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Green Homes?


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A better plan would be for the subsidies to "renewables" to be stopped which should result in an immediate drop in our energy bills.

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After sitting through countless TV adverts, drifting my eyes to cornered internet ads and seeing many articles in the newspaper of efforts to conserve energy to help the world.
We are now replacing books with devices that run on electricity.................... Nice.

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My TOTAL energy bill for a two bed house is about £85 per month - call it an even thousand a year, not far short of the UK average of £1200 - NO WAY are savings of anything like £600 per year realistic without spending many tens of thousands on completely rebuilding the property.

 

And spending tens of thousands would result in repayments of way more than the energy saved.

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After sitting through countless TV adverts, drifting my eyes to cornered internet ads and seeing many articles in the newspaper of efforts to conserve energy to help the world.

We are now replacing books with devices that run on electricity.................... Nice.

 

Burn the books.... save money!

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After sitting through countless TV adverts, drifting my eyes to cornered internet ads and seeing many articles in the newspaper of efforts to conserve energy to help the world.

We are now replacing books with devices that run on electricity.................... Nice.

I think you would have to compare the low energy consumption of modern electronic devices, (TVs, computers ) allowing millions of people to read the same books, newspapers, magazines etc, with the large amount of energy required to produce paper copies of the same publications before making a judgement on that Wolfie.

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I can’t see what the problem is. Providing someone’s prepared to lend you the dosh to make the savings and providing they never charge you more than what you save then you’ve got to be quids in. How long it takes to pay back and how much it cost to borrow doesn’t really matter just as long as your bills are lower.  
 

 

An example they used on the news report cited a saving (presumably an estimate) of £600 pa, but the cost of the loan would be around £500 (not sure how long that would take to repay the total loan, or even how much the total is?)

 

 
In this case a £1200 average spend would drop the bill to £600 + £500 repayment making you £100 better off each year. If the loan was £5000 and interest free, it would take about ten years to pay off but it wouldn’t matter if it took twenty years, your still £100 year better off for doing it.
 
 
Bill :)
 
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It's not interest free though - the announcement stated "typical" interest rates of 8% per year.

 

That means that if you could make a saving of £600, and £500 of this went to repay the loan, then the maximum loan size for a ten year repayment would be about £3200.

 

There just ain't NO WAY you can HALVE the energy bills on a house for a spend of only £3200!

 

(Plus, there's an upfront "survey fee" to the householder of £150 regardless of whether or not any work gets done, and then work can only be done by "approved contractors" who will have had significant costs getting their accreditation and so will charge well over the odds and provide relatively poor value for money for the work they do)

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If homeowners want to either upgrade their homes, or move to a more modern property, or even completely rebuild their own houses in order to benefit from reduced energy usage then that's a financial decision for them alone to make.

 

No need for £175 million of taxpayers money to be pumped into a complicated scheme offering worse interest rates than people can get to finance their own improvements.

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They seem to have adopted a complex and convoluted approach, which may raise suspicion and deter folk taking it up - perhaps a free enviromental (energy saving upgrade) for ALL properties would fare better? I say "free", but ultimately we would be paying for it through taxation no doubt.

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Alot of people want to upgrade their home but are unable

 

Unable how?

 

Unable to afford a couple of rolls of loft insulation at a tenner a piece?

 

Or a few draught excluder strips for a fiver?

 

Unable to pick up the phone and get their utility company to pay for FREE cavity wall insulation?

 

Or get Warm Front to put a new boiler in for them for FREE?

 

Unable to find a couple of thousand for new double glazing throughout (despite sitting in a house worth hundreds of thousands)?

 

There's already plenty of free stuff out there for householders - paid for by all the pseudo-green levies on the bills of those who've already done it off their own bats.

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