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Free school buses?


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Do you really need to ask that question???? Public transport? Oh, no I forgot, in most cases it would probably entail 3 or 4 buses for the children, so not really an option is it?

 

The schools should invest in their own buses, employ their own drivers and the parents who aren't entitled to free travel would gladly pay something for the convenience.

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I thought the law stated

 

Pupils get free transport if:
•they attend their nearest suitable school, and 
•it is beyond statutory walking distance, which is two miles for pupils under eight, and three miles for those of eight and over 

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Seems the Council can't afford them anymore - will it mean kids getting fitter by walking/cycling to school or will the school run increase? :unsure:

 

 

From what I've seen, when schools try and encourage cycling to school, any increase is those who would have previously walked - it does not reduce the number being driven there. So I can't see the lack of a bus leading to an increase in cycling.

 

 

(When I firts saw the heading I thought it referred to buses for free schools and thought - well if they want to set up their own schools they can provide their own ******** buses)

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The parents of children attending the 'Free Schools' will make sure that their transport is organised as they are the committed parents who want the best for their children and are prepared to fight for it. Whatever your views on Free Schools, you cannot berate the parents for that, they are legally entitled to take up that option.

 

As long as parents can make the choice about where to send their offspring and have been offered free or subsidised transport, then that system should continue until those children leave school. If choice of schools is stopped, then transport shouldn't be an issue as the council have to meet their legal obligations regarding distance from school.

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The parents of children attending the 'Free Schools' will make sure that their transport is organised as they are the committed parents who want the best for their children and are prepared to fight for it. Whatever your views on Free Schools, you cannot berate the parents for that, they are legally entitled to take up that option.

 

As long as parents can make the choice about where to send their offspring and have been offered free or subsidised transport, then that system should continue until those children leave school. If choice of schools is stopped, then transport shouldn't be an issue as the council have to meet their legal obligations regarding distance from school.

 

 

If they want to be free of local authority control then they should not expect the council to provide subsidised transport.

 

 

i hope you are not suggesting that parents who have a developed the belief that there is something fundamentally better abourt free schools are more committed than other parents. Many of the second group do not have faith in such an unknown, barely regulated establishment.

 

 

From my conversations with many of those who support the Woolston proposals many are doing so through continued bitterness that it wasn't Padgate/Lyasander that was closed and have the delusion that Woolston High School will somehow arise fully reborn.

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And other parents don't then. :unsure: :unsure:

 

No Wolfie, that wasn't what I meant at all! Having put effort into setting up a school, they are not going to fall at the hurdle of how to get their children there.

 

Nick, I don't suppose the parents have even considered subsidised transport, that was your first supposition on reading the fist posting and the point I was answering. It remains to be seen how the school prospers and what standards are achieved, but I would bet that it will be a success because it is not in the interests of anyone for it to fail. Of course the majority of parents are committed to their children's education, but for some, the commitment is seen in action to make something different happen, rather than the supposition that if the education provision isn't good enough, someone else is at fault and they can't do anything about it. I suspect that if this turns out to be a good school, there will be hundreds suddenly becoming interested in their children attending.

 

The Free Schools are not limited by Council funding and have control over their own finances as well as the freedom to hire and fire, therefore attracting a higher quality of teacher who will be motivated to achieve high standards or face the possibility of losing their job.

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The Free Schools are not limited by Council funding and have control over their own finances...

 

They have control over the funds provided from central government, which will always be more than generously adequate.

 

...as well as the freedom to hire and fire...

 

Schools already have this, but the big difference is that Free Schools will be able to employ people as teachers who don't have Qaulified Teacher Status (QTS), thus attracting the finest quality know-alls at reduced wages.

 

therefore attracting a higher quality of teacher who will be motivated to achieve high standards or face the possibility of losing their job.

 

Crikey, you've really swallowed this hook, line and sinker haven't you?

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The Free Schools are not limited by Council funding and have control over their own finances...

 

They have control over the funds provided from central government, which will always be more than generously adequate.

 

...as well as the freedom to hire and fire...

 

Schools already have this, but the big difference is that Free Schools will be able to employ people as teachers who don't have Qaulified Teacher Status (QTS), thus attracting the finest quality know-alls at reduced wages.

 

therefore attracting a higher quality of teacher who will be motivated to achieve high standards or face the possibility of losing their job.

 

Crikey, you've really swallowed this hook, line and sinker haven't you?

 

 

Fancy being a teacher Observer? :wink:

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Crikey, you've really swallowed this hook, line and sinker haven't you?

 

No, I've considered the evidence and think it is a great opportunity for those who cannot afford private education but aren't satisfied with what is on offer.

 

I've been both a teacher and a parent struggling to find a good school, some years ago, so I know a little about both sides and am entitled to my opinion.

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Schools already have this, but the big difference is that Free Schools will be able to employ people as teachers who don't have Qaulified Teacher Status (QTS), thus attracting the finest quality know-alls at reduced wages.

 

Correct fugs, and with the closing down of Teacher training colleges these quality know alls will be the ones training the new teachers. :roll: :roll:

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so I know a little about both sides and am entitled to my opinion

 

Yes, of course you are!

 

But this:

 

...a higher quality of teacher who will be motivated to achieve high standards or face the possibility of losing their job.

 

...sounds like typical Gov.UK PR codswallop to me.

 

High quality teachers, or bricklayers or waiters for that matter, don't need the threat of a P45 to be motivated. The worst kind of managers I've ever worked for are those who think they can rule through fear.

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The Free Schools are not limited by Council funding and have control over their own finances as well as the freedom to hire and fire, therefore attracting a higher quality of teacher

 

As fugs has already said, they won't be high quality teachers, they will be

high quality know alls 

They don't even have to employ qualified teachers.

 

Free schools can:

•set their own pay and conditions for staff;

•employ teachers without qualified teacher status;

•determine their own admissions arrangements;

•decide upon their own curriculum;

•set the length of terms and school days; and

•operate independently of the local authority

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