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Equipment plugs.


Peter T
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My current angst is plugs.

 

I recently purchased an 8 socket adaptor with power protection. I thought "well done Peter".

 

However, I unwrapped it and started plugging in as you tend to do. And guess what I could only use 5 (FIVE) of the sockets. :twisted::twisted::twisted::twisted:

 

The latest gimmick is to have the feed wire going in through the top of the plugs which means that you can't put another plug in opposite if the adaptor is 2 rows of 4, back to back.

 

WHY?????? make the plugs like this? :evil::twisted::evil::twisted:

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Diz normal plugs have the lead coming out where the two pins are and when plugged into a normal wall socket the lead hangs down.

 

A lot of power supply units that are made today have the lead coming out where the longer single pin is. so when they are plugged into a normal wall socket the lead comes out the top.

 

What peter has is one of those wide extension leads that have sockets either side with the single pin facing inwards. the result is when you plug a power supply in one side you cannot plug anything in opposite it as the outlet lead is in the way.

 

something like this.

 

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/9829031/Trail/searchtext%3EEXTENSION+LEADS.htm

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Thanks Evils... I understood what he meant about the extension socket I just didn't understand WHY he couldn't plug things into it.

 

I've never seen a plug/power supply unit where the lead comes out of the top hence my confusion :oops:

 

I'll no doubt be looking out for them now :lol:

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Well there's a first. I've never heard of a none standard standard 13 amp plug before. Are you sure about that Sid a thirteen amp plug where the cable comes out of the other end? :roll:

 

I think I know what Peter's on about where the cable from one socket obstructs another. In any case, plugs arn't always the same size which means on some cheaper extensions, you can't fit two or the slightly larger plugs next to each other.

 

 

Bill :)

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New one on me although maybe I have not got what your saying correct, to me a 'normal' 13 amp 3 pin plug to BS1368 has the cable exit from the centre between the live & nuetral pins, are you saying that the cable exits the opposite end by the earth pin? if so it's a new one on me. I must be confused as it is not possible. :shock:

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It is the transformer type plugs which have the cable entering at the earth pin end. I am looking at 6 in my power strip and a further 2 where the wire enters the traditional way.

 

I use 12 way power strip but the sockets are set at 45 degrees which means that the sockets do not obstruct each other.

 

You can also have a problem with a standard power strip if the transformer plugs are too wide. When that happens you can end up with just one socket used out of 3 because you have to put the transformer plug in the middle and it overlaps the ones either side

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Thanks SID for explaining it far better than I could.

Transformer sockets are one thing, but BT are now doing it in their phones. The BT Graphite being one that is causing me to whinge.

 

Does the angled one take all plugs regardless even if the cable comes out at the Earth pin end? (inc. transformer types)

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I assume Baz posted a link that advertised a 45 degree multi socket, if so, WHY?. :roll:

Sorry about the above post folks, I

it should have read:

I assume Baz posted a link that advertised a 45 degree multi socket, it has been deleted, if so, WHY?

the reason I posted that was because somehow I had'nt seen his picture of the angled plugs.

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Isn't it good when people who read posts don't actually read the posts.

 

from my first post centre paragraph.

 

 

A lot of power supply units that are made today have the lead coming out where the longer single pin is. so when they are plugged into a normal wall socket the lead comes out the top.

:roll::lol::lol:
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Isn't it good when people who read posts don't actually read the posts.

 

from my first post centre paragraph.

 

 

A lot of power supply units that are made today have the lead coming out where the longer single pin is. so when they are plugged into a normal wall socket the lead comes out the top.

:roll::lol::lol:

 

and there is a picture of a plug with the cable coming out of the "top" and also the bottom too!!

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Just had a scan around the stores and all they seem to have is the tower ones that take 10. They are also angled. I will have a look during the week.

 

I remember seeing those angled ones Baz a few years ago, but thought it was just the latest gimmick. The makers obviously knew more than the rest of us. :shock:

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Peter, the ones I have come out of computer cabinets so have about 10 or 12 sockets on them. Even the ones which aren't angled usually take any type of plugs because that is the way they are designed and the fact they cost a bit more than the 2.99 ones from IKEA!

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here you go:

 

2mhye4y.jpg

 

With this extension lead/socket would it make any difference at all if the power cables came out of the top or bottom of the plug and surely the degree angle doesn't make any difference???

 

Peter's sockets were in two rows parallel to each other whereas this one is just one row :?

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Dizzy,

 

look at the plug transformer which is on the left of my picture and see how far it extends past the socket.

 

Now look at this picture and see that if you put two of these together "head to head" they wouldn't fit as one would get in the way of the other

 

222388.jpg

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Errm... YES Baz I am not stupid you know.

 

The transformer type plugs in your original image would not work in one of these and yes this is the type Peter has bought.

 

But any moron with an ounce of sense would realise that the same transformer plugs with the wire coming out of the opposite end WILL work in the type of single layer extension socket/lead without the need for a picture of description but WILL NOT WORK in Peter's sort :lol:

 

It's hardly rocket science is it :lol:

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here you go:

 

2mhye4y.jpg

 

With this extension lead/socket would it make any difference at all if the power cables came out of the top or bottom of the plug and surely the degree angle doesn't make any difference???

 

Peter's sockets were in two rows parallel to each other whereas this one is just one row :?

The transformer low voltage cable in the picture cable has too much strain being placed upon it and could result in power failure at best or shorting out causing a fire at worst, I would recommend creating a bit of slack in it to remove the potential hazard, the other is bordering on the same situation. :shock: Possibility :wink:

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