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algy

The Speed of Light.

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OK....What is the average speed of rain fall?

Too many variables Sue, wind speed, temperature, atmospheric pressure, size of droplets, viscosity of droplets, etc.

However here is the nearest you will get:-

The terminal velocity of a falling raindrop through still air depends on its size. An average raindrop is about 2 millimeters in diameter and has a maximum fall rate of about 14.5 miles per hour or 21 feet per second. A large raindrop, 5 mm in diameter, falls at 20 mph (29 feet/second), but drops of this size tend to fall apart into smaller drops. Drizzle, which has a diameter of 0.5 mm, has a fall rate of 4.5 mph (7 feet/second).

 

Read more: How fast does the average rain drop fall in mph? | Answerbag http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/37946#ixzz1Aa7vS2X5

:wink:

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I have heard it said that a raindrop bounces approx 9" when it hits the floor. This determines the height of your damp proof course in the outside wall, usuallly three brick widths up from the level of the flags.

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I would imagine that depends on the angle of the trajectory of the rain drop in relation to where the wall is situated. :roll:

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I have heard it said that a raindrop bounces approx 9" when it hits the floor. This determines the height of your damp proof course in the outside wall, usuallly three brick widths up from the level of the flags.

 

So what about the raindrops hitting the wall 27 bricks up. :?:?:?

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That is what always puzzled me Wolfie.

 

Going back to the 70's - 80's. It was then two brick widths up from the ground i.e 6" where the damp course was placed. And that came from a Clerk of Works. I'm sure there must be a reason for it, but I doubt if that was it. Never have been able to get me head around that one.

 

The same as digging a footing out. Dig down for 3' or until you reach clay.

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Yes it is supposd to stop rising damp Obs.

But the terraced houses along Manchester Road don't have any damp course what so ever. That's how they were built. And they don't have rising damp.

 

There has been a trane of thought for some years now, that there is no such thing as rising dmp.

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