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Warrington Nature Conservation Forum - Facebook site & Spring meet 2nd March


Geoffrey Settle
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The Warrington Nature Conservation Forum launched its New Facebook site less than six months ago and we now have a membership of 124 on-line members.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Warrington-Nature-Conservation-Forum/110886079024465

 

While our main focus is Warrington & the surrounding area and what is going on with regard to Nature Conservation we do have occasional Facebook Postcards from our holiday destinations if we discover something of interest.

The Forum is definitely not political but we will on occasion’s campaign on issues to raise public awareness joining with our other nature partners such as Cheshire Wildlife, Mersey Forest etc.

 

2013 is going to be a big one in raising the awareness of Ash Die-back and we intend to take part in any way we can in gathering/surveying as well as continuing to do survey work on all the very important SINCS and SSSI sites.

The simple message is that everyone with an interest in Nature Conservation is more that welcome.

 

Another source of information is our page on the council web site where you will be able to download our quarterly WNCF newsletter

http://www.warrington.gov.uk/info/200795/parks_and_green_spaces/60/nature_conservation

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  • 1 month later...
Saw a kingfisher by a grotty little stream next to Enfield Park Road (by track leading up to golf course) . I wouldn't have thought there would be any food for it.

It's amazing Nick, even the most unlikely lookiing and tiny streams and brooks hold sticklebacks, minnow, stone loach, bullhead and if deep enough and slow flowing, roach and perch. I read where the North American species Pumpkinseed are now breeding in our waters, introduced by someone who bought them as ornamental aquarium stock then the idiot released them into our waters, yet another invasive species like the Signal Crayfish that is displacing our freshwater Crayfish, so your little Kingfisher will have sufficient of a food source to sustain it's life and hopefully will continue to breed there.

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It's amazing Nick, even the most unlikely lookiing and tiny streams and brooks hold sticklebacks, minnow, stone loach, bullhead and if deep enough and slow flowing, roach and perch. I read where the North American species Pumpkinseed are now breeding in our waters, introduced by someone who bought them as ornamental aquarium stock then the idiot released them into our waters, yet another invasive species like the Signal Crayfish that is displacing our freshwater Crayfish, so your little Kingfisher will have sufficient of a food source to sustain it's life and hopefully will continue to breed there.

 

 

Thanks Algy - that's good to know. It would be fabtastic if it did breed there.

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There would have to be two for that to happen.

 

Quite true * - unless it's a virgin birth and the offspring the avian messiah

 

There you go Cleo, you studying for that CSE in Biology was useful after all :P

 

 

* I know some reptiles can reproduce through parthenogenesis but not, as far as I am aware birds.

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:lol:  :lol:  :lol:

 

Did you know that some sea slugs have detachable willies which they tend to disgard after mating.  Sometimes they are just fall off or are left behind and other times they are chewed off by the 'female' or the 'male' themselves.

 

Before your eyes start watering too much... then can grow another one back though so all is not lost completely :lol:

 

Nature is a bizarre and wonderful think though eh ?

 

As for Kingfishers.... I saw one a couple of years back on the Bridgewater Canal near here and it was stunning to see.  I'd never seen one before (other than pics) but sadly I've never seen one since which is a shame.

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Near here, there are quite a few kingfishers, (some of the more readily recognised blue and orange plumaged, some black and white and a few of variegated colours) on the banks of the canal. It's so lovely to sit and watch them diving for fish but I don't think the anglers who fish there are so pleased about them.

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Have seen kingfishers around sankey valley hear to where i live. One of the regular dog walkers seems to think they have a nest in the area somewhere as he says he has seen at least four in the area ion the last year.

 

Did see the cormorant this morning as it cruised over the canal and am hoping the crested grebes come back again this year to join the usuale rabble of ducks,geese,swans,coots,moorhens and herons. Havbe yet to see the mink that are in the area but don't get as much time for watching wildlife at the moment.

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Seen what Peter ? 

