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Should kids have a tipple?


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Not according to the Health Czar; who given low death toll from swine flu, now seems to have time on his hands to tell parents NOT to get their kids used to alcohol. Meanwhile, opponents cite the French approach of introducing youngsters to responsible drinking. Alas, it appears to be an Anglo-Saxon problem, we just can't drink, we have to drink to get drunk. :shock:

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it is the royal we.

that special one that includes the whole population apart from the person uttering it :P

 

an interesting statement though as it implies that some people do not have to drink to get drunk. :?:shock:8)

 

as for drinking i had my weekly alcohol intake last night, 2 pints of bitter shandy. Wheeeee :lol::lol::lol:

 

sadly no longer have the tolerance for alcohol that i once had (lack of practice i suppose) eight pints and a hogie on the way home was a regular event when i was a lot younger. eight pints now and i would be in intensive care with alcohol poisoning :cry: but i can honestly say that i do not miss it one bit.

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Common sense says children should have no encouragement to drink,

 

On the one hand they may like it and turn out to be drinkers. On the other, I can say that I had half a cigarette 69 years ago

and have never touched another once since.

 

So to misquote Shakespeare, If alcohol be the food of love, give them excess of it, and thus the appetite may sicken and thence die".

 

Happy days

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Forbid your children to drink and there is a good chance they will do it behind your back.

Allow them some in moderation and hopefully they will not abuse it.

Most of us find out the hard way of how much we can tolerate.

 

:roll:

 

I completely agree Gary (for once :lol: )

 

I allow my son the odd drink on certain occasions and having been allowed it he's realised that it's not so exciting after all....and even better the bottle of low strength lager he had on holiday way back in May made him puke and he felt really ill all night....and he's never asked for any since :wink:

 

Personally I think the culprit may have been the whole pot of hot salsa dip he ate at the same time but I didn't tell him that :wink:

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Forbid your children to drink and there is a good chance they will do it behind your back.

Allow them some in moderation and hopefully they will not abuse it.

Most of us find out the hard way of how much we can tolerate.

 

:roll:

 

Have you???? :lol:

 

Yep - club 18-30 holiday many moons ago - beer, wine and lots of Ouzo!

Never again!

:roll:

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Good question! Each society has different ideas in kids drinking. Unfortunately our societies expect young ones to drink with their friends. Or at least in my opinion that is what I see.

 

When I was growing up my parents would occasionally have a drink on a Saturday night, just one. They didn't go out and drink, they didn't have wine with their meals. But I am still an alcoholic.

 

Why? Nature or nurture? No idea - I used to ponder this when I first got sober. I do not anymore. It's a fact of my life and I just move on.

 

I am all for parents teaching children the responsibility of drinking, maybe by having a glass of wine at supper. I know as a parent you cannot tell your children not to drink ( or they will to access).

 

So after rambling through all this I have to say Good Question - no answers. :wink:

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I am sure we all have our own anecdotal responses to this issue.

I never went in a pub until I was old enough and never drank anything alcoholic other than cider prior to that. I then went through a period of quite heavy drinking and frequently drove after consuming what would, in the breath test era, be illegal but which was OK then provided you didn't get caught or, if you were, could put on a good act of being sober.

Now I hardly drink at all, don't particularly like wine, quite dislike beer but drink it occasionally to be sociable and really dislike spirits.

But it all proves nothing.

I imagine the chief medical officer has access to the statistics and if they show more problem drinkers started early then he is probably right to issue his warning.

Cheers!

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The younger generation has much more money in their pockets these days and that coupled with cheap drink prices and it?s bound to happen. In my late teens I was unfortunately the bread earner in the family so unlike my mates, my drinking was restricted to what I could realistically afford and justify.

 

I think that if the age limit for alcohol were to me moved back to something like twenty-one as it is in the States, then a slightly more mature attitude to drink might come about.

 

Bill :)

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The younger generation has much more money in their pockets these days and that coupled with cheap drink prices and it?s bound to happen. In my late teens I was unfortunately the bread earner in the family so unlike my mates, my drinking was restricted to what I could realistically afford and justify.

 

I think that if the age limit for alcohol were to me moved back to something like twenty-one as it is in the States, then a slightly more mature attitude to drink might come about.

 

Bill :)

 

I agree with you Bill. Plus stop these late,late night clubs.

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Not according to the Health Czar; who given low death toll from swine flu, now seems to have time on his hands to tell parents NOT to get their kids used to alcohol. :shock:

 

Presumably he is making this recommendation because parents have been and still are introducing their children to alcohol. Children are watching how their parent?s behave/misbehave and copying them believing that it is simply ?normal? behaviour.

 

After attending a seminar recently on the impact of alcohol on the health of all ages and listening to an eminent Liver specialist at a North West Hospital, a local Police Chief Constable and an NHS Director I was surprised to find out how young teenagers are dying as a direct consequence of heavy drinking. Whilst at the other end of the spectrum the OAP are doing the same for different reasons. The social impact is extremely wide and far-reaching from policing costs, which we know only too well in Warrington to the chaos in the A&E. Alcohol, is simply very cheap and easily available and people do not realise or understand what it does to them.

 

binge-drink-ALAMY_148837t.jpg

 

If we are encouraging children to drink then we must also make them aware of the consequences.

 

I firmly believe that we don't even realise the consequences ourselves of what drinking can do to our bodies. Just ask yourself how many of your friends regularly get drunk in your company and if they are in the company of your children what sort of example is that?

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Lymmparent states a good approach

My Mum and Dad told us if we wanted to drink, they'd prefer us to do it at home where they could see we were safe. Took every last little bit of fun out of the idea..... worked a treat.

 

same applies to smoking.

 

 

If there were more youth clubs and places for youngsters to go to where there was some supervision, this too would alleviate the problem.

So far the government , police and other do gooders have done little to create such a set up, but have discouraged supervisors because of the stupid applicaation of anti paedophile laws.

 

Some common sense is needed and HMG have little of this. they only see the end product and do nothing to remedy the cause --probably beacuse it is too difficult for their tiny brains to tackle.

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Eag; never heard of a generalisation? History records a high level of drunkeness in Britain by a majority or sizable minority since at least the middle ages. Just as "generally" our French cousins have tended to have a more responsible approach to alcohol. Now that isn't to say that the French never get legless, or that all Brits do. But you only have to visit Faliraki etc, to see which Nationality is exporting this culture. :roll:

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