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The PREFERRED pronunciation of OFTEN


Jerry
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When I was in middle school, eons ago, a teacher impressed upon me that the T is silent in the word OFTEN. To say OFF TEN is to be illiterate. So over the years I heard it spoken in the illiterate way more than not. Finally this last year, 2010, I didn't ever hear it spoken without the T egregiously grating on my ear. I give up. I just hope the word appears somewhere in THE KING'S SPEECH, and he says OFF TEN. I can't argue with the King's English.

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"I can't argue with the King's English".

 

Neever can we cock, cos we a'nt got one. :wink: Interesting thought though. When we do eventually get a King, will the Queens English then become the Kings English?

 

Where did the teacher get it from that the letter T is silent in the "spoken" word often?

 

All the very best to you Jerry, on this Yuletide morn. :wink:

 

Quick Edit.

Can't believe I am sat here google bombing the Queens/Kings English. :wink::D

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i wonder if it a derivative of the word oft. if so then i would think that the T would not be silent.

 

however coming from what was once lancashire half the time you needed a translator just to understand the simplest statement.

 

H being the most common letter that seemed to be missed out at the beginning of words.

happen would be appen and often would be offen

 

"appen offen doowit" was a phrase it took me much head scratching to figure out when i first heard somebody say it. mind you i were a young slip of a la at the time and the phrase was spoken at the speed one normally associates with the asian continent so it came out as nearly all one word.

 

so i suppose it is all a matter of where you were dragged up as most dictionaries will quote both ways of saying often.

 

oh and a happy holiday to all.

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"I can't argue with the King's English".

 

Neever can we cock, cos we a'nt got one. :wink: Interesting thought though. When we do eventually get a King, will the Queens English then become the Kings English?

 

Where did the teacher get it from that the letter T is silent in the "spoken" word often?

 

All the very best to you Jerry, on this Yuletide morn. :wink:

 

Quick Edit.

Can't believe I am sat here google bombing the Queens/Kings English. :wink::D

I remember as a lad and prior to 'Lizzie' ascending the throne, Miss Charles at St. Thomas's banging it in to us that we should speak the king's english, she did'nt do a great job on me as I'm sure you have noticed my puncuation is rubbish. :oops:

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I've always said OFFEN and have never pronounced the 'T' :? None of my family say the 't' either although I seem to recall my mum saying it with the 't'. We all pronounce the word garage as 'garridge' but my mum used to say gurra'je.

 

So pronunciation may/may not be passed down from parent to child either... and how hard is it to type it the way you actually say it :oops::lol:

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Thanks folks for the input. There's them that want to speak posh and them that want to speak anti-posh. I'm not a joiner, hence my dilemma. One of my English teachers was much amused by the way "Did you eat?" "No, did you?" comes out frequently: Jeet? No, Jew? Fifty percent fewer words, huh?

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Dizzy: re: the word garage

 

One of my teachers said it's definitely a french word and we won't find that pronunciation of the letter "G" before than particular word was adopted into English. Could be. Gara jee seems to be an extremely francophobic way to say it.

 

When I was in Korea teaching English pronunciation a student asked me if "SU" as in SUGAR, was the only time "SU" sounds like "SH". I said, "maybe". She replied, "Are you sure?"

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Dizzy: re: the word garage

 

One of my teachers said it's definitely a french word and we won't find that pronunciation of the letter "G" before than particular word was adopted into English. Could be. Gara jee seems to be an extremely francophobic way to say it.

 

When I was in Korea teaching English pronunciation a student asked me if "SU" as in SUGAR, was the only time "SU" sounds like "SH". I said, "maybe". She replied, "Are you sure?"

 

Another French word is Menage as in Menage a trois. :wink:

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Not as shocked as I was when I googled the three foreign sounding words :lol:

 

Anyway, I also googled Genesis 16 (I presume you didn't mean track 16 of music albums of the same name).

 

Was a bit worried again after googling as the links returned said 'Passage Lookup' :oops::lol::oops: but I clicked it anyway... and all was revealed.

 

Shall I edit my own post once I have submitted it :lol::lol:

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