Jump to content
Eagle

Koran

Recommended Posts

Pedants are men who would appear to be learned, without the necessary ingredient of knowledge

 

Oh dear Cleo, You seem to get in a right strop when someone posts a joke on your religion, you can give it out but you can't take it :wink:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An Englishman, an Irishman and a Scotsman got into a taxi.

 

The driver takes one look at them and says,"Sorry gentlemen I am a Muslim, I can't take a joke".

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From a well known Islamic Website......

 

Rules of Joking in Islam

 

Some people joke too much and it becomes a habit for them. This is the opposite of the serious nature which is the characteristic of the believers. Joking is a break, a rest from ongoing seriousness and striving; it is a little relaxation for the soul. ‘Umar ibn ‘Abd al-‘Azeez (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “Fear joking, for it is folly and generates grudges.”

Imaam al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “The kind of joking which is forbidden is that which is excessive and persistent, for it leads to too much laughter and hardening of the heart, it distracts from remembrance of Allaah, and it often leads to hurt feelings, generates hatred and causes people to lose respect and dignity. But whoever is safe from such dangers, then that which the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to do is permissible for him.”

Sa’d ibn Abi Waqqaas said: “Set a limit to your jokes, for going to extremes makes you lose respect and incites the foolish against you.”

The amount of joking should be like the amount of salt in one’s food.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Do not laugh too much, for laughing too much deadens the heart.” (Saheeh al-Jaami’, 7312)

‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: “Whoever laughs too much or jokes too much loses respect, and whoever persists in doing something will be known for it.”

So beware of joking, for it “causes a person to lose face after he was thought of as respectable, and it brings him humiliation after esteem.”

A man said to Sufyaan ibn ‘Uyaynah (may Allaah be pleased with him), “Joking is not right, it is to be denounced.” He replied, “Rather it is Sunnah, but only for those who know how to do it and do it at the appropriate time.”

Nowadays, although the ummah needs to increase the love between its individual members and to relieve itself of boredom, it has gone too far with regard to relaxation, laughter and jokes. This has become a habit which fills their gatherings and wastes their time, so their lives are wasted and their newspapers are filled with jokes and trivia.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “If you knew what I know, you would laugh little and weep much.” In Fath al-Baari it says: “What is meant by knowledge here has to do with the might of Allaah and His vengeance upon those who disobey Him, and the terrors that occur at death, in the grave and on the Day of Resurrection).

Muslim men and women have to be inclined to choose righteous and serious friends in their lives, who will help them to make good use of their time and strive for the sake of Allaah with seriousness and steadfastness, good and righteous people whose example they can follow. Bilaal ibn Sa’d said: “I saw them [the Sahaabah] jokingly pretending to fight over some goods, and laughing with one another, but when night came they were like monks.”

Ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) was asked, “Did the Companions of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) laugh?” He said, “Yes, and the faith in their hearts was like mountains.”

So you have to follow the example of such people, who were knights by day and monks (i.e., devoted worshippers) by night.

May Allaah keep us, you and our parents safe on the Day of the Greatest Terror, those to whom the call will go out on that great Day:

“Enter Paradise, no fear shall be on you, nor shall you grieve”

[al-A’raaf 7:49 – interpretation of the meaning]

 

Got to be 'avin a laff!!!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
From a well known Islamic Website......

 

Rules of Joking in Islam

 

Some people joke too much and it becomes a habit for them. This is the opposite of the serious nature which is the characteristic of the believers. Joking is a break, a rest from ongoing seriousness and striving; it is a little relaxation for the soul. ‘Umar ibn ‘Abd al-‘Azeez (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “Fear joking, for it is folly and generates grudges.”

 

Imaam al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “The kind of joking which is forbidden is that which is excessive and persistent, for it leads to too much laughter and hardening of the heart, it distracts from remembrance of Allaah, and it often leads to hurt feelings, generates hatred and causes people to lose respect and dignity. But whoever is safe from such dangers, then that which the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to do is permissible for him.”

 

Sa’d ibn Abi Waqqaas said: “Set a limit to your jokes, for going to extremes makes you lose respect and incites the foolish against you.”