 

Mink ?  Kingfishers ?  or others ?   I might go and have a nosey over that way next time I fancy a stroll out with my camera.  You'll have to give me a clue what I might be looking for and where though as wildlife and/or their habitats  is not one of my strong points :wink:

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Seen what Peter ? 

 

Mink ?  Kingfishers ?  or others ?   I might go and have a nosey over that way next time I fancy a stroll out with my camera.  You'll have to give me a clue what I might be looking for and where though as wildlife and/or their habitats  is not one of my strong points :wink:

Dizz, it really is worth going to the Moore Nature reserve, I don't want to put you off but make sure someone accompanies you as although only half a mile away from Moore village it is very isolated down there, on a nice day there are usually plenty of bird watchers around. It's only 10mins from where you live, turn right at the Walton Arms traffic lights before the 'Toast Rack' bridge on Chester Road, down Runcorn Road then take the third right down Moore Lane, over the MS canal swing bridge, the car park is immediately over the cross road on the right, coming out of the car park turn right and walk down Lapwing Lane for a 100 yards or so and there is a large hide on the left where you can watch and photograph the wild life. I drove down there with Mrs Algy on Tuesday and there were dozens of twitchers with scopes and cameras set up, all pointing at the same area of wood so I assume there must have been a 'Lesser spotted crosseyed one legged bent billed toe scratcher' in the locality, joking apart, I believe there are Chipmunks there that some idiot has released.

My God Dizz your turning into a 'Twitcher'. :D:wink:

 

There are Wardens patrolling the reserve and I believe they are very approachable and informative.

 

Note - Dogs must be kept on their lead although I believe there is a 'dog walking meadow', not sure where this is situated though.

 

 

 

Oh! and don't attempt to explore by car around there, the lane on the left after crossing the swing bridge is so pot holed that it is not accessible without a four wheel drive also Lapwing lane becomes a dirt road and very rutted, the road to the right at the crossroad only takes you to warehouses and is gated off and only opened for emergency access to through traffic if Moore Lane swing bridge breaks down in the off position, so remember there is only one way in and one way out.

 

ScreenShot003_zps6ce44a32.jpg

 

moore_nature_reserve_524_107_zps230058f0

 

ScreenShot004_zps452d11f9.jpg

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I couldn't believe my eyes when I looked through the bedroom window last night (well 12.06am to be precise).....

 

.... a badger was running past on the opposite pavement. 

 

We've lived here for over 20 years and I have never ever seen a badger.  I wish I'd have had my camera to hand. 

 

Appologies to my neighbours if I woke them up by shouting my son excitedly and rather loudly :oops:

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I couldn't believe my eyes when I looked through the bedroom window last night (well 12.06am to be precise).....

 

.... a badger was running past on the opposite pavement. 

 

We've lived here for over 20 years and I have never ever seen a badger.  I wish I'd have had my camera to hand. 

 

Appologies to my neighbours if I woke them up by shouting my son excitedly and rather loudly :oops:

 

 

I don't blame you for getting excited - the only time I've seen a badger in the wild is dead, having been run over by a car or (illegally) shot by a farmer (the badger that is, not me)

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Glad to hear you've never been shot by a farmer Nick :lol:

 

I'm glad I shouted my son though as when I rang round and told other members of my family etc today they said I'd probably just dreamt it and at first none of them believed me and I'd have probably started to wonder if I had too.... but no I didn't cos I have a witness.  My son keeps telling me to 'shut up about the bloody badger' though :lol:

 

None of them have ever seen a live badger either and they are rather jealous ha ha ... they will all be camping outside my house in their cars now as they were amazed and want to see the badger and the fox too now OMG what have I said.  :lol:

 

.....does anyone know how far badgers usually venture from their sets please and has anyone else seen any locally ?

 

Mmmm maybe I should have started a new topic in a better section so more people see it.... might do that actually 

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Moore Nature Reserve used to be a good place to walk energetic dogs!

Before that it was a sand quarry, drained canal, and it is right next door to the council rubbish dump.

There is now a ban on walking dogs there without leads.

Before this Council ban we used to walk there freely with our enegetic dogs and we all saw and enjoyed a whole lot of urban wildlife.

