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Major new discovery of more Roman Silver


indy
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:shock: Well the story continues and today yet another piece of the Roman jigsaw was found when i uncovered yet another very rare Roman silver republican coin dating back to at least 121bc

( date to be confirmed shortly)

For the first time in 2100 years this coin has seen the light of day once again...... :shock:

 

Images and a film of the discovery will be available shortly ........

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:D Here is the official expert identification confirming my initial identification and dating

:shock: images/film will be posted in the next 24 hours .......

 

Dear James,

A very nice specimen, and great to have another coin from the same spot. It is a denarius of Marcus Vargunteius, dated 130 BC (Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage 257, 1). The obverse has the helmeted head of Roma, with the heavily ligatured legend MVARG, together with a barred X (the value-mark of the denarius). On the reverse is Jupiter in a quadriga, with the legend ROMA. Keep them coming!!

I'm afraid that I've made no headway with your stone carving as yet, but I keep trying.

Hope you are keeping well.

All the best,

David.

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Indy I really enjoyed your latest video, good content, production and compact which illustrates the process well. Like the moody nature in part with the glance over the shoulder as you walk away. The display of the coin is well done and the video would be an excellent introductory topic for a school lesson. Well done.

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Indy I really enjoyed your latest video, good content, production and compact which illustrates the process well. Like the moody nature in part with the glance over the shoulder as you walk away. The display of the coin is well done and the video would be an excellent introductory topic for a school lesson. Well done.

 

Indy just watching the mid day news and there's a WW2 bomb in a field like the one you've been driving around. Be careful out there. :lol:

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:D Glad you enjoyed the film Geoff ... filmed just last night and edited together over a few hours.

The films will become even more interesting as the finds are revealed to the cameras for the 1st time after laying in the ground for anything up to 2000 years or more 8)

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:shock: Hi Eagle,

I tend to carry my cameras with me at all times when out searching, this way im assured of capturing that moment of discovery in a genuine way.

Obviously there can be times where the find is made before the camera is switched on and then it sometimes has to be rediscovered just for the camera, but that is quite rare.

:D

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Nice one Indy :wink::D

 

Wow.... :D It's amazing that a coin which is over 2000 years old still has all it's detail so clear and visible. I've got an old roman coin but can hardly make it out :cry:

 

As already mentioned it would be great if all your finds were on display somewhere so we could all see them and talk to you about them.

 

Perhaps you and Gary could have an 'Indy/warr world wide' archaeological finds open day :D:wink:

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:shock: Peter, the coin size is actually about the size of a modern 1p !!!!

 

8) Observer, yes they are thought to have made coins at Widerspool during the Roman occupation of Britain, however all of the silver coins that i am excavating are minted when Rome was a Republic hence the coins being known as Republican silver coinage and were brought to this country when the Romans 1st arrived.

 

Most date from between 252bc - 2bc. So why are these coins being found over here? because they contained a much higher silver content than the imperial coins being minted here during the Roman occupation of Britain so they were collected or hoarded as they could be used in the future to buy more for your money !!!

 

Dismayed, like gold coins, coins made of a high silver content resist the acids in the soils that eat away at copper and bronze coins, hence they survive much better over time !!

 

Having said that, to discover just one of these coins in this area is rare indeed, i have now recovered 8 of them already ...... I will be holding a series of one day exhibitions starting in the new year where you will be able to come and see for yourself many of these ancient treasures and any other treasures recovered between now and then :P

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Dismayed, like gold coins, coins made of a high silver content resist the acids in the soils that eat away at copper and bronze coins, hence they survive much better over time !!

 

Having said that, to discover just one of these coins in this area is rare indeed, i have now recovered 8 of them already ...... I will be holding a series of one day exhibitions starting in the new year where you will be able to come and see for yourself many of these ancient treasures and any other treasures recovered between now and then :P

 

Look forward to your exhibitions Indy.... make sure you give us all details nearere the time :D:wink:

 

Sadly my roman coin is not on the scale of yours and definately isn't silver or gold :cry:

 

I found the very old email earlier from the chap who kindly tried to identify it for me and he said he believed the obverse side to show the Emperor LICINIUS 1st. ( AD 308 - AD 324) and the reverse side to show "Campgates" ( not a Roman Fort as I thought :oops: ) You will probably know him as hes a metal detector bod too :wink:

 

That's all I know about it ... I also have a cobble of the Roman Road that runs through here and no I didn't pinch it from the school... as most of that finished up in skips along with the propective covering that was put over it :roll::evil: ... mine is from someones back garden a few years ago :P:wink:

 

I wish I had your job as it sounds great fun, never a dull day eh :D

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:shock: True observer it could, but the amount of coins being found at the site and the actual coins contained are a classic make up of an early Roman hoard.

The opinion from a well known Roman expert who has been confirming the actual identity of each coin strongly believes that the coins are the result of advanced Roman forces first arriving to scout the area ..... coins deposited for safety but never recovered for whatever reason :roll:

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:o The Roman invasion that started in 43AD. They didn't arrive here in this area until approx 60AD but would have been in possession of Republican coinage as a form of payment as at that time there was very little coinage being produced on the shores of Britain.

 

Republican coinage remained in use until the late 1st century when mints were now more common in Britain producing imperial coinage.

 

At my sites that i am searching i find at least six republican coins for every 1 one imperial coin found. The earliest Roman brooch that i have recovered is a 'Hod Hill' type that was produced around 60AD so possibly lost by one of the 1st Roman people to arrive in the area. Most of my finds are from the 1st to early 2nd century and not much from the 3rd century.

 

BROOCH3.jpg

 

horse.jpg

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