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algy
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Peter,

Original buildings in Bridge St. none on the left going up as the original buildings were knocked down in the widening completed in 1908 there are a few on the right, the Packet House, Royal Oak, seven Star'sand most continueing up the street until you arrive at Boots.

Glass making started in Warrington in the Roman era, however there were glass making furnaces in the town in 1772, the first named company was owned by a Peter Seaman who had a factory in the town in 1781, by 1828 there were eight glassmakers one being Robinson's glass works that closed in 1933, the area was taken over by Joseph Crosfield & Son Ltd.

Baz,

Regarding Bridge Street I'm sure its an optical illusion, if you look carefully the buildings are leaning back, pretty sure the gradiant of the hill has always remained the same.

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Peter,

Original buildings in Bridge St. none on the left going up as the original buildings were knocked down in the widening completed in 1908 there are a few on the right, the Packet House, Royal Oak, seven Star'sand most continueing up the street until you arrive at Boots.

Glass making started in Warrington in the Roman era, however there were glass making furnaces in the town in 1772, the first named company was owned by a Peter Seaman who had a factory in the town in 1781, by 1828 there were eight glassmakers one being Robinson's glass works that closed in 1933, the area was taken over by Joseph Crosfield & Son Ltd.

Baz,

Regarding Bridge Street I'm sure its an optical illusion, if you look carefully the buildings are leaning back, pretty sure the gradiant of the hill has always remained the same.

 

What type of camera did you use? :lol::wink:

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These photographs are so special, the boats at the glassworks is an astonishingly lovely image. My favourite up to now is still the Cross's shop, I absolutely admire the way that the photographer captured the eclectic nature of the shopfront and how the people are all blurred because of the long exposure he used (probably due to using plates etc) yet the items for sale and the building are nice and clear. Its like he has managed to capture the ephemerality of the peoples lives.

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