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Warrington Old Photos.4.


algy
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Many of these photograph?s may be available

from the Warrington Museum/Library and will

be of far superior quality to those viewed here.

1909WarringtonTownHallthevisitofKingEdwardVI.jpg

1909 WarringtonTownHall the visit of King Edward VI.

 

1909SankeyStreettheGuardianOffices.jpg

1909 Sankey Street the Guardian Offices

 

1909ChurchStreetpreparingforthevisitofKingEdwardVII.jpg

1909 Church Street preparing for the visit of King Edward VI.

 

1909ButtermarketStreetthearchthatneverwas.jpg

1909 Buttermarket Street, the arch that never was, this false arch was built to decorate Buttermarket Street for the visit of King Edward VI.

 

19096thJulyButtermarketStreetpreparingfortheRoyalvisit.jpg

1909 6th July Buttermarket Street preparing for the Royal visit.

 

19096thJulyWarringtonTownHallKingEdwardVIvisit.jpg

1909 6th July. The welcoming party assembled at Warrington Town Hall for King Edward VI visit.

 

1908ThedistinctivetowerofRobertGarnettsSonsCabinetUpholsterersoffSankeyStreet.jpg

1908 The distinctive tower of Robert Garnetts Sons Cabinet Upholsterers off Sankey Street.

 

1908LookingupButtermarketStreetwithBankStreetthroughthearchontheleft.jpg

1908 Looking up Buttermarket Street with Bank Street through the arch on the left.

 

1908FormerWesleyanChapelUpperBankStreetwithpupilsoftheRaggedSundaySchool.jpg

1908 The former Wesleyan Chapel Upper Bank Street with pupils of the Ragged Sunday School.

 

1907Jan31sttheQueensHotelSankeyStreet.jpg

1907 Jan 31st the Queens Hotel in Sankey Street.

 

1907ChurchStreetwithRylandsontheleft.jpg

1907 Church Street with Rylands factory on the left.

 

1907BridgeStreetnearMarketGate.jpg

1907 Bridge Street near Market Gate, would the sign on Crampton's shop be allowed today?.

 

1904MarketGate.jpg

1904 Market Gate, looking down Sankey Street from Buttermarket Street.

 

1904june16thMarketGate.jpg

1904 June16th Market Gate, looking down Bridge Street from Horsemarket Street.1907BridgeStreet.jpg

1907 Bridge Street showing the few remaining buildings prior to completion of the widening of the street.[/img]

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Great photos Algy.

 

Re the one of Market Gate (1904 June 16th) with the rather smart looking polceman on... is that looking down Bridge Street as the road looks very sloped.

 

Bridge Streeet was very narrow in those days eh and what has occurred to me after seeing all your photo's is how intimidating all the narrow roads, side streets and passageways must have felt in the dark.

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Dizz, I will be honest with you I have not managed to sort out the orientation of the two photos that is why i didn't state which street was which, normally I am pretty good at identifying streets in the old town, I have a feeling that Bridge Street runs from right to left of the phote as the sets in the road are in an unbroken line, that to me indicates that that roadway is the main thoroughfare through the town and that would have been Bridge Street, which would mean that the photographer was standing in Buttermarket street then Horse market Street but as yet I don't now which or whether my assumption is correct or not. Anyones interpretation will be considered. :?:wink:

ps.

If I remember correctly Melias was at the top of Bridge Street, I shall have to trawl through the photos.

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Which photo Harry ?

 

If you mean the one with all the kiddies waiting for the Kings visit its one of my favourites. There's just something really special about that one (well I think so). To me it's the way some of the little kiddies look sort of grubby in their oversided ragged clothes while others are a little better dressed. The young girl at the front holding the small child wrapped in a blanket caught my eye straight away as did the little ones near her.

 

On the other photo's and also the ones Algy put on another thread for the same Kings visit you can certainly tell the difference between the 'classes' so to speak when you compare their clothing eh although how often the smarter people washed their hats, suite, long coats and flowing dresses/skirts is questionable.

 

I bet they were rather 'whiffy' :oops:

 

Saying that I guess maybe it was nothing to do with class and the ladies would all dress in such a way when out in public would they ??

 

Not like today when some of us (ok me) just pops to the shops in jeans, boots and a jumper :oops: I have reall class eh :wink::lol:

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