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One in ten schools -

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- now have more pupils, for whom English is their second language, according to the Telegraph. Wonder if the luvvy club will be in denial about this?

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Isn't that sort of old news now Obs and I'm sure you/we have been there many times before :wink: 

 

Just saying like.....

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If you recall Diz; I wasn't believed by some at the time, when I refered to a school in Warrington; now they can disbelieve the Telegraph.

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 97.9 % of Warrington's population is white British, how many of Warrington's schools are in this list? Nationally nine in every ten schools have a majority that speak English as their first language, quite impressive don't you think?

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I read somewhere that Spain has around 50 English speaking schools that follow the English national curriculum. I guess they are also having problems with immigrants.

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If the rest of the schools only have a minority of non-English speaking intakes; it will require specialist teacher/translators adding to the cost of Education overall - still it's only our money.  Sadako, there's always been "English" schools throughout the World for those with the money to pay for the fees; and if the Spanish are prepared to tolerate the Brits, it's their problem - although I suspect they like their money.

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listening to some of the language spoken by the schoolkids today it may be a lot more than one in ten.  text speak it is another language with vague references to "normal" spoken english.

 

When i were growing up it was dialects that were fowned upon and even understanding somebody from a few miles away could be difficult at best and impossible if you had never heard the dialect before, the broad leigh accent was one of the first i had to master when i started work but having a grounding in lancashire and yorkshire accent recognition helped somewhat. At one time a person only had to say one or two words to be instantly recognised by their accent. Then people were taught to talk proper like at the BBC and regional accents faded somewhat.

 

But here is the rub with the english, very few make an effort to speak in the native language of the country they are in and then frown upon people who come to this country and do the same as they do. pots and kettles methinks.

 

A joke i heard recently but probably older than Graham hill and his wife. Yorkshireman walks into a shop and says to the guy behind the counter, "git any arse cream" to which the guy replies "eye, magnum or cornetto"

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Agree with your point about lazy Brits not learning the language of their host Country Sid; they expect everyone else to speak English. However, it is not unreasonable in the UK, to expect permanent migrants to speak English.  Some of the kids arriving now in school intakes don't speak a word, which adds an extra load to education budgets; however I will admit, most are quick learners.

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Just read the WG Lt.... it's all there black and white.

Funnily enough when I read it this morning all I could think of was you Obs :lol::wink:

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Seems that school I mentioned, in Warrington, has now been identified in a local newspaper...

 

Yeah, but it doesn't say that any school around here has a majority of pupils with English as their second language.

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Not having English as a second language doesn't mean they need an interpreter. Some of those will already be bilingual and some trilingual before they start school, e.g.  Asian children with regional language, Hindi or Urdu, and English.

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I sort of agree with that Vic and young children do pick up new languages far easier and quicker than older ones or us 'adults'.

However here's a thought.....

If the parents of the children can't speak a lot of English themselves then how do they help their children with their homework etc etc etc. 

Going back 15 years to when our son started school the amount of input we as parents had from day one and right through all his school years was a lot. 
Saying that as he got older I didn't understand half the things he brought home to do either :lol:

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..... and some arrive in school, straight off the plane, not speaking a word of English. Yes, they're quick to learn at an early age; but the point is this is just one more load on the rate/tax payer's back. Much simpler, to require both parents and kids speak our language BEFORE they are allowed in. We now have an inter"National" Health Service, and it would seem an international Education Service too, and it's costing us money !

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