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Clearly efforts are being made by NHS management to improve matters; with the introduction of a central appointment registration call centre; which allows patients to be assigned to the Hospital with the shortest queue.  Fine in theory, BUT;  such an attempt at greater integration requires organisational integration, particularly with IT.   Experience suggests that one can become involved with several Consultants at different Hospital Trusts at the same time, BUT, it appears that information such as scan reports aren't easily transferable between trusts and specialists, which increases the waiting game and frequency of visits.  One would think that navigating through the system and pulling things together, would be a task assigned to your GP,  and that GP's should be "your GP", who knows you and your history intimately; alas sadly not the case.   The management of such a huge organisation is no doubt daunting, but as Sun Zu said " the management of a large Army is no different than that of a small one, it's merely a matter of organisation".  

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The scans themselves are sometimes done by agencies supplied as a rental deal with equipment being loaned for days or weeks. Therefore the scans have to be in a transportable form and the specification of interchange are well formed and public. The barriers are just organisational. The answer was demonstrated to me at Manchester Dental Hospital years ago. On checking in the clerical assistant gave me my notes and told me to take them with me to show me everyone I saw then hand them back before I left. Not practical with MRI scans etc. but the principle that the notes belong with the patient , i.e. today are stored away from the organisation doing the treatment, is important. Hospitals can cover up unnecessary delay because the reports aren't chased by the system just filed. I have heard many cases where appointments go missing in the post and patients have to start again.

Not sure about GPs. Having a doctor that is the one you always see does mean that they could remember what other matters you had discussed and shorten consultations. However this is being eroded by long waiting times and 10 mins. max consultations as the hours they work drop. The problems are more deep seated than just organisation of IT, for which the NHS has a massive set up already.

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The wider and easier sharing of IT data also brings in the issue of data security - so between a rock and a hard place on that one !     As I understand it other H/Services (certainly the US), place the GP in control of the patient's journey; but your right, that's difficult when you can't get an appointment with "your" own GP.  This raises the issue of supply and demand, in terms of staff levels to patient numbers; the latter having increased through population surges, unhealthy life styles and increasing age related illness.

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