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Warrington USA


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Hi there seem to be several Warrington's around the World.

I know of 3 Warrington's in the USA (Two in Philadelphia and one in Florida).

I wonder why they are called Warrington?

Any answers???

I think the two you quote as being in Philadelphia are the same place RC.

 

Warrington Township Pennsylvania was founded in October 1734, and is named after a town in Lancashire (now Cheshire), England. The early township consisted of four villages: Warrington, Neshaminy, Tradesville, and Pleasantville.

 

As of the 2010 census, the township was 86.3% Non-Hispanic White, 2.1% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American, 6.1% Asian, and 1.4% were two or more races. 4.2% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry. Much alike the rest of Bucks County, Warrington has seen a surge in its Indian and Mexican populations.

 

As of the census of 2000, there were 17,580 people, 6,124 households, and 4,807 families residing in the township.

 

Warrington Florida, is no longer a town and lost it's status in 1975, the place has only one outstanding claim to fame - the Naval Air Station Pensacola' (Wikipedia).

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There's another Warrington in Buckinghamshire, I drove through it once. Their wikipedia page has an explanation for the name but I imagine the reason is unique to that Warrington and doesn't necessarily apply to other towns of the same name.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrington,_Buckinghamshire

 

According to the Oxford Dictionary of Place Names (yes it's very nerdy to own such a book) our Warrington's name is derived from Old English and means a Farmstead or Village by a weir or river-dam.

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That's interesting Algy. I've read Charles Foster's book 'Capital and Innovation' recently and he suggests that quite a lot of American Pioneers were from the north west as protestantism was stronger here than in other parts of the country so there were more north westerners fleeing from religious persecution and seeking a new life elsewhere. 

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Think the original name was "Werrin(g)ton(?) - ton being the Saxon for Town, not sure what the "werrin" was? Sure you history buffs will find it?!

 

My previous post was

 

According to the Oxford Dictionary of Place Names (yes it's very nerdy to own such a book) our Warrington's name is derived from Old English and means a Farmstead or Village by a weir or river-dam.

 

 

Why Do I Bother?  :roll:

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For once I think that Renault Clio has posted the best response when she said that "Maybe they came from Warrington" or words to that effect.

That was exactly what I wanted to find out.

I have emailed the History Societies  of Warrington PA asking if they know if their Townships were named by emigrants from this small part of the "Old World".

Wouldn't it be extremely interesting to find that Henry Smalling (for example) from Bewsey or Dallam was the first person to build a home in this wilderness and name his homestead after his native town.....Warrington?

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The website for Warrington PA  http://www.warringtontownship.org/townshiphistory.cfm states that;

 

 

"Warrington Township was founded in October 1734, and is named after a town in Lancashire, England. The early township consisted of four villages: Warrington, Neshaminy, Tradesville, and Pleasantville ......"

 

Note to all you Cheshire lot " ..in Lancashire..."

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For once I think that Renault Clio has posted the best response when she said that "Maybe they came from Warrington" or words to that effect.

That was exactly what I wanted to find out.

So how did Dildo Island in the Canadian province of Newfoundland get it's name ?

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RC. I'm not disputing that the answer that you were looking for was the one that Cleo gave, BUT DON'T YOU BLOODY WELL READ ALL THE REPLIES!.

This was in my first reply - "Warrington Township Pennsylvania was founded in October 1734, and is named after a town in Lancashire (now Cheshire), England" for goodness sake man how many Warrington's are there in Lancashire?. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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Here's the reply they put about the link between the 2 Warringtons:

 

"We do not have record of a direct link, but this area was settled primarily by Quakers and I believe that there is a Quaker religious group in Warrington England. William Penn promoted freedom of religion for the English Quakers in his Pennsylvania land grant and so many traveled here to resettle and prosper. The Quakers were very active in the "underground railroad" in our area. This network of concerned citizens assisted many escaped slaves from the south on their journey north by hiding and feeding them while they made the connection for the next leg of their difficult journey - many ended up in Canada."

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