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past occupants of St Barnabas place


mint87
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would be intersted to hear of anybody who lived on our street and any stories etc, i find the human side of the history facinating

 

 

regards

 

mint

 

There's an interesting little peice here -

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/74/a2046674.shtml

 

Memories of someone evacuated from London to stay with the Paine family living at 9 St Barnabas Place during the war.

 

Copyright and acknowledgement : "'WW2 People's War is an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The archive can be found at bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar'"

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A fascintaing read and account Cleo and thanks for posting that. It must have been so very hard for the families and the children back then to be split up although in this case it seems that the children's evacuation saved both their and their parents lives.

 

I just added the copyright from the site (not really needed I suppose but better to be safe than sorry...)

I can't believe it though and like I said on your other topic about St Barnabas Place Mint... yet again "I hope TraceyB isn't reading " :lol:

 

Number 9 St Barnabas Place was home to a William Bennett (age 25) and his wife Mary Alice (age 24) in 1901 William was a 'Mechanical Fitter'

 

In 1911 it was home to a William and Florence James, their daughter Bessie (age 2) and their neice Bessie Newlow? (age 16). William was aged 28 and a 'Clerk - Wireworks'

 

I wonder if I should post all the other names and residents for 1901 and 1911 as you never know, someone else researching your road might pick up on the family names and be able to tell you more Mint B)

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A fascintaing read and account Cleo and thanks for posting that. It must have been so very hard for the families and the children back then to be split up although in this case it seems that the children's evacuation saved both their and their parents lives.

 

I just added the copyright from the site (not really needed I suppose but better to be safe than sorry...)

I can't believe it though and like I said on your other topic about St Barnabas Place Mint... yet again "I hope TraceyB isn't reading " :lol:

 

Number 9 St Barnabas Place was home to a William Bennett (age 25) and his wife Mary Alice (age 24) in 1901 William was a 'Mechanical Fitter'

 

In 1911 it was home to a William and Florence James, their daughter Bessie (age 2) and their neice Bessie Newlow? (age 16). William was aged 28 and a 'Clerk - Wireworks'

 

I wonder if I should post all the other names and residents for 1901 and 1911 as you never know, someone else researching your road might pick up on the family names and be able to tell you more Mint B)

Dizz, if you have time post them.

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thanks so interesting ours is 26, love the gather some info especially our house. cant imagain what it would have been like during the war

 

Mint, after having been brought up in a two up two down terraced house in Latchford during the 1940’s I can tell you life was less than luxurious, downstairs, a front room with access straight from the pavement, walk through and past the stairs and you were in the living room, heated by a black cast iron range with an oven, (no central heating), our kitchen was a corrugated lean-to shed built on to the back yard wall, a Belfast sink with a cold water tap, no running hot water, bath night meant going out into the back yard to bring in a galvanized tin bath that was hung up on the outside wall, hot water was boiled over the fire in the living room and you had your bath by the fireside, and as a youngster you didn’t hang about, especially in winter, it was in, quick bath, out and dressed or pyjamas on as required.

Upstairs was just the two bedrooms, no double glazing, no electric blankets, just a fire brick warmed up in the range oven, wrapped in a towel and placed in your bed, you would wake up on a cold winters morning with the bedroom window iced up on the inside, I would put an old penny in my mouth for a couple of minutes to warm it up then place against the ice on the window for a couple of seconds, when you took it off you had a round peep hole in the ice on the window.

The toilet was a bin toilet down the yard with a hole cut in the boards to sit on, when I was little, mum would give me newspaper to tear into squares , make a hole in the corner of each square, thread them on a piece of hairy string then that would be hung on a nail in the ‘bog’ down the yard and used as toilet paper, I thought it was heaven when one day she brought ‘Izal’ toilet paper home and I didn’t have to make any more ‘bog’ paper.

And that generally speaking was what life in our terraced house was like in the 1940’s.

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You lucky devil Algy, that was luxury living compared to Forster street(tongue in cheek). Never forget the summer smell of the toilet lorry on a Wednesday collection. We could write a book about the yard 'toilet'. Sat there in the dark singing and with foot against the door. Remember on a couple of occasions the air raid siren went when family members were in there. We changed the fly paper every month though.

 

Fascinating though in what you have written. To write like that must make the pain of it all seem like -

 

Happy days

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Mint, after having been brought up in a two up two down terraced house in Latchford during the 1940’s I can tell you life was less than luxurious, downstairs, a front room with access straight from the pavement, walk through and past the stairs and you were in the living room, heated by a black cast iron range with an oven, (no central heating), our kitchen was a corrugated lean-to shed built on to the back yard wall, a Belfast sink with a cold water tap, no running hot water, bath night meant going out into the back yard to bring in a galvanized tin bath that was hung up on the outside wall, hot water was boiled over the fire in the living room and you had your bath by the fireside, and as a youngster you didn’t hang about, especially in winter, it was in, quick bath, out and dressed or pyjamas on as required.

Upstairs was just the two bedrooms, no double glazing, no electric blankets, just a fire brick warmed up in the range oven, wrapped in a towel and placed in your bed, you would wake up on a cold winters morning with the bedroom window iced up on the inside, I would put an old penny in my mouth for a couple of minutes to warm it up then place against the ice on the window for a couple of seconds, when you took it off you had a round peep hole in the ice on the window.

The toilet was a bin toilet down the yard with a hole cut in the boards to sit on, when I was little, mum would give me newspaper to tear into squares , make a hole in the corner of each square, thread them on a piece of hairy string then that would be hung on a nail in the ‘bog’ down the yard and used as toilet paper, I thought it was heaven when one day she brought ‘Izal’ toilet paper home and I didn’t have to make any more ‘bog’ paper.

