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Warrington's munitions history


Gary
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My ex mother-in-law ,who i never met, died very young & left young children behind after wartime service in the munitions factories at Risley. Apparently,she contracted some form of cancer from the stuff they were handling in the pre PPE days.

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2 hours ago, Davy51 said:

My ex mother-in-law ,who i never met, died very young & left young children behind after wartime service in the munitions factories at Risley. Apparently,she contracted some form of cancer from the stuff they were handling in the pre PPE days.

Yes my Mother in Law also worked there and said she cried every morning on the bus to Risley apparently the conditions were horrific. Her skin turned yellow due to the chemicals she handled in her section.

She had terrible breathing problems for the rest of her life after working there

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33 minutes ago, Davy51 said:

Exactly, Latch. I wonder if there has ever been compensation awarded to or offered to war workers whose jobs were very dangerous with hindsight.

I think back then it was a case of everyone doing their bit.

While my Mother in law was at Risley her husband was on the Atlantic (and then Russian )convoys. 

So I suppose it was all get stuck in and not to complain

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20 hours ago, Davy51 said:

I'll take my hat off to both of them .

The biggest pity about it all was that my father in law didn't even reach retirement age and so worked until he passed. And his Wife was virtually housebound for the last 10 years of her life due to to her health problems. So much for reaping the rewards of a hard fought life

 

 

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My father in law was an electrician in the RAF. He served his time at many satellite aerodromes around the country, even did a stint in the isle of man maintaining the bomber training lights. He always said that the night duty was the worst part having to run the generators for the temporary runways in all weathers.

surprisingly he lived well into his nineties as did most of my wifes family.

I do have to wonder if it was because of the war that people from that era seem to live to a ripe old age, diet and all that. Todays generation seem to peter out before they get close to retirement age.

Can't be the stress of modern life as to my mind living in a time when bombs dropping was commonplace would be a lot more stressful.

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