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3. Building the MSC. Series 2.


algy
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UnloadingatStoneDelph.jpg

 

 

250 ton crane transporting a lock gate to Old Quay Yard at Runcorn.

TransportinglockgatetoOldQuay.jpg

 

 

TransportingalockgatetoOldQuayYard.jpg

 

 

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The Old Quay Cutting Runcorn.

TheOldQuayCutting.jpg

 

 

The oil tanker 'Spiraea' on fire, the fire started on 29th Feb 1916, the photo was taken on the 2nd March, Fire tender MSC Firefly finally withdrawn on the 6th March.

TheoilshipSpiraeaonfirestarted29thFeb1916phototaken2ndMarchFiretenderFireflywithdrawn6thMarch.jpg

 

The Arpley river Mersey diversion at Lower Walton Chester road.

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Tea Break at Rixton Cutting.

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Stonework standing ready to build Latchford Locks.

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Ok I'm going to sound stupid again.... but that were the syphon pipes for ?

 

If you don't ask you don't learn :oops::D

Dizz, If you don't ask, you will never know!.

Where the canal excavation cut through a water course they place large bore pipes under the canal bed to take the water flow from the likes of the River Gowy.

 

Detailed Explanation:

 

 

River Gowy Siphon.

 

The river Gowy is situated at the western end of the canal and drains a wide area of low ground which was subject to frequent flooding, the river eventually emptying itself into the Mersey estuary.

Due to the amount of silt and other debris carried in the river it was realised from the start that it could not be allowed to enter the canal and a way to let it drain into the Mersey must be found.

The eventual solution to the problem was to build a siphon underneath the canal bed which would enable the river to continue draining into the Mersey and allow it to carry away the vast quantities of silt.

Two twelve foot diameter cast iron pipes were laid beneath the canal and large brick chambers built at each end with hinged flaps protecting the outlet into the Mersey. On the land side sluices were built so that each pipe could be closed independently in order to allow repairs and inspections to be carried out on each pipe in turn. Other smaller siphons of similar design were built elsewhere along canal to carry away water and silt from brooks and streams which would otherwise cause problems if allowed to drain into the canal.

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