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Lest we forget -


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In the summer of 1940, Britain was saved from invasion by RAF fighter command - 15th Sept is Battle of Britain Day.

I am totally ashamed to say that I had forgotten :oops: .

I'm sure I don't have to remind anyone that a great number of people lost their lives during that devastating period, most were young men barely old enough to grow hair on their faces and were not given the opportunity to grow old and whinge and moan as most of us seem to do nowadays. :(

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The chief architect of this victory was Air Marshal Dowding, who organised RAF Fighter Command prior to the war and integrated radar into a rapid response system. Sadly, he didn't get due recognition imo, but was packed off to Washington soon after the victory. As for "the few", whilst not in any way diminishing their bravery and skill, it was a team effort - just a pity we can't summon the same team effort in protecting the integrity of our national territory today. :cry:

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Thank God there was no elf and safety then. Used to enjoy day-time air raids as we dashed out of the class-room and into the air raid shelters. Those at night were almost as good as if you spent a lot of time in your anderson shelter, you didn't have to go to school next day.

 

Happy days - and just perhaps, happy nights.

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With respect Harry, understandably they were your childhood memories no doubt your mother and other adults would have been at best worried out of their minds, at worst terrified for the safety of us youngsters at that time, I'm just a bit younger than you and only have limited memory recall of the war although I do remember being bundled under the stairs on a couple of occasions, I think the most vivid recollection was walking St Mary Street on VJ day waving a union flag and walking smack bang into a lamp post resulting in a huge bruise on my forehead and having the bruise rubbed vigorously with butter when I arrived home, no sympathy given or expected there then.

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Absolutely right Algy. Shortages; rationing; apprehension, etc; but for children it was adventure. Would just add that there was something rather nice among the gloom in being couped up with your family group in your own tiny candle-lit air raid centre. Togetherness type of thing,altough no doubt nostalgia has a part to play in that.

 

But back to the thread and the pilots. Pardon the pun, but would we rise to the same heights if it happened today? Modern pilots are indeed brave but it must have taken a special type of courage to go out time and again in those death-pits.

 

Happy days

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I think the most vivid recollection was walking St Mary Street on VJ day waving a union flag and walking smack bang into a lamp post resulting in a huge bruise on my forehead and having the bruise rubbed vigorously with butter when I arrived home, no sympathy given or expected there then.

 

 

I'm not surprised there was no sympathy, considerin butter was rationed. :D

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Your quoting "the blitz" folks, which ironically, is what saved the RAF from defeat. If the Luftwaffe had kept to it's original tactics of bombing the fighter airfields and radar stations, the attrition rate may have seen off fighter command; even though we were (with women working at the factories, unlike the Germans), producing aircraft at a greater rate. Yet aother gaffe by Hitler, who ordered the bombing of our cities, following an RAF raid on Berlin. :shock:

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I think the most vivid recollection was walking St Mary Street on VJ day waving a union flag and walking smack bang into a lamp post resulting in a huge bruise on my forehead and having the bruise rubbed vigorously with butter when I arrived home, no sympathy given or expected there then.

 

 

I'm not surprised there was no sympathy, considerin butter was rationed. :D

 

Not where we receive our supply from, my granny, mum's mum used to make it. :wink:

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Am not old enough to remember any of those things but do remember the stories that my father in-law used to relate off his experiences as an RAF electrician during the war.

 

After listening to some of the tales I often wondered how the aircraft managed to get off the ground let alone fly and fight the opposing aircraft.

 

As a side note remembrance day this year is quite interesting. written down, the time of the silence will occur at 11am on the 11th day off the 11th month of the 11th year. or 11.11.11.11.

 

Something that will not happen again for a hundred years.

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