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Renewable Energy - Lymm Dam, Mersey Weir


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Presume any flow of water can turn a turbine, but whether sufficient to be cost effective, I wouldn't know.  Think we need to look a bit closer at "renewables"; according to Countryfile, wind turbine producers are being compensated for switching off supplies to grid, due to an excess of supply - figure that one out !

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There is also plenty of water coming over Howley Weir which might be useful. There seems to be a problem with politicians getting behind renewable energy though & i can really imagine in say 50 years time ,when gas & oil is running out, that we will still be in the same situation as we are now. I know it may not be popular but my only vision of the future is nuclear power.

 

This thread sounds familiar.

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Watched a prog once, which showed a huge hydraulic ram, which is lifted by water pressure during off peak periods, then released to force water through turbines when peak hour demand kicks in. So it seems there is a capacity to store excess energy in the grid, rather than paying wind farms not to supply it.

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Yes well that does make some sense because of the much greater head of water that a canal has but it's still not an ideal solution because it's still somewhat weather dependant.

 

Even if we pulled out all the stops and put hydro schemes into every waterway, it would still only produce a small fraction of the countries demands and leave us more vulnerable during drought conditions. We need a solution that doesn’t depend on sunshine, wind OR rainfall and that's environmentally sustainable.

 

Such a thing hasn't yet been created but I'm confident it will be at some point in the future.

 

I'm working on it don't rush me!

 

Bill :)

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Maybe of interest to industrial archaeologists. Thornley's corn mill at Warburton had a Swiss made water turbine installed in 1907,28BHP off a 7 foot fall.Sometime in the 70s the rotor was lifted out for a look.The bearings still carried the fitter's scraping marks so it was put back and remained in use until demolition of the mill.

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Re.AGRs.Read the report on Three Mile Island. PWRs are scaled up ship propulsion plant. The characteristics required of such plant are not necessarily these required desirable for electricity generation.

 

Several nuclear powered vessels are electric powered, i.e. the steam produced drives a turbo alternator which produces electricity to power electric motors which drive the propellors. My point about the popularity of AGRs remains. There must be some drawbacks to the design which puts people off.

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