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Cooking on the curriculum


Lucy
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So the Government thinks putting cooking on the curriculum will solve the problem of child obesity!

Surely it would be more beneficial if mothers gave their children proper food?

I know it is tempting for a working mother to buy ready-prepared meals, or even, for God's sake, go to the takeaway. But my view is that if a working mother hasn't the energy or capacity to work and STILL cook proper meals for her children, she shouldn't be working.

I know it is not a fashionable viewpoint these days, but I still believe a mother's place is at home, at least until her children are in their teens. Unless, of course, she can organise her working life so that it doesn't prevent her from looking after her children properly, like some women can.

 

[ 22.01.2008, 14:56: Message edited by: Lucy ]

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Lucy, just one question.

 

How can mothers give their children proper food unless they themselves have been taught how to cook it.

 

The problem is that many parents don't know how to cook and that's why they resort to takeaways and ready meals.

 

For once I agree with the government.

 

I seem to remember that cooking was always part of a school curriculum years ago but only for girls, while lads did woodwork or metalwork.

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Keith is spot on the problem hasn't just occurred over night and cooking lesson aren't the only part of the solution but a vital first step.

 

These days some mums can't even boil an egg.

 

My son was fortunate to attend a school were he learnt to cook and his meals are excellent, he understands the ingredients and what they bring to the meal and do for the body. I on the other hand am still learning - I'm having to as I now a house husband - my college days cooking isn't appreciated so I am getting castigated by the family who are shaming and coaching me to better results - after all they have to eat the stuff.

 

[ 22.01.2008, 11:35: Message edited by: Student Geoff ]

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Do you really have to know how to cook? how hard can steamed vedgies be? you just add water and stick a fork in to test. Raw fruits and nuts. Dried apricots, dates, almonds etc. etc. All tasty, dosn't go off, kids like the taste, especially mixed dried fruit and nuts, filling and healthy. I have had 5 children, spent very little time in the kitchen, none of them are overweight, all healthy adults. Nothing easier than something you don't have to cook and nothing fattening about it either.

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In the past, many schools did teach cookery, particularly girls' schools. But any mother who can't cook today should blame her own mother, not the education system.

First thing to learn is, don't do your fresh food shopping in a supermarket. Find a decent butcher and greengrocer. There are still a few left!

If you don't know what to ask for, ask the butcher - he'll be able to advise and the meat you buy will be so much better than the pre-packed stuff you get in a supermarket. And not much more expensive.

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I pride myself I'm a good cook. Both my daughters are good cooks too and so is my son (my daughter-in-law leaves it to him as he's better at it). Why are we good cooks? Because my mother was. She never gave me a "lesson" and I never gave my children one. When young, I helped in the kitchen while meals were prepared and the skills accumulated, the same happened with my children.

 

Have all the people who have lost the art of making a tasty, wholesome meal come from a long line of people who couldn't cook? There must have been a time, way back before even the Chip Shop arrived on the scene, when folks must have cooked or they didn't survive. Did the Chippy and the Pie Shop really take over to such an extent that the mothers and grandmothers of today's generation hardly bothered?

 

I quite enjoy the odd fish 'n' chips meal, love an occasional Chinese take-away, but cooking a plain meal is so easy, so enjoyable and so much better than ready-made I find myself amazed that people don't make the effort. Perhaps if they knew what they were missing.....which may be where the cooking lessons become valuable.

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As usual we are being fed excuses by the government rather than solutions. Schools should be spending their time educating children in the skills that only they can (the famous 3 r's) and sport (for fitness) leaving the basic life skills (cooking, keeping clean, housekeeping, shopping) to the parents. I live alone now and certainly don't survive on take-aways. In fact I only ever eat home cooked (by me) meals or, rarely, at a restaurant with friends as a treat. My cooking skills were picked up from my mother and my wife, and theirs were picked up from their mothers. What is wrong with people today that they have to be shown the basics of everything all the time. God help them when the excrement hits the whirling thing and Macdonalds is hit by a nuclear device. :scared: :scared: :scared:

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Originally posted by Steve the original:

I Had cooking lessons in school and it didnt teach me anything,I was taught by my mother and the rest i recieved by trial and error...

 

Anyone had a green mint flavoured cake?? :D

 

 

Steve

Can you cook anything beside scouse and xmas dinner?

:wink:

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Originally posted by Peter:

Originally posted by Steve the original:

I Had cooking lessons in school and it didnt teach me anything,I was taught by my mother and the rest i recieved by trial and error...

 

Anyone had a green mint flavoured cake?? :D

 

 

Steve

Can you cook anything beside scouse and xmas dinner?

:wink:

Yes of course.... burnt boiled egg on burnt toast!

 

Tip: use lots of Ketchup to smother the taste!

 

Steve

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Originally posted by observer:

"taught by my mother/wife " etc: and I bet Mum wasn't driven into a job, thus having the time AT HOME, to pass on her skills. :o

Fewer women really need to work than actually do. I didn't return to work until my youngest child was 10 years old (and her father was working from home). We didn't have holidays abroad, I had a car but it was an ancient Hillman Minx (he had a company car) the Joneses kept a step ahead of us but my children were more important. So many work for the "trappings" but make it sound vital.
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Agreed Kate: I would hope that the re-inclusion od "cooking" into the school curriculum, will also include healthy eating guidance and of course the value of exercise -(providing there are still any school playing fields left, or they are allowed to engage in real sports like rugby; or the streets are safe enough at night for parents to allow the kids out to exercise) :(

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They took cooking out of the curriculum, there must have been a reason?

 

I do not think the school system should teach cooking - they have health class don't they?

 

Also to add fuel to the fire Observer - I had to work, no one else to share the load of bills and clothing for my sons. I cooked early in the morning and late at night. My sons also cook - as a matter of fact both of their wives tell me that my sons are better cooks than them.

 

It comes down to presence in the home, practical thinking and sharing time with your children in the kitchen. SHUT OFF THE DAMN TV AND COMPUTER

 

[ 22.01.2008, 23:50: Message edited by: Mary ]

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This is another example of joined up government NOT!! In the same breath, almost, they announce that children are to be forced to learn cooking at school AND metal detectors are to be installed at school entrances so the pupils can be relieved of their knives before entering. So what are they going to use to chop up the veggies then?? :roll::roll:

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Just pleased my schooling commenced in 1961 and finished in 1974, looking back it was a most enjoyable time with plenty of health and safety hazards to overcome and dangers to be experienced...even managed to be shot in the leg with a lead pellet from an air pistol in the sports changing room, all part of the everyday rough and tumble of what was a traditional boys grammar school. :D:D:D

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Blowing up the science lab, well a big bang! got the cane for that. Cutting half through the legs of a chair in woodwork got the cane for that. Forgot the cakes in the oven got the cane for that.

Despite all that I am now brilliant at all them skills and I learnt a lot at school. Still wish that I had learnt a bit more but ~ ~ Health and safety !! risk assessment !! I don?t think that it had been invented. Most of the time we learnt by our mistakes and the teachers were quite prepared to let us make them so that we could see the consequences of our actions.

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