My opinion is that it is a shame that Waste Management (who own and control the site) have introduced these very silly rules?

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Moore Nature Reserve used to be a good place to walk energetic dogs!

Before that it was a sand quarry, drained canal, and it is right next door to the council rubbish dump.

There is now a ban on walking dogs there without leads.

Before this Council ban we used to walk there freely with our enegetic dogs and we all saw and enjoyed a whole lot of urban wildlife.

My opinion is that it is a shame that Waste Management (who own and control the site) have introduced these very silly rules?

 

 

Fenton!! FENTON!!! FENTON!!!! - remember that , notorious video of the Labrador chasing deer.  I had the misfortune to see a pair of dingbats , in Dunham Massy Deer Park, walking along amused by the fact that their dog was chasing deer there ( I informed them they were d***heads and called over a National Trust Warden )

 

 

Okay, there may not be deer  in Moon Nature Reserve  but a free-running dog can still cause damage to wildlife - e.g. ground-nesting birds.

 

 

There is also the unfortunate fact that you have to take account of the irresponsible pet owner, which means restricting the activities of others. 

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Ok I agree with everything Nick has said above.

I am, and always have been, a lover of nature.

 But there are also a heck of a lot of responsible dog lovers out here and responsible dog lovers know that dogs need exercise, as do their owners.

I would never let my dog run wild where there are deer or sheep (only an irresponsible dog owner would) and my dog is not called Fenton.

The point I am trying to make, however, is that Moore Nature Reserve had co-existed as a reserve for nature and an agreeable and acceptable place to walk a dog for decades before these (silly) restrictions about keeping a dog on it's lead were introduced.

Where, in this area, are dogs now supposed to be exercised without putting them in a car and driving somewhere else, and therefore adding to global warming?

Incidentally, when my dog was young she brought down a couple of rabbits at Moore Nature Reserve.

The rabbits there are prolific and, after the ban on dogs, their breeding in out of control until myxomatosis kills some of them.

Have you ever seen how much a rabbit dying from myxomatosis suffers?

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I know where your coming from RC as back in time I used to spend time at my great aunts who lived in a house at Bob's Bridge that was situated at the west end of what is now the reserve, it was by the bridge on the side of the Old Quay canal which although defunct as a waterway still had water in it, that whole area was known as Moss Side (still is) and consisted mainley of gorse and broom bushes with a few silver birch trees, and was a young lads paradise to play on, they used to hold motorbike scrambleing races there occasionally, what I'm trying to say it was a wild area even in the 1940's and 50's with a large variety of wild life even then, if my memory serves me correctly there were no lakes there, I think they were man made I presume by this wate management company. One thing back in those days was that a farmer Perc Lear or Leah used to keep sheep on there and if he saw any dog running wild he would shoot it without hesitation.  Personally I think it is af antastic improvement on what it was previously and to be honest I'm amazed that they allow dogs on there at all.

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No reply to my opinion about Moore Nature reserve then?

Nick Tessla for instance?

I think stupid people are making far too much of the idea that nature in Warrington is a new thing and that, therefore, dogs and dog walkers should now be banned from their natural and historic exercising areas.

I have walked around here for the last 50 years and have enjoyed looking at everything natural.

FENTON is such a ridiculous example!

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No reply to my opinion about Moore Nature reserve then?

Nick Tessla for instance?

I think stupid people are making far too much of the idea that nature in Warrington is a new thing and that, therefore, dogs and dog walkers should now be banned from their natural and historic exercising areas.

I have walked around here for the last 50 years and have enjoyed looking at everything natural.

FENTON is such a ridiculous example!

 

Calm down Rocky, there are plenty of people whose dogs have behaved like  Fenton who would swear blind that their dogs would never behave like Fenton - and then resort to  call everyone else stupid, and worse,  when they object. They may also claim that their dog is able to avoid causing damage to sensitive area of flora, ground-nesting birds etc.

 

 

Unfortunately, Fenton is not a "ridiculous" example - or even an extreme one.

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