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Brexit's losers -

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observer    587

Seems the Institute for Economic Affairs (admittedly an alleged right wing think tank); has declared that the PM is right to say "No deal is better than a bad deal", and that reversion to WTO rules on tariffs, would injure the EU as well as the UK.   So perhaps it's time to abandon the negotiations designed to punish the UK, and walk away ?     :ph34r:

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observer    587

Well, as we all guessed, Labour is now selling out on the referendum decision, by wanting to stay in the single market, which will mean a continuation of "free movement". No doubt they'll include the customs union and the ECoJ  in their surrender plans; which will mean we won't leave the EU, but remain part of it (like Norway), without any political influence in the EU parliament, but still paying in £billions for the privilege.   What a complete shower of yellow rats.       :ph34r:

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Davy51    232

Not to forget that any such moves would leave any future Labour government with an easy route back to full membership with seats on the gravy train & possibly mandatory membership of the Euro as a condition of rejoining.

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asperity    266

But on the other hand it would scupper any plans they have for re-nationalisation of anything.

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Evil Sid    226

given the scare tactics of the EU if Britain leaves the EU, then to me the main brexit losers seems to be the EU itself.

If leaving was going to be so bad for Britain, then why are the EU trying so hard to keep us in?

The French people are only in the EU when it suits them, certainly the French farmers seem that way. Don't like an EU mandate, blockade the ports.

They are worried that Britain leaving and then having a boom in it's economy will encourage other EU members to leave.

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observer    587

Exactly Sid: and it's time our negotiators grew a pair and started laying the law down to these EU shysters.   No deal really is better than a bad deal, and a bad deal is all that the EU want to inflict on us. So just walk away and batten down the hatches for some shared pain.  If the EU realise they are going to feel the pain too, maybe they'll regain some reason.        :ph34r:

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Davy51    232

As a major player ,stakeholder & benefactor of this organisation Britain should take the high ground & give these Euro meisters a take it or leave it offer. Like pulling a tooth ,a short sharp remedy is the best option & any hurt will soon begin to fade as the UK makes its way in the big wide world once more.

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It seems that for one commodity, New Zealand lamb, the UK take 40% of what the EU have agreed to import. So in perspective, out of all the lamb imported into the EU's 28 countries, our small country use 40% of it all. It would be interesting to see the figures for Prosecco, Irish mushrooms, German cars, Polish blueberries etc.

Someone is going to miss us when we leave.

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Togger1    2
39 minutes ago, T F and the Wire said:

It seems that for one commodity, New Zealand lamb, the UK take 40% of what the EU have agreed to import. So in perspective, out of all the lamb imported into the EU's 28 countries, our small country use 40% of it all. It would be interesting to see the figures for Prosecco, Irish mushrooms, German cars, Polish blueberries etc.

Someone is going to miss us when we leave.

Italian Prosecco, Irish mushrooms,German cars and Polish blueberries aren't imported into the EU.

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observer    587

No, they're imported from the EU into the UK, which makes the point, that the EU will lose a big market if they persist in trying to punish us.  As for goods going into the EU from outside, which presumably pay WTO import tariffs; it doesn't seem to affect wine from Chile, prawns from Madagascar, or indeed cars from S/Korea and Japan, all of which are available in the UK, which is still part of the EU.   

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Davy51    232

Let us also not forget that we once had  thriving farming & fishing  industries that can be re-awakened once we leave the EU & in a few years our farmers will become exporters to Europe & countries further afield.

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observer    587

Seems the EUrocrats have been "flabbergasted" by the latest British rebuff of their arrogant demands.   Just as in 1940, they are discovering the British bulldog still has teeth, even though most of it's pups may still have milk teeth.  Their attempts to bleed the UK cash cow dry, will hopefully be driven off, and they can get used to the idea, that their second biggest donor is now leaving, without paying a penny in Dane geld, into their corrupt coffers.      :ph34r:

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observer    587

Notice Barnier said "the clock is ticking" and his drinking partner Junkers keeps claiming the talks are running out of time. Well hang on a minute, if time is of the essence, why are they only meeting for one week in every month?      :ph34r:

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Bazj    493
32 minutes ago, observer said:

Notice Barnier said "the clock is ticking" and his drinking partner Junkers keeps claiming the talks are running out of time. Well hang on a minute, if time is of the essence, why are they only meeting for one week in every month?      :ph34r:

because for the other three weeks of the month, they have to barrack each other and make snide comments

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asperity    266

Of course it isn't the "chief negotiators" who are doing the work, they are just the frontmen. It's the battalions of civil servants who are doing the legwork 24/7 on both sides. You all knew this of course? :unsure:

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observer    587

Well who'd have thought it, all those civil servants that we've been told about on the news for the last two years.   But they don't make the decisions or agreements or lay down conditions on the process.  Mr Stuka is now criticising David Davis, which is a good indication that Davis is doing a good job for us. It's clear that the EU Mandarins are panicking at the thought of losing 20% of their budget and getting 3 million of their citizens back to claim dole and other benefits. They are still hoping that the 5th column in Parliament (LIB/Labs) will scupper the deal and all the toys can be put back neatly into the box.     :ph34r:

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