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4. The last of Horsemarket Street & Miscellaneous.


algy
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Market Gate looked a dangerous place to be with all those vans and busses using the narrow road and junctions, if indeed the had junctions, or was it the responsibility of the police man to try and keep traffic flowing safely ?

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One or two killed by traffic in Sankey Street in my lifetime. That was a so narrow street, with two way traffic. Still is, I suppose, in part but now traffic free. :blink::huh:

When my older sister took me into town she would always tell me in Sankey Street DON'T step off the pavement to let anybody pass!

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Quite right Cleo. I dealt with several trapped ankles from people stepping off the pavement near to Trinity church.

 

Interesting to see a single policeman on point duty. In my day we had four. In my earlier times people would respectfully wait for perhaps two minutes to be waved across. Over the years they got less patient

 

The four points were called as in the compass and there was a system to get the maximum vehicles through, but that was stymied when pedestrians wouldn't wait their turn, and of course traffic got heavier.

 

Just to add, there was no offence of a pedestrian not obeying a PC's signal, (the public never knew that and were controlled by bluff). Obviously there was for a bike or motor vehicle.

 

Happy days

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As Dizzy said Harry, thanks it is interesting to hear your experiences, I'm sure this has been said on here before, but you really should publish the story of your life in the Police Force, not being pessimistic but if you don't the memories will disappear!.

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Algy,

Doubt the general interest in personal anecdotes, which my memoirs are mainly consist of. They are already in the library (vaults I would guess).

 

Try this for one -

Since I was old enough, people always said "You're a big lad. Why don't you join the police?". This was when it was a much respected job with an early pension, and you had to be a 6 footer to join Warrington Borough Police.

 

When I left the army it was back to my plum job in the works accounts at Crosfields, but after the army it was stale beer. Two PCs I knew from the army were playing for three local cricket teams and this seemed like the perfect life to me. They said the police was a good life, and we had our own magnificent sports ground. I didn't know the chief Constable made no concession to sport and they were punishing their bodies to take part.

 

One day at Crosfields (1954), George Bramhall and myself were fed up, so we decided to go down to the Police Station at 2 o'clock and apply to join up. We filled in the forms; got weighed; and sat down to the entrance exam. My two friends told me that they always asked the size of a standard house-brick and another known one, which now eludes me. There were two other simple questions.

They sent us to Dr Bowdens in Bold street and when we returned it was inferred that subject to character and reference checks, we were in. All that in just 2 hours.

 

I heard nothing for a fortnight. About 11.30pm one night, an envelope plopped through the letter box of 39 East Avenue (the borough police didn't waste money on stamps). I had been accepted. Report to Arpley street on such a date, and see the Chief Constable.

 

Happy days

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