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Name dropping Freeborn

 

I have said many times in many different posts what I do for a living, just shows how much attension you were paying. I repair and calibrate test equipment, oscilloscopes, Digital multimeters at one end to specialist calibration rigs used on nuclear power stations at the other with everything in between, interesting in the fact that I work all over and get to go on explosive sites and MOD sites, also crap because I spend a lot of my time on motorways and hotels. calibration of oscilloscopes and multimeters is not that specialised, the skill I suppose comes in the repair, at the other end calibration rigs you could say is more specialised but if you give it time you get there, anyone could do simple calibration after a small amount training, my company would take anyone on with a HNC in electrical engineering. Not many people stick with it as travel and hotels put them off after a while. Like anything else it's sticking with the job long enough to get the experience, and sadly not many do, but if you do you get known for it, and companies ask for you as you have familiarity with their kit and specialised kit. It's a living. To be honest I have not seen many foreigners at all actually in calibration but I work in sites such as power stations and other sites where you see a lot. At the end of the day I'm an engineer and the people I tend to bump into at my work are other engineers, working on the sites I go to.

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Name dropping Freeborn I have said many times in many different posts what I do for a living, just shows how much attention you were paying. I repair and calibrate test equipment, oscilloscopes, Digital multimeters at one end to specialist calibration rigs used on nuclear power stations at the other with everything in between, interesting in the fact that I work all over and get to go on explosive sites and MOD sites, also crap because I spend a lot of my time on motorways and hotels. calibration of oscilloscopes and multimeters is not that specialised, the skill I suppose comes in the repair, at the other end calibration rigs you could say is more specialised but if you give it time you get there, anyone could do simple calibration after a small amount training, my company would take anyone on with a HNC in electrical engineering. Not many people stick with it as travel and hotels put them off after a while. Like anything else it's sticking with the job long enough to get the experience, and sadly not many do, but if you do you get known for it, and companies ask for you as you have familiarity with their kit and specialised kit. It's a living. To be honest I have not seen many foreigners at all actually in calibration but I work in sites such as power stations and other sites where you see a lot. At the end of the day I'm an engineer and the people I tend to bump into at my work are other engineers, working on the sites I go to.

Ah, I see.

Hmmm. I don't suppose you know anyone who could calibrate a rather nice Swiss made Tesa 0-1" Tesamaster micrometer then...

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Unfortunately, the Tesamaster uses an intricate system where the 2nd and 3rd digits pop up in windows in the thimble like the mileage in a car speedo, it must be like a Swiss watch in there, the whole thing is well out, and on top of which, I suspect the whole anvil has shifted.

When I said 'calibrated' I admit I misspoke myself, 'rebuilt' might be more accurate.

There are some intriguing screws, sealed with red paint, under the thimble cover.

I'm tempted to go in.

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I'm tempted to go in.

Before you endeavour to dismantle anything have a good think about why you need to.(i know this may sound a bit silly but do you make sure the faces of the anvil and the other end are clean. surprising what a bit of grit can do to a measurement.)

 

If you know that it consistantly out by say five thou. then you don't really need to take it apart. All you need to do is compensate for the error by adding or subtracting by the amount it is consistantly out.(that is if you are using it to measure the size of something. if you are using it to get a comparison on what it was t what it is now after say machining then it does not matter at all as long as you use the same micrometer for the measurement of before and after)

 

If you do decide to dismantle it with a view to restoring the accuracy, then i would suggest taking photos at every stage. that way at least you will know how it all goes back together an dwhere that spare bit came from when it has been reassembled. (there is usually a spare bit left over trust me on this).

 

 

a quick websearch found this site about halfway down the page is in structions for calibrating small errors in readng.

http://www.longislandindicator.com/p109.html

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