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What to do about Bob?


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Bob Mugabe is clearly a naughty boy (actually old man); who's taken a leaf out of the EU Eurocrats book by refusing to accept the verdict of his people. :shock: So now we've got a round of hand wringing by the global political class, who are clearly impotent to do anything about it. :roll::wink: PS: and he's got no oil either! :wink:

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Hopefully the African congress will complete the job and finish him off one way or another.

 

Doubt it Geoff, a number of their members don't exactly have a human rights record to be proud of.

 

He is propped up by the military and the police, if the leaders of those forces can be persuaded that when Mugabe ceases to be in power that they will be dangling from a rope or worse unless they cease to support him, their own self interest and survival instincts may encourage them to switch their support. Couple this to the removal by the UN of diplomatic immunity for Zimbabwean officials, there might be some progress in removing this terrorist from power.....a terrorist...or is that a freedom fighter :wink: who the UK helped to put in power.

 

Guess the alternative could be a laser guided missile that seem to be effective in taking out Taliban and Iraqis.

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This from The Times highlights the problem:

 

From Times OnlineJune 30, 2008

 

Robert Mugabe hailed a hero at African Union summit

Sonia Verma in Sharm el-Sheikh, and Philippe Naughton

Robert Mugabe was hailed a "hero" by Africa's longest-serving head of state as he joined his fellow leaders at an African Union summit.

 

"He was elected, he took an oath, and he is here with us, so he is President and we cannot ask him more," said Omar Bongo, President of Gabon since 1967. "He conducted elections and I think he won."

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This from The Times highlights the problem:

 

From Times OnlineJune 30, 2008

 

Robert Mugabe hailed a hero at African Union summit

Sonia Verma in Sharm el-Sheikh, and Philippe Naughton

Robert Mugabe was hailed a "hero" by Africa's longest-serving head of state as he joined his fellow leaders at an African Union summit.

 

"He was elected, he took an oath, and he is here with us, so he is President and we cannot ask him more," said Omar Bongo, President of Gabon since 1967. "He conducted elections and I think he won."

 

Deary me

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I have a good friend who fled Zimbabwe as a child due to the wise decisions of 'Bob' :roll: , according to him he is essentially a terrorist who gained power through violence and coersion *hardly a recipe for a healthy democracy - but i supposse he is hardly unbiased*, however he said very wisely that we should be very wary of deposing such a man without considering who might rise to power in his wake *Iraq too :roll: *, afterall who says the ''democratic'' oppossition will be the answer to the problem? He thinks it may better the devil you know in some ways for now until a real solution is solved, but he definately needs to go.

 

I also think it is important to remember that Zimbabwe is more than good old Bob, he is part of the system and he could represent deeper and more complex problems for Zimbabwe, the issues are more than one man, afterall he couldn't survive very long if he wasn't playing up to the 'right people', of course if we don't change the system, the next president who comes along who may have good intentions could be moulded and confined by the corruption of the system, as has occured so so many times in history.

 

Let's not make another neo-con mistake of simply blasting the bad guys and waiting for democracy to work its sweet magic, it's not magic, it's fragile and unique to every nation and state.

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Prior to the end of the cold war, tyrants were tolerated, as long as they were OUR tyrants, and in the game of global politics lesser evils were accepted in the interests of conquering the greater evil - balance of power was the name of the game. :? With the end of the cold war and the collaspe of the Soviet Empire, the US neo-cons believed they now had free range to exploit the globe, under the guise of democratisation, which meant regime change for any non-compliant dictators (eg Saddam) IF they had national resources worth exploiting (ie oil). :roll: To sustain this burst of US global domination it was necessary to get domestic opinion on side, so radical Islam became the bogeyman, even though the US had originally trained and equiped Al Quaida against the Russian occupation of Afghanistan. :roll: As for the African States, yes they are the products of a rapid colonial retreat, and unfortunately have led to Dictatorships like Mugabe's; however, in the world of trade and exploitation, democracy doesn't represent a major consideration. :cry::wink:

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