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2. Thelwall.


algy
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Many of these photograph’s may be available

from the Warrington Museum/Library and will

be of far superior quality to those viewed here.

Anyone having any issue with the displaying

of these photographs due to copyright or

ownership infringement please contact me either by PM.

or through the Moderators and I shall

remove them immediately.

 

Highfield House, Weaste Lane, Thelwall, this was the family home of the Rylands family

ThelwallWeasteLaneHighfield-sideview.jpg

 

Highfield House.

ThelwallWeasteLaneHighfield-rearview.jpg

 

One of Highfields many rooms, the library I would guess!.

1890sThelwallWeasteLaneHighfield-thelibrary.jpg

 

The Rylands family in the garden.

1890sThelwallWeasteLaneHighfield-theRylandsfamilyinthegarden.jpg

 

Highfields stable block (left).

1890sThelwallWeasteLaneHighfields-thestablesleft.jpg

 

A posed group of school children in the centre of the village, the Pickering Arms right, the Post Office left.

ThelwallVillagebythePickeringArms.jpg

 

Another view of the village centre, minus children.

ThelwallVillage.jpg

 

The Pickering Arms.

ThelwallThePickeringArms.jpg

 

Half Acre Lane canal underbridge, apart from the cobbles and gas lamp, the same as it is today.

ThelwallHalfAcreLaneCanalBridge.jpg

 

Garland Hall on Weaste Lane, long gone.

ThelwallGarlandHallWeasteLane.jpg

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Highfield was the home of J Paul Rylands, an eminent historian, prolific writer on local issues and astronomer, he apparently used the turret as an observatory, I believe there was a fire and some of the original building was demolished. Part of Highfield is still there, converted into flats. Incidentally, Thelwall Grange, now a private nursing home, belonged to another Rylands brother. He gave it to the town to be used as a convalescent home during WW2, it closed in the 70's (I think) Massey Hall, in Half Acre Lane, was built by one of his other brothers.

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Joe, Welcome to the forum and some really interesting information, just what we need, someone with local knowledge that is willing to share it, although I display the photos I struggle at times providing information to questions that are asked, keep the good work up!. :wink:

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Highfield was the home of J Paul Rylands, an eminent historian, prolific writer on local issues and astronomer, he apparently used the turret as an observatory, I believe there was a fire and some of the original building was demolished. Part of Highfield is still there, converted into flats. Incidentally, Thelwall Grange, now a private nursing home, belonged to another Rylands brother. He gave it to the town to be used as a convalescent home during WW2, it closed in the 70's (I think) Massey Hall, in Half Acre Lane, was built by one of his other brothers.

 

 

Thanks Joe..... which road is the part of Highfield house still on?

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Thanks Joe..... which road is the part of Highfield house still on?

 

Weaste Lane, heading towards the M6 turn first left off the A50 (Knutsford Road) after the traffic lights, turn left under the Cliffe Lane canal underbridge, the site of Cuerden Hall is 100 yards on the right (Cuerdon Drive) and Highfield is half a mile further down the road also on the right

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Weaste Lane, heading towards the M6 turn first left off the A50 (Knutsford Road) after the traffic lights, turn left under the Cliffe Lane canal underbridge, the site of Cuerden Hall is 100 yards on the right (Cuerdon Drive) and Highfield is half a mile further down the road also on the right

The map below shows the location of Highfields and Cuerden hall.

 

weastlane.jpg

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As already said 'Welcome to the forum Joe' and great to read your posts with the additional info on Algy's wonderful photo uploads :D

 

I don't know the Thelwall area too well (despite not living too far from there) so all this is certainly widening my local knowledge and interests :D

 

Looking forward to reading more from you :D

 

Were the Rylands you refer to related to the Rylands who owned the Wire Works and Peter Rylands who was mayor of Warrington in 1853 ?

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Were the Rylands you refer to related to the Rylands who owned the Wire Works and Peter Rylands who was mayor of Warrington in 1853 ?

 

The very same family Dizz.

 

Peter Rylands lived at Massey Hall in Half Acre Lane.

________________________________________

 

Thomas Glazebrook Rylands lived at Highfields.

 

1881.Census

 

Dwelling: Weaste Lane Highfields

Census Place: Thelwall, Cheshire, England

 

Thomas G. RYLANDS M 62 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Head

Occ: Retired Iron Manufacturer

 

Elizabeth RYLANDS M 42 F Preston, Lancashire, England

Rel: Wife

 

John Paul RYLANDS U 35 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Retired Iron Manufacturer

 

Rachel D. RYLANDS U 18 F Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Daur

 

Martha G. RYLANDS U 8 F Thelwall, Cheshire, England

Rel: Daur

_____________________________________________

 

John Rylands lived at Thelwall Grange, Massey Brook Lane (a continuation of Weaste Lane).

