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Dangerous driving


asperity
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So far I haven't seen any commentary as to the exact circumstances. It looks like the smaller of the two was overtaking and trying to cross close ahead of the other, but found he was too close and was going to collide whatever he did. When it comes to court both vessels will be given a measure of blame proportionate to their actions at the time, who was the give way vessel etc.This is important when it comes to the insurance claims as the insurance companies will only pay out a proportion of the claim depending on the court judgement. The Singapore Straits are well known for dangerous driving with many ships just not following the rules.

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It's a bit of a mystery to me what the smaller ship was doing. The Singapore Strait is a separation scheme so it's like a dual carriageway, only we drive on the right at sea by convention. You can see another vessel coming the other way in the opposite lane (and probably having kittens wondering what the other 2 comedians are up to).  I can only assume there was a complete lack of attention on the part of the watchkeepers on both vessels.

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More information coming to light. It appears the larger vessel, Beks Halil, Turkish owned and Marshall Island flagged, was overtaking the other (as yet unnamed) vessel and, for reasons unknown, didn't obey the rule of the road (an overtaking vessel has to keep clear of an overtaken vessel). As far as I know there was no damage to the Beks Halil but the other vessel was reported to be sinking.

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That was absolute lunacy!, whoever was the master of the smaller vessel should lose his ticket. thanks Asp.

 

Too soon to pass judgement Algy, it may well be that the smaller vessel was less at fault. And, as Master myself, it's very worrying that the Master of the vessel is assumed to be on the bridge 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Okay the Master is in charge, but in this situation it should be expected that the Officer in charge of the watch should deal with the situation,and if he cannot, then call the Master. It remains to be seen what actually occured in this case, and I will be keeping a close watch for further information.

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Too soon to pass judgement Algy, it may well be that the smaller vessel was less at fault. And, as Master myself, it's very worrying that the Master of the vessel is assumed to be on the bridge 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Okay the Master is in charge, but in this situation it should be expected that the Officer in charge of the watch should deal with the situation,and if he cannot, then call the Master. It remains to be seen what actually occured in this case, and I will be keeping a close watch for further information.

Fair comment Asp.

 

Asp I am sure you are aware of this site, but for anyone else that is interested it has some very informative information about what is going on in the shipping world.

 

http://www.seanews.com.tr/article/ACCIDENTS/95747/emma-maersk-accident/ 

 

Powerful picture of the freighter SHINYO SAWAKO being taken into tow by a salvage tug after colliding with a fishing boat in the South China Sea,

 

shinyosawako_zps8cc35276.jpg

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