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Where were these cottages?


algy
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Only a guess with the telegraph pole in the centre....telegraph cottages.

GG, knowing that you have a good knowledge of the Warrington area I am not going to say that they are not known as 'Telegraph' cottages until you say where they were situated, I know these cottages under another name, that name being the name of the person that lived local or in one of them?. :blink:

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Once again - no idea. However, I must correct Cleo, the Cottage Homes was an orphanage not a reform school. My farher and his sister were raised there until they were turned out at fourteen with nothing but a paper bag holding their belongings.

Stall, I think you are the same age as myself so I would think my dad would have been a similar age to yours, he was born in 1913 and he and three of his sisters were brought up there also and as you said, dad was turfed out with next to nothing and sent labouring on a farm at Moss side Moore where he slept rough in farm outbuildings with other Irish farm workers, he did have a mother but all but one of the children were taken away from her and sent into Padgate Cottage Homes when my Grandad who was an engine driver at Dallam shed had a bad accident in the early 1920's and was unable to work and with no money coming in, threatened to kill grandma who was pregnant, himself and all the children, he was restrained sectioned and spent the rest of his days in Winwick hospital until he died in 1968. I'm very bitter about the whole situation as none of their family would neither help them financially or take the children. Perhaps your dad and your aunt knew my dad?.

Sorry about wandering off topic folks!.

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Hope the folks will forgive us Algy, but had to respond. Dad born in 1912, mother died in flu epidemic, father stoker who was never home (sorry Asp.) Dad left Cottage Homes at fourteen and walked to Altrincham where his sister, who had been gone a year, had found a job in 'service'. It took him four days living rough. Found his sister but she could only give him a slice of bread - first food he'd had in four days. Managed to get taken on at Kearns Engineering as a sweeper. Was doing better, sleeping under the benches, until one of the fitters caught him eating sandwiches out of the trash and he had to go before old Kearns. Here's one of those cruel 'rich people', Kearns listened to his story and instead of firing him, he made him an apprentice and found him a room and gave him a raise to cover it. He ended up as one of the best 'fitters' I've ever known.

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Hope the folks will forgive us Algy, but had to respond. Dad born in 1912, mother died in flu epidemic, father stoker who was never home (sorry Asp.) Dad left Cottage Homes at fourteen and walked to Altrincham where his sister, who had been gone a year, had found a job in 'service'. It took him four days living rough. Found his sister but she could only give him a slice of bread - first food he'd had in four days. Managed to get taken on at Kearns Engineering as a sweeper. Was doing better, sleeping under the benches, until one of the fitters caught him eating sandwiches out of the trash and he had to go before old Kearns. Here's one of those cruel 'rich people', Kearns listened to his story and instead of firing him, he made him an apprentice and found him a room and gave him a raise to cover it. He ended up as one of the best 'fitters' I've ever known.

Tell you what Stal, everyone whinges and moans about the present state of affairs in the UK today, they would not have survived as those youngsters had to in those days, it was a matter of pick yourself up and do whatever it took to keep alive, was not uncommon for people to fall down in a hedgerow and fall asleep from exhaustion and never wake up and it wouldn't even make the local newspaper. They were hard days and pray to god they never return!.

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It just shows Algy, it's not government money or 'programs', it's personal strength, integrity and effort that is the basis of success. Both of my sons, in school papers, placed their grandfather as the person they most admired. I guess I should feel slighted, but I don't.

Mom was a mill girl who learned sign language as part of her job. Considering their beginnings,I bet that both of them would have been surprised if someone would have told them that they would end their days in a cemetary in Port Arthur, Texas.

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And don't worry about going off topic. Fascinating to read, but correct when you say folk wouldn't mange these days.

Thanks Peter.

Anyhow back to topic - where are the cottages in the photo, with it not going too well, heres a small clue, study the black & white half timbered building, surely someone will recognise it as it is still there today!.

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Arrgh... well done GG

 

I'd looked at that picture so many times and knew I'd seen that black and white building before. Even though I walk past it nearly every day it still didn't click in my little brain :oops::lol:

 

As for 'pidgeon bank' or 'Jimmy Swintons' cottages.... I'd never heard of them until now. Nice one Algy :D

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