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3. Bridge St, Rylands St & Friars gate.


algy
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TO ENLARGE A PHOTO LEFT CLICK ON IT.

 

c1900. Dolmans Lane east of Bridge Street.

1900sDolmansLaneeastofBridgeStreet.jpg

 

c1900. Hodgkinson's old premises about to be demolished for the widening of Bridge Street.

1900sHodgkinsonsoldpremisesandshopsbyDolmansLane001.jpg

 

c1900. Knocking down working class houses in the slum area of Dolmans Lane.

1900sKnockingdownworkingclasshousesinDolmansLane.jpg

 

1900. Looking up Bridge Street.

1900sLookingupBridgeStreet001.jpg

 

1900. Looking up Bridge Street, 10.15am on a sunny morning. (Cropped & enlarged section of the above photo).

1900sLookingupBridgeStreet011.jpg

 

c1900. Mr William brown the Pub Landlord showing off a Shire horse to demonstrate the high standard of stabling to admiring onlookers outside the old Seven Stars Inn at the lower end of Bridge Street (right hand side looking up).

1900sSevenStarsBridgeStreet.jpg

 

c1900, A narrow court off Bridge Street, these dwellings were barely habitable, washing lines that rarely saw sunshine, buildings holding each other up with timber props placed between them and cast iron wall plates preventing house walls from collapsing.

1900sAnarrowcourtyardoffBridgeStreet.jpg

 

c1900. Yet another example of the squalid conditions that some of the 'working class' Warrington town dwellers lived in.

1900sBridgeStreetareapoorlivingconditions.jpg

 

c1900. The opposite end of the scale to the previous photo, affluent theatre goers attending a show at the new palace Hippodrome in Friars Gate.

1900sPalaceHippodromeFriarsGate187.jpg

 

c1900. Patten Lane, giving access to The Eagle & Child Public House.

1900sPattenLanetheentrytoTheEagleChildwestofBridgeStreet.jpg

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Ditto to all the above and thanks from me too Algy.

 

Re: the Domans Lane ones although (as you know) I have seen them before new time I see them again I start to ponder. I always wonder what it was like around there before it got to the delapidated state shown in your pics.

 

Maybe it was the same, maybe it was even worse but hopefully it was once better as like you probably remember from my other posts my GGG Grandad and his family lived in Dolmans Lane around 1833 and my GG Grandad was born there when his parents they lived there too.

 

If only we could turn back time and ask our ancestors eh as I bet they would have some tales to tell and without doubt it would make us all grateful for what we have these days... but then again maybe not and perhaps despite what they had to put up with perhaps they were actually happier and more content than people of our 'modern day' lifestyle :?:wink:

 

Guess we will never know though

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Algy - seems pointless posting the same thing on every lot of pictures,so, simply, excellent stuff and keep posting them

 

Happy days

Harry, perhaps I have my 'dim' head on, but not sure what you mean - if you are saying why don't I just post all of the pictures one after another, the problem is that we are only allowed to post in batches of ten per post, also take Bridge Street I have over 70 photos and I need to keep a check on where I am up to or I would be at risk of showing the same ones over again, pleased that you are enjoying them though.

PJ, A large amount of the photos were taken by Thomas Birtles, others by unknown amateur photographers.

The following was copied from a Warrington Museum webpage, I have checked out their copyright statement regarding the following and as long as the images are not used commercially or for personal financial gain I am not infringing on the copyright.

 

BS920birtles2.jpg

Thomas Birtles was born in 1832 and after training at Warrington School of Art became a professional photographer. His business flourished from his studio on the corner of Legh Street and Sankey Street. His work was of very high quality and in 1895 he was made a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society. He died in 1914, but the firm was carried on by his son until 1951. Warrington Museum has over 1000 original Birtles photos.

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Algy - I read it at Harry saying he always comments positively on every thread of yours so maybe it get tedious to read but it's deserved so here's some more praise anyway.

 

Sorry if I'm putting words in your mouth Harry!

:idea: Thank's for switching my light on :wink: and apologies to Harry, I did say I was probably being a bit 'dim', and yes I agree, it is nice to have appreciation shown though as it demonstrates that I'm not 'boring the pants' of everyone! and not wasting my time.

Tracy I have just replied to your querie on 'Latchford Mill' on the History section.

:) .

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Warrington Museum has over 1000 original Birtles photos.

 

then why aren't these scanned and available online to everybody?

 

To all you local lurking councillors out there..... stop picking litter and counting butterflies and do something useful and get these photos out into the public domain...... what use are they sat in boxes in town??

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then why aren't these scanned and available online to everybody?

 

To all you local lurking councillors out there..... stop picking litter and counting butterflies and do something useful and get these photos out into the public domain...... what use are they sat in boxes in town??

 

 

I agree.

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