole Dancing  :lol:

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  • 1 year later...

Blimey Algy...if you'd left it another 3 days before replying to my question it would have been exactly 2 years since I asked it :lol: :lol:

Are you 100% sure it was the Spademakers Arms entrance as for some reason in my head I seem to recall it turning out to be a stonemasons or similar.   

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Acording to the write up (below) on dwellings on lower London Rd the last property on the left before Church Row, which looks to be a Chinese restaurant was the Spademakers Arms. Now whether the extended stonework on your bus photo is in front of that building I can't tell!.

In one of my previouse posts I think I said that the Spademakers had been where the Halifax used to be, I now now that is not correct as the article below cleary points out that it was the last property before the five cottages 12 - 20 London Rd.

 

spademakers_zpsncrk2iyi.jpg

 

spademakers%20arms%20site_zps3hyvrbze.jp

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Dizz, these answers were posted on th "Rootschat" site to my qurie regarding the Spademakers Arms, much of the information you will be aware of!.

Personally I now believe it was one of these "Beer Houses" set up in the front room of the houses to sell ale to the thirsty foundrymen, and had possibly been closed down before the 1841 census had been taken.

 

Replies from the “Rootschat” site regarding the ‘Spademakers Arms. Stockton Heath.

 

Ralph Brereton age 25 was an inn keeper in Stockton Heath in 1841.  The name of the establishment is not given, nor is the road, just Stockton Heath.
The next dwelling to the inn has a butcher.  The one recorded after has a spade maker's wife.  Several other dwellings also have spade makers recorded, including Richard Hamblett,  age 70, spade maker, with Robert age 50, and William age 30, also spade makers.

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Ralph Brereton age 25 was an inn keeper in Stockton Heath in 1841.  The name of the establishment is not given, nor is the road, just Stockton Heath.

Ralph Brereton was the inn keeper of the Red Lion according to a report in the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Saturday 18 March 1843.
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   Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser 19 December 1840  page 3
has a report of Thomas Guest beerseller of Stockton Heath being committed for trespass in pursuit of game at Warrington petty sessions.
The only Thomas Guest I can find on 1841 census for Stockton Heath is a gamekeeper there is a Joseph Hyde listed as a beerseller in 1841

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The Beer House Act 1830 allowed a householder, of reputable character, assessed to the poor rate, to retail beer and cider from his own house on payment of an annual fee to the Excise of 2 guineas. This Act opened the floodgates to a spectacular proliferation of decidedly downmarket drinking-dens, most of them in the front rooms of terraced houses. The Act was repealed in 1869. Theses beer houses are not normally shown on maps.

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This Act opened the floodgates to a spectacular proliferation of decidedly downmarket drinking-dens.

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Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser 30 April 1842  page 6.

While searching newspapers I came across a correction one local paper had made to a previous report where they said that the Hambletts were the celebrated spademakers of Stockton Heath. The correction said the two Hamblett brothers worked for a spade making factory, they were not the proprietors. They were charged with assault and robbery.
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Mary Guest (who is in same household as Thomas and of an age to be his mother) is on 1851 census age 80 in Stockton heath lodging with the Parry family. Her occupation is publican's widow, pauper. So maybe Thomas the beerseller in 1840 newspaper report was her husband and he had died before 1841 and the Thomas Guest in the census (gamekeeper) was their son.

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The report re Stockton Heath refers to the Red Lion but uses quotation marks for "Spademaker's  Arms" so perhaps it wasn't a licenced public house but more of a beerhouse as mentioned earlier or an informal name.

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The Factory was originally the business of the Hamblett family who sold out to Peter Caldwell in the mid 1880's. Maybe the confusion arose because the two miscreants had the same surname as the proprietor, but may or may not be related.

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