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Recycling - Blue Bin


Coffee
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I put a plastic shower curtain into the blue bin, having spent an hour pulling out the metal hoops. Came home to find the curtain on top of the bin.

 

I looked at the WBC web site and shocked to see that I should not be putting plastic bags into the blue bin or rigid plastic.

 

Is the whole point of the blue bin to recycle things like plastic?

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No...it's just a load of tosh to appease the green luvvies

 

if they did it properly, every bit of plastic would be recycled... it's like the old "Wrong type of leaves" scenario when it comes to any councils recycling policy. Most haven't got a clue

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Yes but only certain types of plastics and it says what you can/can't put in on your bin sticker and like you know on the council's website too. 

Does seem daft not to be able to put plastic carrier bags in but maybe that's cos most are all biodegradable now so I'm guessing they are not recyclable into other stuff (no idea though really) but they are trying to stop people using them so just shoving them in the blue bin wouldn't be helping.

Good that the binmen just took your shower curtain out and put it on the top rather than not emptying your bin at all becasue of it being in there when it shouldn't have been though :D

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You could recycled your shower curtain yourself Coffee.  Some of these ideas are quite good and I wish I'd not thrown mine away in my black bin last month now :wink:
 

Use A Plastic Shower Curtain:

 

  1. As a small tarpaulin for over logs and firewood.
  2. To line your table or floor when your kids are doing a messy project.
  3. For a bed liner when the grandkids come to visit and they aren’t quite potty trained.
  4. Under your blanket on a picnic to keep it from getting damp.
  5. Keep a plastic shower curtain in the boot of your car to put down when you carry things or to put over your head if you break down in heavy rain with no umbrella.
  6. Lay it on the ground when you are pruning rose bushes or weeding. You can drag the whole thing to your compost heap or pick up to toss the clippings into your green bin.
  7. Cut a hole in it to use it as a poncho or to make a cover for kids when doing a messy job.
  8. If there is a sudden and unexpected downpour, throw it over the clothes on your washing line to stop them getting them wet. That way you don’t have to hurry and take everything off of the line.
  9. Place old shower curtains under tents when camping or throw them over camping gear if it rains.
  10. Cut into chunks and use underneath things like dog or cat bowls.
  11. Cut and sew them into bibs or sew on bibs you already have as a liner.
  12. Use as a protective floor or furniture covering when painting.
  13. Use instead of sheets to make a play tent for the kids in the garden. If it rains it won’t matter because they can still stay out and play.
  14. Use it as a temporary covering for a broken window or to patch a leaky roof.
  15. Sew them into beach or swimming bags to carry your wet stuff. Some shower curtains even have a perfect “beachy” look to them to make them really cute.
  16. Place under a rug by the front door for everyone to set their wet boots on when the come in.

    Bet you're glad you still have yours now eh :):lol: :lol:
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All plastics can be recycled but this is why we only recycle some plastics:

 

To ensure value for money, councils are able to recycle more plastic per pound spent on the recycling scheme by collecting plastic containers only.

Only collecting plastic containers reduces contamination from different types of plastic and ensures high grade material that can be recycled.

Plastic containers are relatively dense and compact which enables them to be easily sorted mechanically, into the different types of plastics. Plastic film and bags are not easily mechanically sorted making them very costly to sort.

Plastic film and bags are much more likely to be contaminated with food waste and as a result market demand for these mixed plastics is currently limited and less secure.

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Plastic film and bags are much more likely to be contaminated with food waste and as a result market demand for these mixed plastics is currently limited and less secure.

 

So the plastic containers that contain food or empty milk bottles; stinking after two weeks in a recycling bin over the summer because of your Labour councils cuts, are more attractive?

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I think you're supposed to wash them before you put them in your blue bin Baz :wink:

says who? Are the council going to re-imburse me the cost for the water or do they expect me to pay for that on top of suffering their Labour cuts?