 

1881 Census

 

Dwelling: Massey Brook Lane, The Grange.

Census Place: Thelwall, Cheshire, England

 

John RYLANDS M 66 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Head

Occ: J.P.Dividends Etc

 

Annie RYLANDS M 34 F Hull, York, England

Rel: Wife

 

Edward G. RYLANDS U 33 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Tanner Master

 

Mabel RYLANDS U 6 m F Thelwall, Cheshire, England

Rel: Daur

________________________________________

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The very same family Dizz.

 

Peter Rylands lived at Massey Hall in Half Acre Lane.

________________________________________

 

Thomas Glazebrook Rylands lived at Highfields.

 

1881.Census

 

Dwelling: Weaste Lane Highfields

Census Place: Thelwall, Cheshire, England

 

Thomas G. RYLANDS M 62 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Head

Occ: Retired Iron Manufacturer

 

Elizabeth RYLANDS M 42 F Preston, Lancashire, England

Rel: Wife

 

John Paul RYLANDS U 35 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Retired Iron Manufacturer

 

Rachel D. RYLANDS U 18 F Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Daur

 

Martha G. RYLANDS U 8 F Thelwall, Cheshire, England

Rel: Daur

_____________________________________________

 

John Rylands lived at Thelwall Grange, Massey Brook Lane (a continuation of Weaste Lane), and was the founder of the John Ryland Library, Manchester.

 

1881 Census

 

Dwelling: Massey Brook Lane, The Grange.

Census Place: Thelwall, Cheshire, England

 

John RYLANDS M 66 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Head

Occ: J.P.Dividends Etc

 

Annie RYLANDS M 34 F Hull, York, England

Rel: Wife

 

Edward G. RYLANDS U 33 M Warrington, Lancashire, England

Rel: Son

Occ: Tanner Master

 

Mabel RYLANDS U 6 m F Thelwall, Cheshire, England

Rel: Daur

________________________________________

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Sorry Algy, John Rylands from Warrington did not found the John Rylands library in Manchester. It was built and opened in 1899, in memory of her late husband, by Enriqueta Augustina Rylands, the widow(and third wife) of John Rylands the largest textile manufacturer in the country and major shareholder of the Manchester Ship Canal Co.who died in 1888. He lived at Longford Park, Stretford and may have been related to the Warrington Rylands' as his family originated in St. Helens.

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Sorry Algy, John Rylands from Warrington did not found the John Rylands library in Manchester. It was built and opened in 1899, in memory of her late husband, by Enriqueta Augustina Rylands, the widow(and third wife) of John Rylands the largest textile manufacturer in the country and major shareholder of the Manchester Ship Canal Co.who died in 1888. He lived at Longford Park, Stretford and may have been related to the Warrington Rylands' as his family originated in St. Helens.

I stand corrected Joe, I shall edit my post. :oops:

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In the 18th century Rylands were sail makers in Howley, they were sweatshops known as the

Howley Hell Hole, prior to going into the wire industry with Nathaniel Greening.

It's claimed that sail cloth made by Rylands was used to make the sails that took Nelson to France and half the sailcloth in the british navy was produced in Warrington.:)

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In the 18th century Rylands were sail makers in Howley, they were sweatshops known as the

Howly Hell Hole, prior to going into the wire industry with Nathaniel Greenwood.

It's claimed that sail cloth made by Rylands was used to make the sails that took Nelson to France and half the sailcloth in the british navy was produced in Warrington.:)

 

I was in Amlwch (Anglesey) recently, doing more research on my Great, Great Grandfather who was a sailmaker there in the late 1800's. In the old sail loft, now converted to tea rooms, mention is made that most of the sailcloth used came from Warrington.

 

I vaguely remember in the late Ian Sellar's book on the industries of Warrington, he refers to the vast bleaching fields at Howley, where the sailcloth was spread out in the sun to whiten naturally. I also recall reading somewhere that there was a "Sailcloth Yard" at the bottom end of Bridge Street.

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I was in Amlwch (Anglesey) recently, doing more research on my Great, Great Grandfather who was a sailmaker there in the late 1800's. In the old sail loft, now converted to tea rooms, mention is made that most of the sailcloth used came from Warrington.

 

I vaguely remember in the late Ian Sellar's book on the industries of Warrington, he refers to the vast bleaching fields at Howley, where the sailcloth was spread out in the sun to whiten naturally. I also recall reading somewhere that there was a "Sailcloth Yard" at the bottom end of Bridge Street.

