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algy
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What was on the banner algy?

Cleo if i tell you that i shall have literally given you the answer.

Lt, no not Grappenhall.

What I shall give you is that you are on the right side of town!, and that there is something unique to that area in the photo.

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Isn't the white building the Thelwall (Pickering Arms) Arms (?). Looks like the place that we used to walk to down Weir Lane and over the penny ferry, for a drink on a warm summers night. That was my first thought.

Sorry Stal, that is definitely the Old plague house in lower wash lane, Latchford. Here's a photo of the "Pickering arms" at Thelwall - well before your time though.

ThelwallthePickeringArmsasseenfromFerryLane.jpg

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Ah well, memory warped by the sands of time I guess. I seem to remember the pub being nestled back, more away from the road, kinda like the house in the picture. Have I got the pub name wrong? The old place with the Thelwall city plaque on it.

The "Pick" has this inscription carved i a beam on the gable end - "In the year 920 King Edward the Elder founded a city here and called it Thelwall"

 

Here's the "Penny" ferry you would have used, again a bit before your time,

 

ThelwallPennyFerry2.jpg

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There was said to be a tunnel between the Plague House and Christ Church which was still there at the time the house being demolished.

 

Anyone know if that is actually true and if so has the other end been filled in ? Ok so the last question is a bit daft as it wouldn't lead anywhere now but maybe the opening is still there :oops:

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Well I never !!! I believe it's the same boat! I think I paid tuppence, but that may have included a penny for my bike. Does it still operate? Do you still have to ring the bell to summon the boatman from his cottage?

Stal,

The Ferry still exists today due to a law that made provision for the residents of Thelwall retaining their right of way to cross the River Mersey, the original Ferry was down a small cobbled track on the right just as you enter Ferry lane and behind the old Post office, when they excavated the canal the loop of the River Mersey became isolated and no longer of use to the village, a new ferry was provided to cross the MSC thus allowing the villagers to access Eea lane (or Eye lane as it is known today) on the north side of the canal, this would be the lane that you would have walked down to access the "Penny" Ferry.

I believe it is not manned continuously nowadays but has a time table on a board stating when the Ferryman will be in attendance, his hut is there, and I'm afraid I don't know how much the service costs, I shall find out for you.

 

Position of the original Ferry.

1882OriginalMerseyFerry.jpg

 

Position of replacement Ferry.

1907ThelwallFerryMSC.jpg

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Only just seen this. I used to live in Wash Lane.

 

There is an excellent picture of the Plague House in the Cantilever Chip shop.

I believe that was another building that got knocked down by mistake.

Is it one of these Baz?

Early photo.

LatchfordthePlagueHouseinWashLaneBuiltin1656.jpg

 

Later example.

LatchfordthePlagueHouseinWashLane.jpg

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Only just seen this. I used to live in Wash Lane.

 

There is an excellent picture of the Plague House in the Cantilever Chip shop.

I believe that was another building that got knocked down by mistake.

Is it one of these Peter, I apologise god knows why I originally called you 'Baz', Sorry!.

Early photo.

LatchfordthePlagueHouseinWashLaneBuiltin1656.jpg

 

Later example.

LatchfordthePlagueHouseinWashLane.jpg

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There was said to be a tunnel between the Plague House and Christ Church which was still there at the time the house being demolished.

 

Anyone know if that is actually true and if so has the other end been filled in ? Ok so the last question is a bit daft as it wouldn't lead anywhere now but maybe the opening is still there :oops:

 

Dizz, I don't think there would have been a tunnel between the two buildings, as the Plague house was built about 1656 and Christ Church in 1861, I honestly can't see the point of building a tunnel from the church to an old house at that time?, I think it is one of these urban myths but quite happy to be proven wrong. :wink:

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Dizz, I don't think there would have been a tunnel between the two buildings, as the Plague house was built about 1656 and Christ Church in 1861, I honestly can't see the point of building a tunnel from the church to an old house at that time?, I think it is one of these urban myths but quite happy to be proven wrong. :wink:

 

Aww cant you try to prove me right instead for ease and speed :lol:

 

There is a mention of the tunnel on the WG (2006) from an elderly lady who rented it and lived there from 1850 to 1957 before it was knocked down.

