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7. Building the Manchester Ship Canal.


algy
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Dredger Barry being viewed by members of the public.

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No ship yard required, building the stern of a dredger on site.

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Dredger Bollin under construction at on the bottom of the canal at Millbank.

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Dredger Manchester at Pool Hall Cutting.

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Tipping spoil to make an earth dam across the canal.

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Concrete mixing machine at Eastham.

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Advertisement for the sale by auction of 50 horses surplus to requirements.

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Eastham Locks Entrance from the Mersey.

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Eastham Locks Post & Telegraph Office.

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Eastham Locks Staff.

z0103_EasthamLocksStaff.jpg

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Captain Birdseye in his younger days I see! I know it's been said before but it's astounding what they achieved with the technology they had available. I hadn't even thought about them using horses.

Call me naive but I never imagine them have a high volume concrete mixing machine not unlike those that use to produce concrete for the concrete mix delivery vehicles of today!.

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Blimey Algy.... if you post any more pictures of the ship canal being built, we could join them together and make a video!!! :D

There are a total of 620, if you take out the 70 already shown on here and around 40 that are either duplicated or what I would consider as totally uninteresting there are about 510 to go, so brace yourself Baz!. :wink:

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Loving every one of them Algy so you keep going you are doing a teriffic job :D

 

A completely different world than what we see in todays construction industry and the working lives of all people from that era for that matter.

 

Every old picture you post seems to tells it's own story even without your fantastic extra information.

 

I wonder if in 100 years from now people will look back on our working and daily lives with quite the same level of interest.

 

I doubt it somehow but maybe they will, who knows. One things for sure we wont be around to know if they ever do <_<

 

Bugger !!!

 

PS I might take a picture of the pile driver which drove me mad all day yesterday and which then woke me up a 7.45 am this morning as it started all over again.

 

Maybe in 100 years they will have found a quieter way to do it or learnt from our mistakes that mass building (especially on unstabe ground and/or possible flood points) was not a good idea :D

 

PS that is relevant to the topic as the pile driving is happening on the banks of the MSC :wink:

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Loving every one of them Algy so you keep going you are doing a teriffic job :D

 

A completely different world than what we see in todays construction industry and the working lives of all people from that era for that matter.

 

Every old picture you post seems to tells it's own story even without your fantastic extra information.

 

I wonder if in 100 years from now people will look back on our working and daily lives with quite the same level of interest.

 

I doubt it somehow but maybe they will, who knows. One things for sure we wont be around to know if they ever do <_<

 

Bugger !!!

 

PS I might take a picture of the pile driver which drove me mad all day yesterday and which then woke me up a 7.45 am this morning as it started all over again.

 

Maybe in 100 years they will have found a quieter way to do it or learnt from our mistakes that mass building (especially on unstabe ground and/or possible flood points) was not a good idea :D

 

PS that is relevant to the topic as the pile driving is happening on the banks of the MSC :wink:

 

Thanks Dizz, I sometimes think that because those folk of yesteryear wore different clothing and didn't have the advantages and luxuries that we have today that we tend to see them as lesser mortals, to me, they are a bit like the Romans in the film "Life of Brian" without there existence we would not have the technology that we have today, anyway getting late for me now, off up the 'wooden dancers', so to speak!, have a hard job really as we live in a bungalow. :wink::D :grin:

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:lol::lol: Even bungalows have lofts Algy so be careful as Mrs Algy might one day relegate you to to the upper levels with a portable ladder which she will the remove... your computer would of course remain on the lower levels just to frustrate you :wink:

 

I don't see the people in all your pictures as being lesser mortals at all. I see them as being far more able and determined than many people of today and I'm sure that a lot of us could learn an awful lot from them if they were still around.

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It has been said that, when some agricultural workers "joined up" to work as navigational engineers, they only lasted about a quarter of a day as the trained ones could work so much harder for much longer. It, apparently, took a full year of training to qualify for the job, but the pay was good and they lived on quality meat.

This is also why the American Railroad companies imported so many Irish navvies to build their system.

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