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Amazing new aerial photos !!


indy
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:o following further intensive reseach including aerial survey I have discovered new archaeological features in the area of Warburton that may reveal a new phase in the history of the area.... They would explain many of the prehistoric finds I have been making....

 

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Photo one : a series of three ring features.

 

Photo two : Main ring showing entrance.

 

 

 

Please feel free to comment... serious comments only please..

 

[ 06.05.2007, 22:52: Message edited by: indiana James ]

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:o That is the difference between a trained eye !!! Anyone can see the circular features within the crop . The surrounding fields are producing neolithic and early bronze age artefacts circa 4000bc to 2000bc.

 

Passed the photos to three indepenent people today and said nothing... They all picked out the circular features that are in excess of 50 metres across TMM and Lost Treasure I am sure you can both see this

 

[ 06.05.2007, 22:56: Message edited by: indiana James ]

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One of the many things I regret about not living on the island of my birth is not being able to visit & experience the abundance of historic sites.

 

The photos featured in this post do seem to indicate archaeological features beneath the surface. Fascinating!

 

Sure over here the aboriginal culture stretches back about 50,000 years - but the remnants of their ancient rock art is generally located in remote places, and as for their ancient dwellings, well, bark huts don't last long do they. Other than that, we've only got european history dating from 1788 (i.e. the first settlement in Sydney).

 

My message is: enjoy it and revel in it.

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Also a distinctive 'path' leading from one of the circles.

Three circles in close formation ........ maybe linked to the very popular 'triple spiral' pattern very commonly used from the bronze age. Usually indicative of birth, life and re-birth. Quite significant to have three such large 'features' so close together. What bronze age or iron age finds have come from this location ??

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I spoke to someone about this this afternoon, and he told me that he had spoken to you James about these rings last year, and we were both sure that these rings have been listed in the ads nmr since at least 2004.

 

and been visible on google maps system to anyone who used the ads system since they started their beta of the included google map

 

Be aware though that the nmr google map location is not accurate, they have a history of mapping their co ordinates miles out from the actual location of the item (a good example of this is our local Castle Hill mound, which although listed in the ads system is supposed to be located somewhere in the middle of Rob Lane, off Newton le Willows High Strret.)

 

The ads nmr record for these markings shows them to be in the 'unmarked' ploughed field a field adjacent to the actual marks which you have shown, but knowing that they normally manage to bugger up the shown map shouldnt stop anyone finding this set of marks, below and to the left of the link

 

http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/search/fr.cfm?M=1&RCN=NMR_NATINV-890887

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Thanks for that Steve, the surrounding fields have brought up hundreds of worked flint implements over the past few years of my field walking the site.

Other fields have produced Bronze age metalwork as well ( The Warburton Axe ).

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:D Tony, the surrounding fields have produced flint arrowheads, scrapers, borers and various other flint implements. All the artefacts that I have recovered have been recorded by the Portable antiquities scheme including the bronze diminutive axe dated to 1700BC and of the Willerby type, similar to examples recovered from Bush Barrow. The flints were examined by Phil Harding and he was happy that they were a mix of Neolithic and Bronze Age in date...

 

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These are just a small fraction of flint work that I have recovered to date.. I do already have full permission to continue researching and field walking the site later this year.

 

[ 07.05.2007, 19:51: Message edited by: indiana James ]

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you're right, no labs, but if you try and chop a tree down with a chert axe, you'll find it in smithereens before too long. flint will serve you much better. Also, trying to make a tool, particularly a fine one like an arrow head, out of chert is really hard because it fractures to hell and breaks.

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Actually Peter they are logical replies :wink: and you seem to underestimate the intelligence of people of those periods in roughly saying they couldn't have known any better than use what they did ......... quite wrong actually :wink: black flint is the superior one, and if needs must then use the next grade possible, although chert does actually crumble and shatter quickly :wink: some of the flints in the pic just look like flakes from possible knapping, only the last piece shows any real signs of being knapped with the pressure flaking marks.

 

[ 08.05.2007, 11:14: Message edited by: tonymailman ]

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There are many worked flint tools that have been picked up including scrapers, arrow heads, knives etc that I have not uploaded on here as they need photographing. There are birding arrowheads and larger ones also. Many of the flint blades have been re-touched and show secondary flaking having taken place. One field alone produced over 300 examples.

As I say the best ones have all been recorded by The portable antiquities scheme. The rest which are debotage and waste have also been noted.

 

I have also collected many microliths (Neolithic) from the fields. As I said Phil Harding looked at many of these examples while he was at warburton.

 

Regarding the chert artefacts, many are poorly worked and may have been used purely as practise pieces. I agree that chert is a poor material...

 

I recovered a piece of yorkshire wold flint the size of a football that has been clearly used to break off pieces in preparation for producing implements.

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