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Gaius Julius Caesar


tonymaillman
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TMM, what do u know of solid bronze 'S' shape brooches/ cloak clasps in the form of a huge sepent with scales ?? By the way its not a Dragonesque brooch..... or a sword scabard and it came from an area producing many Roman Republican silver coinage ?

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What's the written historical evidence for the location of Roman troops in the area? :roll: The invasion of 70ish AD, appeared to have been conducted in phases, with the Brigantes (a Roman Client) being left for a while, north of the Mersey; so perhaps, aside from a Legionary Fort at Chester, some outposts would have existed? :confused:

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Depends what you class as an 'outpost'. The nearest marching camps unearthed to date are located at Malton, Gleadthorpe and Water Eaton. Personally i don't think you'll be 'hitting' upon a marching camp.

Why ? because you have auxiliary forts to close at hand to need a marching camp. There were 3 main auxilliaries very close to here at Northwich, Manchester and Kirkham.

Your main forts then being Chester and Wroxeter. I've stated before that what you may be finding is 'marching losses' or dropped items - very common for people to lose stuff easily back then. Or, 'possibly' a trading post or occassional market area. Definitely not military.

As for the brooch, just because it's found amongst other Roman stuff doesn't necessarily mean it's Roman in production. It could be Celtic or even iron age, it may be a 'robbed' item then lost by a Roman. Depends how it's pinned also, can usually tell by the pin, Roman brooches were mainly unique types of pin construction, therefore without seeing it I cannot make an accurate judgement :roll: Serpent shapes, swirls etc were common amongst the ordovice, Brigantes of the area - either in bronze or iron, although iron was rarer for this type of item.

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James - with regards to the brooch, what length is it ? it may well be an 'S' fibula (common around the 1st/2nd century AD) OR dependant if the pin is integral it could be based upon the La Tene Celtic fibula.

I've made similar ones to these before, but the 'S' fibula is usually snake/serpent headed at each end with 'scales' incorporated into the casting, most of these though tend to be quite small - i.e up to 2 or 2 and a half inches long.

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