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Private firms to patrol UK streets.


algy
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Private firms to patrol streets.

Plans are reportedly being considered which would see private companies patrol neighbourhoods instead of police

 

Police are poised to bring in private companies to investigate crimes and patrol neighbourhoods, it has been reported.

 

Two forces, West Midlands and Surrey, are asking security firms to bid for contracts, worth £1.5 billion over seven years, to run some services that are currently carried out by officers, according to the Guardian.

 

Successful firms would have a wide range of responsibilities, including detaining suspects and responding to incidents, but would not be able to arrest suspects.

 

In a briefing note sent to companies, which was seen by the newspaper, all services that "can be legally delegated to the private sector" are potentially up for contract. Administrative roles, such as legal services and managing forensics, are also set to be outsourced.

 

The move will spark fears about privatisation within the police force. Ben Priestley, Unison's national officer for police and justice, told the Guardian: "Bringing the private sector into policing is a dangerous experiment with local safety and taxpayers' money.

 

"We are urging police authorities not to fall into the trap of thinking the private sector is the answer to the coalition's cuts. The fact that the Home Office is refusing to publish its business case - even under FOI (Freedom of Information Act) - speaks for itself.

 

"Privatisation means that the police will be less accountable to the public. And people will no longer be able to go to the Independent Police Complaints Commission if they have a problem. When a critical incident happens, a force's ability to respond will be severely compromised. The only winners are private companies and shareholders who make profits at the expense of local services."

 

A West Midlands police authority spokesman told the newspaper: "Combining with the business sector is aimed at totally transforming the way the force currently does business - improving the service provided to the public. The areas of service listed in this notice are deliberately broad to allow the force to explore the skills, expertise and solutions a partnership could bring."

 

A Home Office spokesman said: "Private companies will not be able to arrest suspects, and they will not be solely responsible for investigating crime. Many forces already use the private sector to run custody suites so that officers can be deployed elsewhere.

 

"We support the police in considering the value of private sector partnering to achieve cost savings and better services for the public."

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Beat me to it Algy. It's like the government is legalising vigilanties. How do we know we can trust these private firms to get it right. Seems these days the police forces have a number rogue officers in the ranks. I can imagine it will be a damn site worse within the private firms. :unsure:

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What slightly puzzles me about it is the fact they are allowed to detain them but NOT allowed to arrest them. So they catch some little toe-rag climbing out of the back window of a house. They can get a grip off him/her/it but have to call the police to come and arrest him if they have somebody available. If the police do not have anybody available at the time how long would they be allowed to detain them before they had to let them go and would they then be liable to prosecution.

 

These adverts at the top of the page are getting good just lately. Am reading this topic and noted that the advert was

 

 

POLICE DATING uniform dating .com. had to smile. :D8)

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What slightly puzzles me about it is the fact they are allowed to detain them but NOT allowed to arrest them. So they catch some little toe-rag climbing out of the back window of a house. They can get a grip off him/her/it but have to call the police to come and arrest him if they have somebody available. If the police do not have anybody available at the time how long would they be allowed to detain them before they had to let them go and would they then be liable to prosecution.

I'm sure that at present security staff in shops are allowed to detain anyone suspected of shoplifting until the 'old bill' arrive. :unsure:
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I think it’s probably right for the police just like any other business faced with economic cutbacks to look at alternative ways to maintain its services. I’m also sure that the people that have come up with this have given a great deal more thought to the potential issues that might arise than we have and providing these are addressed, a good compromise could be probably be achieved. Maybe not an ideal solution but it’s a “needs must” situation where hopefully the outcome could be preferable to a reduction in services.

 

Bill :)

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What Chloe said. SID, the PCSO'S can't arrest either.

 

Who will pay for these people? Can't see them being cheaper than what we have got, so apart from being a stupid idea, we might as well stay as we are.

 

Privatising doesn't work.

What next, the NHS staff?

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