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Come and swill them at mine if you like...we don't have a water meter :lol:  Must admit I forgot that plastic ping meal trays etc can go in the blue bin and ours always finish up in the black bin.  Dog food tins do too as even when you rinse them they still smell.  No way do I want two stinky bins in the yard so our blue is just used for paper, carbdoard, food tins, jars and of course lots of wine bottles  8)  :lol: 

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There's a serious question about whether using water to clean stuff for recycling is environmentally beneficial, but if you can't afford to use a bit of water to rinse out containers before they go in the blue bin, you must be very poor. As for "Labour Council cuts" -

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/conservative/9770908/Tory-shires-in-revolt-over-cuts.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/patrick-butler-cuts-blog/2014/dec/18/council-cuts-local-tories-lead-criticism-as-savings-hit-vital-services

 

 "It's a basic right for every English man and woman to be able to put the remnants of their chicken tikka masala in their bin without having to wait a fortnight for it to be collected." (Eric Pickles earns the prize for daftest quote of the last Parliament)

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While I understand that the council needs to keep an eye on costs, while you explained why plastic bags are not taken, why is it rigid plastic is not taken.

 

It is unusual for council to demand its waste is to be clean. Things like milk bottles only need to be rinsed other things, need to be properly washed taking not just water but power to heat the water as well as chemicals in resources.

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There's a serious question about whether using water to clean stuff for recycling is environmentally beneficial, but if you can't afford to use a bit of water to rinse out containers before they go in the blue bin, you must be very poor. As for "Labour Council cuts" -

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/conservative/9770908/Tory-shires-in-revolt-over-cuts.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/patrick-butler-cuts-blog/2014/dec/18/council-cuts-local-tories-lead-criticism-as-savings-hit-vital-services

 

 "It's a basic right for every English man and woman to be able to put the remnants of their chicken tikka masala in their bin without having to wait a fortnight for it to be collected." (Eric Pickles earns the prize for daftest quote of the last Parliament)

 

 

Yes maybe I am poor........ but I have to pay my way in life....I don't get a house with my job or taxpayers to pay and fund me for going to meetings...."judge righteously, defend the rights of the poor and needy"

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Here is a cunning way to help the environment and stop your recycle bin smelling all for free.  When you have done your washing up, instead of emptying away the soapy water, wash the things for recycling in it and hey presto clean rubbish that cost you nothing and will not smell .  Not hard is it?

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Rigid plastics and other non recyclable items, no problem.  The Council provide for you, free of charge, several sites where skips are placed at your disposal (ha).  Just take your stuff to your nearest tip.  If you are a bit unsure as to which skip to use ask one of the cheerful and helpful members of staff and they will be happy to help.

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Rigid plastics and other non recyclable items, no problem.  The Council provide for you, free of charge, several sites where skips are placed at your disposal (ha).  Just take your stuff to your nearest tip.  If you are a bit unsure as to which skip to use ask one of the cheerful and helpful members of staff and they will be happy to help.

 

but I am just a poor oik.... what if I have no means to get to this wondrous place? and what if I cannot communicate with these happy skip dippers?

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Fyi Baz the Council will provide a collection service even though you do have several modes of transport in which to transport your waste, you mention them regularly ???? there will be a charge for the collection obviously but I am sure if you are as destitute as you claim it will be free. Also fyi the Council employees are not allowed to dip the skips and they were quite conversant last time I spoke to them.

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Here is a cunning way to help the environment and stop your recycle bin smelling all for free.  When you have done your washing up, instead of emptying away the soapy water, wash the things for recycling in it and hey presto clean rubbish that cost you nothing and will not smell .  Not hard is it?

 

I have a mini dishwasher.

 

However I could bring my rubbish round to yours and you can do it for me

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Ah I see you want YOUR waste removing either by others or at others expense.  Instead of bringing it to me take it to the tip.  Why would you need to wash your plastic curtain?  Take it to the tip in your Honda.  As for having a dishwasher, so do I, (full sized)   but I still use the washing up bowl occasionally and do the tins and bottles then.  Also if you have lots of waste I can recommend BT skips for service, reliability, price  and friendliness.

 

 

   Its not rocket science is it?  

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I can't say I've ever had any problem sorting recycling waste from non recyclable. It only takes a modicum of common sense really, as per PJ's suggestion for using washing up water for washing your recyclables after doing your dishes. It all smacks of "don't want to do it so I won't" to be honest.

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