Probably this area Joe!, called 'Ship Yard' and 'Lower Ship Yard' to the west of Bridge Street at the lower end.

 

ScreenShot007.jpg

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Thanks you for the information on Massey Hall. My wife worke there for a number of years while it was owned by Lancashire County Council Education Department. It was sold off about five years ago, but no-one seemed to know what was going to happen to it subsequently.

A great shame, as it was a fantastic building which had suffered a lot from the "naughty children" who were educated there.

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  • 2 years later...

I know that this is a very old posting, but I'm new to the Forum and have just gone looking through old items to see what might be of interest.

 

On the subject of Highfields on Waste Lane:

 

Thomas Glazebrook Rylands (1818 - 1900) had a very good telescope (a 5 inch Cooke) set up in that observatory which is so noticeable on photos of the house.  It seems that in old age the climb up to the observatory was too difficult and he gave the telescope to the Liverpool Astronomical Society in 1893 - I believe it is now in the collection of the Liverpool Museum.

 

I think someone suggested that Highfields was burnt down.  It was not fire that did the damage, but water - and a lot of it.  The Rylands family sold the house in 1907 after the death of the widowed Mrs Rylands in 1906.  It was apparently purchased by the Boddington family (yes, the brewers) and they suffered two family in the two years following. I don't know when they moved out but in 1914 the Kelly's Directory states that a 'Mrs Smith' is resident at Highfields. It can't have been long after this that the house was left unoccupied.  The agent responsible for it failed to turn off the water supply.  There followed a harsh winter - unheated house - frozen pipes and an almost inevitable deluge through the main part of the house.  It appears that whoever owned the house was unable or unwilling to pay for extensive repairs. The house fell victim to wood rot.  I don't know when the house was demolished - perhaps the 1930s?

 

The part of the house which remains standing was essentially the service wing and it did not suffer any water damage.  During WW1 my great grandparents were living in one of the cottages on Waste Lane.  Mr Cooke the farmer needed a labourer to assist in the vital industry of food production.  The labourer needed accommodation and my family were told that they would have to vacate the cottage - agricultural workers having greater priority than tannery workers (gt granddad worked at the tannery on Knutsford Road).  They were offered some of the rooms in the surviving service wing at Highfields and they remained there for a number of years.  We have a photo of great grandmother sat in what had been the Servants' Hall.  When their eldest daughter (my grandmother) got married in 1922  the wedding photos were taken with everyone standing outside the service wing.  She returned to her parent's home for her first confinement, so my Dad was born in Highfields in 1924.

 

Hope this is of interest to some!

 

Susan

 

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Hi Susan and welcome to the forum :D  

Thanks for the information and that was really interesting to read.   I'd love to see the photo's you have of it as I;m rather obsessed bit local history and old photos although I fully understand if you'd prefer not to post any with them having your  family members on.

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Hello,

 

I just re-read my posting and realised that I had missed out the word 'bereavement' when referring to the Boddington family.  They lost two members of the family soon after moving to Thelwall.  The head of the household (and chairman of the board at Boddington's Brewery) was William Slater Boddington who died in 1908 and eldest son Henry died the following year.  The funeral for W S Boddington was quite a big affair with plenty of write-ups in the Manchester newspapers.  A special train was laid on to transport those attending the funeral from Manchester to Thelwall with a return service later the same day.  It must have been a spectacle for the locals in this small village - all those grand city folks turning up one afternoon!

 

As to photos of Highfields, we have the set of Rylands photos which I know have been posted here before and a few family ones.  I'm happy to post them here - all the people are dead now and I'm sure their descendants wouldn't mind. 

 

First photo was taken inside Highfields - the Servants' Hall with my great grandmother Mrs Jane Bradburn (nee Morgan, but called Davies - her mother Ellen Holt had an 'interesting' life).  This was probably taken in the 1920s and I still have the flower vase you see in the middle of the table. 

 

The second is the group wedding photo of Ellen Bradburn (my grandmother). Behind the bride stands her Uncle Henry who, rather disturbingly, bears a resemblance to a well know German dictator.  Next to Henry is his daughter, Edith Constance.  Just the other day I found a Warrington Guardian article from a few years ago which mentions her.  Connie Bradburn was a teacher and later headmistress at Thelwall Village School.  She ran the local Girl Guides and her brother Geoff was a Scout leader (boy seated on the ground).  This picture was taken outside the south front of Highfields.

post-13045-0-18558600-1430660759_thumb.jpg

post-13045-0-42704100-1430660800_thumb.jpg

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