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Remembering 14 Sept 1940 ?


Dizzy
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Obs mentioned the bomb that fell during WW2 on the Thames Board Fete that killed and maimed many people, some just young children, in his post about WW2 on here a few days ago.

Tonight I saw a photo of the plaque that remembers all those poor souls on the 'Warrington Photos Warrington Born' facebook page too and with the reminder that next week, Monday 14th September , is the 75th anniversary of that tragic and awful day.

It is said to have been one of  the worst Warrington’s Wartime atrocities, "coming without warning on a fine Saturday afternoon and targeting innocent families enjoying a fete on Thames Board Mill’s recreation Ground"

I quote the museum website, I hope they don't mind, which says

“Bomber Kills Women, Babies,” reported the local press. “Mothers and tiny babies were among the helpless civilians killed by a lone German raider who swooped down upon them in a North-West town. They were attending a Spitfire gala in a recreation club when the bomber dived without warning and released two bombs.  One completely wrecked the light wooden club… two families were partly wiped out, members of others lie in hospital gravely wounded. It was all over in seconds… but dead, dying, injured and a mass of mangled debris were the pitiful aftermath which this Nazi bomber left behind as, immediately he swept back into the skies and vanished.”

Later there were many conflicting eyewitness accounts from those who had seen the plane swoop over the town, but most agreed that the pilot was low enough to see exactly what he had bombed. The Warrington Fire Officer’s log reported, however, that German radio reports that evening claimed that the Aluminium Mills at Bank Quay had been bombed."

direct link to their page here http://www.warringtonmuseum.co.uk/local-history/warrington-at-war-1939-45/

Here is a photo I took of the memorial plaque on the site which is now a lovely lake and landscaped area a little while ago.  I wonder if any sort of remembrance is being planned for the 75th anniversary next week even if it's just the silent laying of a wreath or perhaps some flowers by individuals like me who care and do remember even though I wasn't even born then.

It's surprising just how many local people don't even know about the bomb that dropped there or even the memorial :(


centre%20park%20plaque%20%20thames%20boa
 

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A dark and terrible day in the history of Warrington.

 

The bomb crater  on the field on the 14th September 1940.

14th%20Sept%201942_zps1mvyld2o.jpg

 

 

 

Canteen staff trying one of the games out prior to the tragic event.

thames_board_bombing_1940_2_zpsbzhkjdnn.

 

 

The people and children who died as a result of the heinious act.

 

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Algy seeing those photo's and all the casualties names listed along with their ages, where they lived and who their families were brought tears to my eyes. 

I think it would be fitting if another plaque was put up there showing their names and ages so that they are always remembered by the people of Warrington and others who may visit the lake site.

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I just found this online for one of the casualties names on Algy's list.  :(

 

 

 

Beatrice Hannah (Mrs) Parker

 

Rank: Civilian

 

Name of Rgt or Ship: Civilian

 

Died:

 

Age: 34

 

How Died: Killed in Air Raid

 

Country of burial:

 

Grave Photo: Yes

 

Cemetery or Memorial: Altrincham (Hale) Cemetery

 

Town Memorial: Sale

 

Extra Information:

 

Born during the September quarter 1906 in the Bucklow R.D. - ref: 8a/187,

the daughter of Frederick & Ada Louisa Walker, later of 104 Stamford Park

Road, Hale.

 

She married Robert Parker during the March quarter 1932 in the Bucklow R.D.

- ref: 8a/335 and they resided at 72 Woodheys Drive, Sale. - they had no

children.

 

Beatrice was the Canteen Manageress at Thames Board Mill in Warrington when

the Town was bombed. At 17.05 hours on the 14th September 1940, a lone

raider dropped two H.E. bombs on the Recreation Ground of the Thames Board

Paper Mill, where a garden fete was in progress. One bomb fell on the

Canteen and 150 people were buried in the wreckage, of these 16 were killed

(including six employees), fifteen others were seriously injured and 28

slightly injured.

 

This was Warrington's worst Wartime atrocity, coming without warning on a

fine Saturday afternoon and targeting innocent families enjoying a fete on

Thames Board Mill's recreation Ground. "Bomber Kills Women, Babies,"

reported the local press. "Mothers and tiny babies were among the helpless

civilians killed by a lone German raider who swooped down upon them in a

North-West town. They were attending a Spitfire gala in a recreation

club when the bomber dived without warning and released two bombs. One

completely wrecked the light wooden club......two families were partly

wiped out, members of others lie in hospital gravely wounded. It was all

over in seconds.....but dead, dying, injured and a mass of mangled debris

were the pitiful aftermath which this Nazi bomber left behind as,

immediately he swept back into the skies and vanished."

 

Beatrice was buried on the 11th October 1940 in Altrincham (Hale) Cemetery

- Burial No. 10,697.

 

Commemorated on the private family gravestone in Hale Cem.

 

Her mother, Ada Louisa died 11/05/1931 aged 61 years. Her brother, Sydney

Frederick Parker died on active service in the 1st W.W. See Altrincham

1st W.W. Database.

 

Direct link there 'Trafford War Dead' http://www.traffordwardead.co.uk/index.php?sold_id=s%3A11%3A%2217%2Csale_ww2%22%3B&letter=&place=sale&war=II&soldier=Parker

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It's at the lake just near the Village Hotel Tracey.  From Brian Bevan Island you go over the blue bridge, turn left as if you are going to the hotel but instead of turning into their car park go straight on and the lake is behind the trees.  It's a lovely place for a walk round.

 

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The first name on the list was a little boy named Donald Ackerly who lived across the road from us in Oldham Street, I don't remember him as I was only four months old when it happened but I did go to school with his sister Dyllis, they were a lovely family, she also never knew her brother.

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Little William Stanley Reynolds was the son of my dads mate (called Stanley William!). They lived in Evelyn Street and old stan was my dads mate when they were at school and they both worked at Crosfields.... Stan and his wife pulled the body of their son out from the carnage. Old Stan was a lovely man too, I met him many times in Crosfields club

 

RIP

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How awful :(  I never imagined that so many on here would have actually known the families who lost people that day.

Was your dads friends little boy named after your dad Baz ?  More tears to my eyes when I read they had to pull the body of their son out of the carnage and then they lost their daughter too.  

Same for the  family and little girl you went to school with who you say never knew her brother Algy.

I hope Gary gets somewhere with his request to the council for some sort of acknowledgment of the 75th anniversary of that awful day. 

Either way I'm going to take some flowers down there, hopefully some of you will too. 
 

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