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Warrington Hospital?


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Just a few observations based on recent experience; which poses some questions about the state of health of our NHS: 1) with apparently only one triage nurse on duty in A&E at a night time visit and a waiting room full of patients; waiting times can be counted in hours rather than minutes. 2) If the option to by-pass this bottle neck is taken, by getting a GPs referral for admission, one discovers yet another waiting room full of patients in the Surgical Assessment Unit; and then discovers that the main medical criteria for admission appears to be the availability of beds, as demand appears to exceed supply. 3) Having hours to wait, one can spend time observing one's surroundings and note such things as a) the amount of time staff have to spend writing up reports, presumably to cover their backs and meet targets. And B) the hospital c/heating system was on full blast with folk complaining about the heat and then opening windows to let that expensive heat out of the windows. I'd like to believe that this personal snapshot isn't indicative of the general state of health of the NHS, but I fear it is.

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Just a few observations based on recent experience; which poses some questions about the state of health of our NHS: 1) with apparently only one triage nurse on duty in A&E at a night time visit and a waiting room full of patients; waiting times can be counted in hours rather than minutes. 2) If the option to by-pass this bottle neck is taken, by getting a GPs referral for admission, one discovers yet another waiting room full of patients in the Surgical Assessment Unit; and then discovers that the main medical criteria for admission appears to be the availability of beds, as demand appears to exceed supply. 3) Having hours to wait, one can spend time observing one's surroundings and note such things as a) the amount of time staff have to spend writing up reports, presumably to cover their backs and meet targets. And B) the hospital c/heating system was on full blast with folk complaining about the heat and then opening windows to let that expensive heat out of the windows. I'd like to believe that this personal snapshot isn't indicative of the general state of health of the NHS, but I fear it is.

 

Nothing serious was it Obs - not an  embarrassing accident involving a goat, a school girl outfit and an aubergine? .................................. I hope :lol:

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Sadly you are totally correct Obs. I had the misfortune of having to have an abscess lanced (something a normal GP would have done ten or so years ago) But after a very early morning trip to my doctors, it resulted in me being referred to W'ton SAU, where I arrived at 9.15 in the morning, and I was first there. Good, I thought, this shouldn't take long. Others arrived after me, some in great pain and distress, but it was almost two hours later, and after me making more enquiries, before a nurse came and handed us all information leaflets, explaining we would be there for "at least 4 hours"  What? I went to desk and explained I was only there for an abscess lancing and dressing, normally a five minute procedure. Then I was saw by a nurse, more form filling then a doctor saw me, but apparently he didn't do surgical work, he just wanted more information. A Dr degree in data research (?) He said I should return to waiting room and I could be attended to in "3 hours" This was now almost 12 noon. I had already been there for 3 hours. Could I go home and have lunch and return? No, I was told, I would lose my place! So they were asking me to spend at least 6 hours in a waiting room, with no food, and no drink. There were patients there who were in no state to wait around for any length of time, let alone 6 hours! I just walked out in disgust.  If I hear any politician from any party or indeed anyone spout on about how good the NHS is nowadays I would ask them what planet are they living on.  And the amount of time the staff spend form filling is just beyond belief. 

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Middlec, I'm sorry you've had a similar experience which is deeply saddening, as demand is likely to increase in the future and it's clear that the supply capacity to meet it isn't there. I agree with your point about GPs, they could certainly help with minor surgical procedures and hopefully relieve pressure on Hospitals.

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I'm pretty sure that the practice nurse at my local surgery does that sort of thing. (I'm talking abcess lancing here, not goats and aubergines!)

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It's not often I contribute to these debates, but I felt I should provide some "balance" here. I have visited A&E at Warrington twice within the space of a week, both times late at night.  On both occasions we were seen within 15 minutes. The staff were excellent, the facilities spotless.  Yes, we were there for some hours, but that was because of the seriousness of the condition, not because of a queue.

I understand people are not necessarily seen in the order in which they arrive, but are prioritised according to the seriousness of their condition.  We are continually being told not to go to A&E with trivial complaints so if we do so we cannot be surprised if we are kept waiting.

I think A&E have an excellent team who are doing a great job and I know other people who think the same.

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Agree Davy51, a picnic lunch, a portable t.v., plenty of cushions, a fan to keep cool (or a blanket to keep warm if they open the window) and most of all, a sense of humour. I have heard there are discussions afoot to alter the SAU system but of course, it needs staff and money throwing at it, so we won't hold our breath. I felt sorry for those who arrived after me in SAU, obviously in great distress and pain, who were expected to have to sit on a waiting room chair for hours before being seen. The system is totally wrong in that unit, and someone in authority should be standing up and shouting this.  ( DS- I have little experience of A&E, so I am glad you can report satisfaction on your visits there. What I am referring to is the Surgery Assessment Unit)

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It's called triage DS; sorting out medical priorities - but rather slow if done by only one nurse, who has to write up extensive notes following each case. A senior medical registrar would seem appropriate, to give a quick assessment and direct the case to the appropriate treatment centre asap (as in an Army casualty clearing station). But that still leaves the question of whether there are enough beds or surgical slots available.

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