And that generally speaking was what life in our terraced house was like in the 1940’s.

 

Sheesh Alge, was like reading my own life history.

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wow not as rosey as i thought

 

You youngsters don't know you are born. :lol::lol::lol:

 

Life was hard after the war but there was also a lighter side, maybe because neighbours were more friendly and helped each other out, especially with the rationing. And in those days you didnt have to make sure windows and doors were all double locked like you have to do today.

We were so poor that burglers broke into our house and left us things. (joke)

But it wasn't a throw away society in those days like it is these days. It was mend and make do and hand-me-downs. No designer labels costing a small fortune either.

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I used to live on Forster St Harry, but about 50 years later than you! My Aunty also lived on Dudley St in the 80's. Handy for the chippy if nothing else :D

 

I've checked out the Barnabas Place Bennetts Dizzy and they're not mine. Luckily someone on ancestry.co.uk had already done their tree so it was easy to find.

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Did you check out the Bennetts in Goulden Street too Tracey? I think I spotted them in the house next on the census after Mint's road :P They were bakers.

 

Anyway back to Mints question before we have another topic going completely off on a tangent :oops:

 

Mint

 

 

1901 Census - 26 St Barnabas Place

 

Stanley FAIR, Head, Married, Male, Age 30, born 1871, occupation Glass Warehouse Clerk, born in Penketh Lancashire

 

Louisa M FAIR, Wife, Married, Female, Age 26, born 1875, no occupation listed, born in ?Litchmch? Derbyshire

 

Winifred M FAIR, Daughter, Female, Age 5, born 1896, born in Warrington

Lancashire

 

Percy R FAIR, Son, Male, Age 4, born 1897, born in Warrington

Lancashire

 

Clarice M FAIR, Daughter, Female, Age 3, born 1898, born in Warrington

Lancashire

 

 

 

1911 Census - 26 St Barnabas Place (incorectly transcribed St Barnabaas bur clear on orig)

 

Thomas WALL, Head, Married, Male, Age 44, born 1867, Occupation Wire Roller, born in Shopshire Kelley (incorectly transcribed as should be Shropshire as clear on orig)

 

Sarah WALL, Wife, Married - for 16 years, Female, Age 38, born 1873, no occupation listed, born in Shopshire Kelley (incorectly transcribed as should be Shropshire as clear on orig)

 

Samley WALL, Son, Single, Male, Age 15, born 1896, no occupation listed, born in Lancs Warrington

 

Thomas James WALL, Son, Male, Age 9, born 1902, occupation 'at School', born in Lancs Warrington

 

Doris WALL, Daughter, Female, Age 4, born 1907, born in Lancs Warrington

 

...... if you want copies of the original returns for your house send me a pm (personal message) with your email address in and I'll email them to you. The 1911 census returns are copies of the originals which were hand written by the occupant and are rather nice. 1901 are just the enumerators written returns but are interesting too.

 

.... if you search the 1911 census on 'Find my Past' be aware that St Barnabas Place has been incorectly transcribed quite a lot. I found it listed as St Bamabass, St Barnabus, St Barmaabas, and the Vicarage was hillarious as that's listed as St Banabas Vicoiagl :blink: I think the transcriber must have been drinking. :lol:

 

I've advised them of all the incorrect transcriptions for your road which they have agreed with but it takes a few months for them to actually update them.

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I've got full memberships with both 'Find My Past' and 'Ancestry'. :wink:

 

Ekk I hope my other half never reads that as he doesn't know that my obsession with my family research and local history is costing us money :unsure::lol:

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The Wall family lost two children from the records I've seen not the Fair's as far as I am aware Mint :wink:

 

Nothing on the 1911 census to show that the Fair's had lost any kiddies either but that's not saying they didn't, they might just not have wanted to remember or mention it in 1911.

 

They Fair's were living at 64a Hood Lane, Sankey in 1911 so had moved on from St Barnabas but nice to see their 3 kids as mentioned earlier are still with them and 10 years older.

 

Winifred M Fair (their daughter in the 1901 census) did switch her name around to Mabel W Fair by the 1911 census though. And who can blame her but I'm not sure which name is is worst... Winifred or Mabel :oops: I guess Winifred might have got shortened to Fred and that's not good if you are a girlie :lol:

 

By 1911 Winifred(now Mabel) and now aged 15 was working as a Confectioners Apprentice, Percy now aged 14 was working as an Office Boy and little Clarice now aged 13 was still at school.

 

One thing I have noticed from all my census reads over the past few years is that the majority of people did actually have jobs with some of the older widows noted as living on their own means (presumably having made money in their past jobs or getting an income through leases of land or property and the likes I guess.)

 

It's very rare see husbands or children over the age of 14 listed with NO occupations and the same for wives too in a lot of cases.

 

A far cry from some of today's society and it would be great to be able to see the census returns for say the last 20 years to compare but alas I'll be aged 136 (or is that aged 146?) before they become available.

 

BUGGER !!! That will frustrate me now as surely those of us with such obsessions and a need to know should be able to ask under a FOI request and/or a Human rights law. It must be against my human rights for me to be expected to spend the rest of my life knowing that the all the census info is there but will only be released way after I've popped my clogs. It will traumatise me for years and my family may also suffer.

 

I'll settle for the release of records upto 1951 though without taking it any further :wink:

 

Night all :oops:

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Winifred M Fair (their daughter in the 1901 census) did switch her name around to Mabel W Fair by the 1911 census though. And who can blame her but I'm not sure which name is is worst... Winifred or Mabel :oops: I guess Winifred might have got shortened to Fred and that's not good if you are a girlie :lol:

 

 

I would imagine more likely shortened to Winnie, the usual abreviation. :)

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