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1. The Church Street Area.


algy
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1850. The building on the right next to the 'Bull's Head' is the dreaded Workhouse.

 

A report from Warrington, dated August 18th, 1729, noted that:

To my great satisfaction, I find in this Place a Workhouse, or House of Maintenance for the Poor finished, and many Poor already in it, pursuant to the Model you sent me 4 Years ago, which... was the Occasion of erecting this spacious Workhouse.

 

The workhouse, Warrington's first, had been erected on Church Street in 1728 and accommodated around 100 inmates. The rules of the house in 1820 included the barring of alcohol, no spitting or filth of any kind, no profane swearing, cursing or "obscene jests". There was also a ban on the "reading of songs, ballads, books or publications of an immoral tendency"

 

A parliamentary report of 1777 recorded workhouses at Warrington (for up to 100 inmates), at Cuerdley (50), and at Great Sankey (45).

 

Eden, in his 1797 survey of the poor in England, reported of Warrington that:

 

The Poor are maintained partly at home (188 out-pensioners, of whom 65 are men, 113 women, and the rest children), partly in a Workhouse, where there are 95 inmates (50 children under 9 years and the rest mostly old and infirm). They are employed in spinning hair for hair cloth, winding warp for sailcloth, etc. Half the heavy sailcloth used in the Navy was made here. Table of diet in the Workhouse: Breakfast—Sunday, pottage and butter milk, sweatened with treacle; Monday, Friday, bread and broth; other days, milk pottage. Dinner—Sunday, Thursday, broth beef and vegetables; Monday, thick pottage or hasty pudding; Saturday, butter milk and potatoes; other days, cold meat and potatoes. Supper—Sunday, bread and cheese; other days, boiled milk or milk pottage. It appears from the accounts published by the overseer and governor of the Workhouse that the following was the cost of the provisions per head per week for the following periods :

 

1st May, 1792, to 1st May, 1793 1s. 6¾d.

1st May, 1793, to 1st May, 1794 1s. 6d.

1st May, 1794, to 1st May, 1795 1s. 4d.

The Workhouse is an old one, but is kept very clean, and the Poor there seem very contented. The beds are filled with chaff, and are well provided with covering.

1850ChurchStreetThedreadedWorkhouseinChurchStreet.jpg

 

 

Warrington fair held in Church Street. In 1255 AD the town was given the right to hold a fair. The workhouse was demolished in 1851.

1855ChurchStreetFairtheoldWorkhousenearright001.jpg

 

1854. St Elphin's Parish Church, there has been a church of this name since 650 AD. A spire was added in the rebuild of 1859 to 1867 and is 281ft high.

1854AnearlyphotoofTheParishChurch.jpg

 

1858. St. Elphin's Parish Church with three ladies in their finery.

1858SaintElphinsParishChurchwiththreeladiesintheirfinery.jpg

 

1900. A horse-drawn bus outside the Cemetery Hotel.

1900Ahorse-drawnbusoutsidetheCemeteryHotel.jpg

 

One that slipped through, this should have been with the Buttermarket Street Photos, better late than never!.

1900ChurchStreet.jpg

 

1900. Staff of the Eagle printing works on Scotland Road.

1900EagleprintingworksScotlandroad.jpg

 

1900. The old half timbered house in Church Street, tradition has it that Oliver Cromwell stayed here, this is thought not to be correct, according to a local historian Mark Olly, Cromwell lodged next to this building occupied by another property of which the corner can be seen to the left of the photo.

1900TheoldhalftimberedhouseinChurchStreet.jpg

 

Church Street just before tram lines were installed.

1900searlyChurchStreet.jpg

 

Church street after tram lines had been laid, Ryland's wire works on the left, the site is now occupied by Sainsbury's store.

1900sChurchStreet001.jpg

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Look at how many gravestones there are! No wonder I couldn't find many of my ancestors there, so many stones have been moved.

 

Those 3 ladies are great - Wouldn't want to mess with the one in the middle!

 

There are hardly any there now Tracy. I remember you saying that you were researching your family history so I'm sure you know of this site, however just in case here is the web address of 'The Lancashire Online Parish Clerk Project':-

Marriages at St Elphin in the Parish of Warrington.

http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/Warrington/stelphin/marriages.html

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Thank for thinking of me Algy, I do use the online parish clerks quite a lot. It's a god send (is that irony?!) when you live away from the area you're researching like I do.

 

I also spent a fair amount of my last visit to Warrington scrabbling around St Elphin's looking for John Leigh's epitaph after seeing your thread about it on here.

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:unsure: Who is Ben? :blink::huh:

Cleo, everyone has heard of Bill & Ben the flower pot men!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben is the chap who penned the saying "Early to bed, early to rise"

Benjamin Franklin

US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer (1706 - 1790).

 

Happy now! Nosey. :wink::D :grin: :D

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They have been used to make paths around the church, a few are leaning against the Church wall and again a few in the grounds.

Visit Flickr

Graveystone walkway

 

nice patio idea that..... I wonder if Groundforce will take it on board!

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I counted 4 figures in the top picture as well, but perhaps one of them isn't a lady? :unsure: :unsure: :unsure:

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I counted 4 figures in the top picture as well, but perhaps one of them isn't a lady? :unsure: :unsure: :unsure:

There has always been four and I would say they were all female, although they do say that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder". :wink::D :grin: :D

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Re the 4 'ladies' on the St Elphins pic I recon the one on the far right (side view) is definately a bloke. Blimey 'he' even has a long white beard and dark glasses on :huh: and the one second from the left looks positively evil :shock:

 

I'm not looking at that pic again as it really gives me goosebumps. It's creepy and I feel a recurring and uneasy need to delete it :unsure::lol:

 

Other pics are great though Algy :D:wink:

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Cleo, everyone has heard of Bill & Ben the flower pot men!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben is the chap who penned the saying "Early to bed, early to rise"

Benjamin Franklin

US author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, politician, & printer (1706 - 1790).

 

Happy now! Nosey. :wink::D :grin: :D

 

Oh busy Ben who had a finger in so many pies! yes, happy now. You learn something new every day. Cheers Algy, me auld sage. :D

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Re the 4 'ladies' on the St Elphins pic I recon the one on the far right (side view) is definately a bloke. Blimey 'he' even has a long white beard and dark glasses on :huh: and the one second from the left looks positively evil :shock:

 

I'm not looking at that pic again as it really gives me goosebumps. It's creepy and I feel a recurring and uneasy need to delete it :unsure::lol:

 

Other pics are great though Algy :D:wink:

 

I know exactly what you mean Dizzy! It looks like the kind of photo where the photographer only noticed the ladies when the photo was developed ....

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