 

She says "There was a blocked-up tunnel that led to the Christ Church". A grandson (her's ??) also says "My sister went part of the way down the tunnel with some friends but they got scared and came back.".

 

BUT... I've just read the info contained in the Chester and North Wales Architectural, Archaeological, and Historic Society's - Journal of 1885 which is now available online and out of copyright and no mention of a tunnel there adn they would have mentioned it.

 

Maybe it was dug after then if indeed it really did exist. It's going to frustrate me now. Damn :lol::P

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Here is what the journal says as it may be of interest to some. I never knew how Wash lane came to have it's name.

 

Taken from a journal dated 1885 (non copyright as long as not used for commercial purposes apparently)... ps NOT my typos they must be errors from scan transcription.. I corrected the more obvious ones but some still remain

 

1.— THE PLAGUE-HOUSB, WASH LANE, LATCHFORD

 

As this is one of the best-established of our Warrington traditions,

and as it lies within the confines of that elastic and irregular limit known as the '* municipal borough,"

I have chosen to giro it precedence in my page of Local Sketches.

 

The Plague-House stands about one mile from the centre of the borough,

in its Latchford division, and upon the line of road which is said to have been the highroad from

north to south prior to the erection of the bridge over the Mersey at Warrington, in 1495.

 

As its name of Wash Lane imports, this road was liable to

occasional inundation, rendering it impassable to passengers on foot

except by the stepping-stones (tripping-stones) shown in the vignette.

 

The stream of water is now contracted into the limits of the brook

which runs on its western side, and empties itself into the Mersey

about 200 yards from hence, at a point where tradition says

the Mersey was alone fordable.

 

The date of 1650 is carved upon one of the timbers of the front of

this house, so that the cases of Plague which occurred here must have

been at or near the last appearance of the disease in England,

viz., 1664-5.

 

The coping-stone at the north-west comer of the garden or court-

yard is now in the Warrington Museum, and is faithfully represented

below our present sketch. At one extremity of this coping-stone a

square cavity has been formed, 5 inches square and 2 inches in depth,

in which the tradition runs that the money paid for provisions

and other necessaries, during the time of their dire suffering, was

steeped in vinegar by the plague-stricken inmates prior to its being

touched by the townspeople.

 

The tradition had long exbted that those who died of the Plague here

were not interred in the consecrated ground of their parish of Grappenhall,

but were rapidly buried in the field known as the firoom? Field, which is immediately behind the Plague-House.

This field is glebe land, and some labourers digging there

in 1843 are said to have come upon three human skeletons,

covered with a flat ashlar stone, without inscription or mark of any kind.

On the 10th of July, 1852, in company with a medical friend,

I made an investigation on this precise spot, and by means of an

iron probe ascertained the existence of a large stone about two feet

below the surface On laying it bare, it proved to be a thick slab of

red sandstone, rough from the quarry, 5 feet 1 inch in length and

2 feet 3 inches broad, with one extremity rounded, and broken across the middle.

 

Beneath it we found the bones of the pelvis and lower extremities of a

male human being, and near the pelvis the skull and lower jaw.

It was clear that in the investigation made by the farm labourers,

in 1848, the slab had been broken, and the bones beneath,

with the exception of the head and lower extremities, removed and lost.

 

In the parish register of Budworth, under the date of April, 1647,

the names of several are recorded as having died in this part of the

county of Chester from the Plague, but who were buried at the village

or hamlet of Bamton, two miles distant from Budworth, although no

consecrated ground existed there. Unfortunately, however, the pariah

registers of Grappenhall afford us no similar information.

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