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5. Bridge St, Rylands St & Friars gate.


algy
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1908. The widening has been completed with tram lines installed, these terminate at Patten Lane opposite the Scotch Wool & Hosiery Store.

1908WarringtonBridgeStreet.jpg

 

1908. Viewed from Market Gate.

1908WarringtonBridgeStreetlookingtowardBridgeFoot.jpg

 

1910. One of Warringtons oldest public houses is destroyed by fire, 'The Crow Inn' No.3 Bridge Street, the pub did not face on to the main street. it was accessed down a side passageway. Alderman Arthur Bennett surveys the roof damage with perhaps the landlord?.

1910May17thTheOldCrowafterburningdown.jpg

 

1910. A view of the old Seven Stars yard awaiting demolition, this area would be cleared and the Royal Oak would be built on the site.

1910SevenStarsYardlatertheRoyalOakYardawaitingdemolition.jpg

 

1910. A tram waiting at the Bridge Street terminus almost ready to depart to Stockton Heath. The entrance to Patten Lane is on the left.

1910.jpg

 

1911. A new visitor to Bridge Street, perhaps the driver has gone to buy a can of petrol from J.S.Garland's motor shop on the right. Lone sharks were around even in those days as the advertisement states on the side of the tram!.

1911BridgeStreet.jpg

 

A cropped and edited a section of the last photo to illustrate how busy the town was on a typical shopping day, unlike today, shoppers stop in the street to converse with each other.

1910AbusyBridgeStreet.jpg

 

1912. Tearing down old property to make way for new shops, all that remains of the 'Crow Inn' is the exposed site to the left of the horse and cart.

1912DemolishingbuildingsontheeastsideofBridgeStreet.jpg

 

1920. Bridge Street from Market Gate, the tram lines now continue all the way up Bridge street and into Buttermarket Street.

1920BridgeStfromMarketGate.jpg

 

1920. The Circus comes to town, the animals parading past the Royal Oak public house.

1920CircusparadepassingtheRoyalOakBridgeSt.jpg

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Great as usual Algy.

 

Re: the 3rd pic of the two men stood on 'The Crow Inn'.... I've seen that many times but I didn't realise it was destroyed by fire I always thought it was simply demolished as part of road widening scheme.

 

Leart something new again, cheers Algy.

 

PS The Alderman Arthur Bennett was my grandads cousin :D

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Great as usual Algy.

 

Re: the 3rd pic of the two men stood on 'The Crow Inn'.... I've seen that many times but I didn't realise it was destroyed by fire I always thought it was simply demolished as part of road widening scheme.

 

Leart something new again, cheers Algy.

 

PS The Alderman Arthur Bennett was my grandads cousin :D

1910May17thTheOldCrowafterburningdown.jpg

Dizz, if you look to the right of the doorway there is a wattle panel, this would be have been there from the original building and used extensively before bricks were available for general building work, only important dwellings were built of brick the ordinary houses had walls consisting of wattle and daub, the whole panel being the wattle and made up off vertical staves made predominately of oak, but hazel, holly, birch, alder and ash were also used. the horizontal twigs called withies were made mainly from hazel and woven around the staves in a basket weave, the daub would have been made from clay only, or with lime plaster added, or lome that is tempered with animal hair or straw and animal dung. This may indicate that part of 'The Crow Inn was built in the 17th or even the 16th century as in the 17th century it was rapidly becoming unpopular due to fire risk.

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Great as usual Algy.

 

Re: the 3rd pic of the two men stood on 'The Crow Inn'.... I've seen that many times but I didn't realise it was destroyed by fire I always thought it was simply demolished as part of road widening scheme.

 

Leart something new again, cheers Algy.

 

PS The Alderman Arthur Bennett was my grandads cousin :D

 

Lucky you! I searched to see if Alderman Bennett was on my tree but no, he's a bit too posh for my lot.

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Lucky you! I searched to see if Alderman Bennett was on my tree but no, he's a bit too posh for my lot.

 

Never be too sure Tracey as I only know he was on my mums side due to some notes she wrote in pencil in one of the books produced by the museum :wink: I must remember to try and tie up that side of the tree fully when I have time.

 

It was a habit of mums to write pencil notes in the books she bought and read as the museum had published quite a few photo's and info of hers after she lent various things to of their employees in good faith (who shall remain nameless). To make it worse she never got any of her things back by the way. Anyway as such mum often liked to write little corrections and family notes in the margins of their books after she bought them to 'correct' them privately :wink:

 

I seem to recall that Alderman Bennett also produced some maps and info which were in a book/doccumet that Algy once referred to on here as being the 'Legh Manuscripts'.

 

Legh? or maybe a mispelling of Leigh?... coincidence in your case maybe :blink:

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I seem to recall that Alderman Bennett also produced some maps and info which were in a book/doccumet that Algy once referred to on here as being the 'Legh Manuscripts'.

 

Legh? or maybe a mispelling of Leigh?... coincidence in your case maybe :blink:

 

Dizz, me'love. methinks you may be getting your wires crossed, Arthur Bennett wrote " The Dreams of a Warringtonian" where he quoted the Legh Manuscripts, however here is a link to -

"Warrington in M.CCCC.LXV as described in a contemporary rent roll of the Legh family, in the possession of Thomas Legh, Esquire, of Lyme Park (1849)"

author - William Beamont.1797? -1889, downloadable as a pdf.

 

http://archive.org/details/warringtoninmccc00beamrich

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Dizzy - you've just sent me off to spend another morning lost to the Cheshire Parish Records to see if I can fill any gaps!

 

I found Alderman Bennett's Grandfather on the Census records, he was William Bennett a farmer born in Walton. My family were also farmers around Walton and Hatton about the right time and we have a lot of Williams on our tree. I've spent many a painful hour untangling them all, he's definitely not in my direct line but common sense tells me with the same name, occupation and location there must be a connection albeit a distant one.

 

It's possible we're related!

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Dizzy - you've just sent me off to spend another morning lost to the Cheshire Parish Records to see if I can fill any gaps!

 

I found Alderman Bennett's Grandfather on the Census records, he was William Bennett a farmer born in Walton. My family were also farmers around Walton and Hatton about the right time and we have a lot of Williams on our tree. I've spent many a painful hour untangling them all, he's definitely not in my direct line but common sense tells me with the same name, occupation and location there must be a connection albeit a distant one.

 

It's possible we're related!

Tracey, you don't know what your letting yourself in for! :wink::D :grin: :D

There are still Bennett's farming Hollyhedge farm on the main Chester to Warrington Road at Higher Walton, the area where the farm is used to be called Acton grange.

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Maybe I should've kept quiet :D:wink:

 

Interesting about Hollyhedge Farm - you're encyclopedic Algy, is there anything you don't know about Warrington??!

Tracey, there is more I don't know about Warrington than I do, I do have a knack of worming information out though, plus being brought up in Latchford and Lower Walton, going to school in Stockton Heath, having grand parents and other relatives in Moore, serving my apprenticeship in the smithy at Daresbury and working from there out on the many farms in the area, then having lived in Thelwall and Grappenhall for all of 50 years has probably given me a pretty good basic knowledge of the area. :wink::D :grin:

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