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MSC 12


algy
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New Transporter at the River Bollin. I presume this would have been a temporary structure is there are no records referring to this bridge.

z0293_NewTransporterattheRiverBollin.jpg

 

Now that's what you call a barrow load!.

z0292_Navvywithbarrow.jpg

 

Navvies huts at Acton Grange, to accommodate the men and their families working between Moore Lane and Chester Road at Lower Walton.

z0291_NavvyHutsatActonGrange.jpg

 

Navvies manhandling a steam traction engine up or down the banking.

z0290_Navviesmovingasteamengineupabank.jpg

 

Navvies at Work on the Northwich Road Swing Bridge, the bridge had been built then the canal excavated under the bridge span.

z0289_NavviesatWorkontheNorthwichRoadSwingBridge.jpg

 

Teams of Navvies at work on the bottom of the Canal.

z0288_NavviesatworkonthebottomduringconstructionoftheManchesterShipCanal.jpg

 

Human Navvies and Mechanical Steam Navvies at Work on the Manchester Ship Canal.

z0287_NavviesandSteamNavviesatWorkontheManchesterShipCanal.jpg

 

Mr Platt's yacht the "Norseman".

Samuel Platt was one of the directors of the Manchester Ship Canal Company. His steam yacht 'Norseman', carrying his fellow directors, led a procession of vessels along the Ship Canal on its opening on New Year's Day, 1894. The Canal was officially opened by Queen Victoria in May of that year.

z0286_MrPlattsyachtNorseman.jpg

 

Moore Lane Work on the Manchester Ship Canal.

z0285_MooreLaneWorkontheManchesterShipCanal.jpg

 

The Mission Hall at Marshville on Frodsham Marshes.

z0281_MissionHallMarshvilleFrodshamMarshes.jpg

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I often wondered how they built the swing bridges over the canal Algy.

 

And now I know the answer thanks to you.

 

It never occurred to me that the bridges were put there and the canal excavated undearneath afterwards. I bet not many people knew that either.

 

My other half has just seen your latest pics (he had no idea about the bridges either by the way) and he sighed in a sort of way which said 'how on earth did they do all that day in and day out' followed by the simple words of "Tough Guys and not like many of todays workers .... and damn clever and logical too. "

 

So many people probably do not realise what went into the building of the canal or other things of that era. Maybe they couldnt care less (or think they couldn't like I used to think) but once you start to 'see' it becomes a fascinating and very addictive old world out there.

 

And a damn site more interesting that modern day 'world' that's for sure :lol:

 

Algy you should start another book of images and info about today's workers and buildings being built... in 100 years time they will probably just laugh out loud and say where 'yep that's when things started to go wrong'.... just look how they did that and how long it didn't last :lol:

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Look at the photo of the guy with the big barrow load of soil. Someone tell me his legs don’t look they’ve compressed while his arms stretched buy those big loads. :D

 

 

Bill :)

 

OK I'll tell you..

 

Looking where his knee is in relation to his hand I'd say he's in proportion. His are virtually at the same level as yours or mine would be if we pushed/pulled our shoulders down slightly Bill.

 

Go on try it and prove me wrong B)

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