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Energy price hike.


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And to think that a few years a go all the tree huggers were saying that nuclear power was the most evil thing on the planet. Now many of them are actively touting it as an emissions free energy source.

 

If they hadn't forced the Sizewell B public inquiry to last 3 1/2 years and cost many millions, effectively stopping dead all plans for further nuclear capacity, we'd already have enough on stream to meet the UK's CO2 commitments in full!

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...and if we'd stayed in the nuclear power game on a commercial basis, maybe we'd have got clean nuclear fusion working by now.

 

As Geoff said, the UK's virtual exit from new nuclear capacity building in the 1980's - and the R&D effort which would have accompanied it - has brain drained us to the point where we now have to get the FRENCH to build us our next generation of reactors!

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Guest tonymailman
but is that waste unmanageable? many of our experts have left Warrington for other shores helping sort out their nuclear waste. Maybe they could be enticed back?

 

What experts ????????? :?::?::roll:

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but is that waste unmanageable? many of our experts have left Warrington for other shores helping sort out their nuclear waste. Maybe they could be enticed back?

 

What experts ????????? :?::?::roll:

 

I'm afraid that's classified information, but they do stand out at night and they don't need a reading lamp when they are in bed. :wink:

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having signed the official secrets act, how long does it stay in force?

 

if our experts have gone abroad are they not still covered and as such cannot do any work that contravenes it. :?:wink:

 

I'm not sure but once signed I'd have thought for life. You're probably right in that they can't divulge work that they have done but that surely doesn't stop them using the technical knowledge and experience for another employer. I imagine but don' know that the nuclear industry have agreements in place between countries as to what you can and can't do.

 

My IT contract with the Software Consultants, Fraser Williams, prevented me from joining a client for up to 6 months after I left a company unless I had FW's approval. I imagine that nuclear companies have more extensive and detailed contracts for employees to sign. I know that when I applied for a computing job with BNF the checks were the most extensive I have ever had so no doubt the exit process from the company is equally tough.

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True but although some people do call me surreal I haven't yet tried tree hugging but I am a member of the Warrington Nature Conservation Forum so that's pretty close. I must propose that we all finish our next meeting with a good old-fashioned tree hug.

 

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Anyway if we are to resolve the energy crisis then we do have to change our approach to making energy, however we must look out for the vulnerable members in society. Ever since I was at school we've been told that our natural resources are scarce so it makes sense to me to focus on renewable ones. Such development may well have additional associated costs, it can't be done for nothing.

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If we are to resolve our energy crisis we need to stop throwing our money away on windmills and start building some real power stations. :roll::roll::evil:

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The time has come to stop crying over spilt milk and start doing something positive. Saying we shouldn't have done this or that in the past will not help us in the future. 8)8)8)

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Energy prices are realated to use, not to affordability: thus Geoff, the poorest will suffer (as usual) disproportionally as a result - I already know of elderly folk, who are frightened to put their C/Heating on for fear of the bill - that's no way to live. :twisted: As for hugging trees. no, they should be out planting them - loads of them - to absorb excess CO2. As for us making cuts in immissions - a drop in the ocean, when matched against the US and China. Yes. we seem to be experiencing extreme weather fluctuations - so, get prepared for them and adapt to the change in climate - cos frankly, it's already too late for us to avoid it. :shock:

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Here we go again CO2 is not a pollutant climate changing devil, it's plant food. Without it we wouldn't be here. What extreme weather fluctuations are we talking about here? Oh yes, weather. That's what weather does, it fluctuates. We have warm dry years, cold dry years, warm wet years, cold wet years. Windy times, quiet times. The problem is that our "leaders" are bent on spending money we haven't got trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist (AGW) rather than a problem that will exist very soon (energy generating deficiency) :roll::roll::roll:

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Calm down Asp; I'm with you on this one - I merely cite the green perspective as the worst case scenario, and IF we are getting more droughts and floods than we used to (which is not a proven fact), we should prepare and adapt to such weather variations - like building on higher elevations etc; cos IF there is a grain of truth in the climate lobby, it's too late anyway - bit like telling a bloke with terminal lung cancer to stop smoking! :wink:

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