Jump to content

9. Building the Manchester Ship Canal.


algy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Runcorn Britannia (Ethelfleda) Railway Bridge had been built before the construction of the Manchester Ship Canal by the London and North Western Railway Company. The Company opposed any deepening of the ground beneath their bridge, their opposition delaying work on the Canal. Here we can see the toll booth at the pedestrian entrance.

z0116_EntrancetoRuncornTollBridge.jpg

 

Entrance to the Shropshire Union Canal from the River Mersey, Ellesmere Port.

z0118_EntrancetotheShropshireUnionCanalfromRiverMersey.jpg

 

Excavation for a Lock wall at Pomona Salford.

z0120_ExcavationForWallatPomona.jpg

 

Traditional craftsmen were brought in from Holland to do fascine work on the Canal's banks. This involved the weaving of willow over the top of the banks surface and pegged down (similar to thatch) in order to protect the soil from water erosion, fascine was put in place on several sections of the route where the banks were thought to be particularly vulnerable.

z0123_FascineWorkatModeWheel.jpg

 

Fascine Work at Partington.

z0124_FascineWorkatPartington.jpg

 

Navvies up to their knees in mud with a fascine covered bank behind them.

z0126_FascineWorkontheManchesterShipCanal.jpg

 

A fine example of how the fascine was laid.

z0127_FascineWorkPartington.jpg

 

A Ferry Steamer entering Eastham 'new' lock.

z0128_FerrySteameratEastham.jpg

 

First Journey From Liverpool to Manchester.

z0129_FirstJourneyFromLiverpooltoManchester.jpg

 

Fisher Renwick Co. Office at Saltport, Weston Point, quite comfortable by the standards of working conditions on the canal excavations at that time.

z0131_FisherRenwickCoOfficeatSaltport.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great photos as usual. For some reason I find the first and last ones particularly evocative. I've never heard of fascine before though I'm a bit concerned about the Willow rotting away and causing a land slip!

Don't worry it hasn't happened to date Tracey!. :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tremendous photos as usual Algy. I notice from your photos that the first trip was on a boat called Snowdrop!

 

The other day I photographed the tour boat coming from Latchford Locks up to and underneath the Cantilever bridge and that too is named Snowdrop. I would presume it's not the same boat!

 

060612SnowdropapproachesCantileverBridge.jpg

 

060612Snowdrop.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tremendous photos as usual Algy. I notice from your photos that the first trip was on a boat called Snowdrop!

z0129_FirstJourneyFromLiverpooltoManchester.jpg

The other day I photographed the tour boat coming from Latchford Locks up to and underneath the Cantilever bridge and that too is named Snowdrop. I would presume it's not the same boat!

 

060612SnowdropapproachesCantileverBridge.jpg

 

060612Snowdrop.jpg

The 'Snowdrop' in your photos is not the same ferry shown in the old photo, the present ferry 'Snowdrop' was originally launched in 1959 and named 'Woodchurch'being renamed 'Snowdrop' in 2004.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 'Snowdrop' in your photos is not the same ferry shown in the old photo, the present ferry 'Snowdrop' was originally launched in 1959 and named 'Woodchurch'being renamed 'Snowdrop' in 2004.

Thanks, I remember a ferry named Woodchurch although I don't remember seeing or travelling on it.I suppose it's nice they renamed it Snowdrop to associate it with history and the first journey on the canal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fascineating pics (sorry I couldn't resist) :oops:

 

 

Midlec... Great photo's especially as you are looking down on them. I guess that's one of the boats that does the tours considereing the number of people on board. I've always fancied going on one of those has anyone been on one?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oooh forgeot to ask and I know we've probably talked about it before in the past and you probably told me Algy but ...

 

Would the Fascine have been used on the canal banks around here too and was it used above the water line or only below as like you know areas of the canal bank have been dug up around my way lately and I can't help but think that in doing so that it must have made it less stable as 100 years of vegetation, roots and maybe even fascine have been disturbed and removed.

 

Infact why am I worrying as I wont be living over there and the developers are building the new houses on huge steel? piles anyway so if it all slips away under them they will be safe on stilts and will only need rope ladders and canoes to reach our solid ground :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember spending days on the Woodchurch when younger. It travelled out from Birkenhead to Liverpool and back. In those days a child's ticket was 3d, so it was a very cheap day out. We took a bottle of pop and some sandwiches and just rode the ferry until tired of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fascineating pics (sorry I couldn't resist) :oops:

 

 

Midlec... Great photo's especially as you are looking down on them. I guess that's one of the boats that does the tours considereing the number of people on board. I've always fancied going on one of those has anyone been on one?

Hi Dizzy. I've not been on a ferry trip on the MSC, but I know folk who have, and have enjoyed it, and found it very educational. It's not cheap, about £37 one way, either start at Salford or Liverpool. Return trip by bus is included in the price. If considering it, wrap up well, commonsense really, on a boat deck it can get cold, even on a warm day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oooh forgeot to ask and I know we've probably talked about it before in the past and you probably told me Algy but ...

 

Would the Fascine have been used on the canal banks around here too and was it used above the water line or only below as like you know areas of the canal bank have been dug up around my way lately and I can't help but think that in doing so that it must have made it less stable as 100 years of vegetation, roots and maybe even fascine have been disturbed and removed.

 

Infact why am I worrying as I wont be living over there and the developers are building the new houses on huge steel? piles anyway so if it all slips away under them they will be safe on stilts and will only need rope ladders and canoes to reach our solid ground :lol:

 

It could have been used along the bank where you are Dizz, it depends on the nature of the soil, it would have been used down well below the water line. Fascine doesn't prevent landslip it prevents rain/surface water washing the top soil down a slope and also gives vegetation a chance to grow on the slope of the banking, below the water line it assists in preventing moving water from washing the bank surface away. Regarding the building of the development opposite you the land is that well compacted that nothing is going to move and as you have pointed out they are driving steel piles in to support and strengthen the ground.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...