 

The amount of joking should be like the amount of salt in one’s food.

 

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Do not laugh too much, for laughing too much deadens the heart.” (Saheeh al-Jaami’, 7312)

 

‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: “Whoever laughs too much or jokes too much loses respect, and whoever persists in doing something will be known for it.”

 

So beware of joking, for it “causes a person to lose face after he was thought of as respectable, and it brings him humiliation after esteem.”

 

A man said to Sufyaan ibn ‘Uyaynah (may Allaah be pleased with him), “Joking is not right, it is to be denounced.” He replied, “Rather it is Sunnah, but only for those who know how to do it and do it at the appropriate time.”

 

Nowadays, although the ummah needs to increase the love between its individual members and to relieve itself of boredom, it has gone too far with regard to relaxation, laughter and jokes. This has become a habit which fills their gatherings and wastes their time, so their lives are wasted and their newspapers are filled with jokes and trivia.

 

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “If you knew what I know, you would laugh little and weep much.” In Fath al-Baari it says: “What is meant by knowledge here has to do with the might of Allaah and His vengeance upon those who disobey Him, and the terrors that occur at death, in the grave and on the Day of Resurrection).

 

Muslim men and women have to be inclined to choose righteous and serious friends in their lives, who will help them to make good use of their time and strive for the sake of Allaah with seriousness and steadfastness, good and righteous people whose example they can follow. Bilaal ibn Sa’d said: “I saw them [the Sahaabah] jokingly pretending to fight over some goods, and laughing with one another, but when night came they were like monks.”

 

Ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) was asked, “Did the Companions of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) laugh?” He said, “Yes, and the faith in their hearts was like mountains.”

 

So you have to follow the example of such people, who were knights by day and monks (i.e., devoted worshippers) by night.

 

May Allaah keep us, you and our parents safe on the Day of the Greatest Terror, those to whom the call will go out on that great Day:

 

“Enter Paradise, no fear shall be on you, nor shall you grieve”

 

[al-A’raaf 7:49 – interpretation of the meaning]

 

Got to be 'avin a laff!!!

 

Joking is an interesting topic and difficult to paint with one broad brush. Biblically speaking, joking itself is not regarded as sin, although in some instances, it certainly can be. Proverbs 18:21 tells us that “the tongue has the power of life and death, and those who love it will eat its fruit.” James 3:3-12 compares the tongue to a bit in a horse’s mouth, a ship’s rudder and a fire. The tongue is a powerful thing and words can either bring great life or great hurt. There are ways to joke that edify. “A cheerful heart is good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones” (Proverbs 17:22). The Psalms are full of references to laughter, which is what good joking produces. But there is also a way to joke that is demeaning and harmful, and we are called to “not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen” (Ephesians 4:29).

 

Our words should always honor God and communicate that we value that which He has made. The best way to know whether our joking is bordering on the sinful is to seek the Holy Spirit and ask for His conviction. He can make us sensitive to when a joke is appropriate and when it may not be. If there is any doubt in our minds, or if our consciences are being pricked by our joking, it is probably best to forego it. There is also the issue of making others stumble, which we can easily do with jokes that we may feel are perfectly innocent, but which others see as offensive or hurtful. Our liberty should never be exercised at the expense of another’s conscience (Romans 14:13-17).

 

Occasional jokes and jesting, if they are appropriate, are probably for the most part innocent. But there are those who make jokes so often that they can hardly say a sentence without it containing a joke of some sort. This is hardly the most appropriate lifestyle for a Christian, however, as we are told to “live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world” (Titus 2:12). As with all “gray areas” in the Christian life, seeking God’s wisdom regarding our speech is the most profitable way to go (James 1:5).

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Credit where it is due,

 

A very good responce Cleo, But sadly alot of people who prefess to be Christian, have never read the Bible.

 

Its hard to read the good samiriton, And then relate that back to the retrick Obs comes out with. The UK is a Christian nation in name only :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those last posts of Baz's and Cleo's only serve to demonstrate how some religionists suck the humour out of life.

 

Eagle's joke made me laugh and, like some of the best ones, it relies on the ambiguity and nuances of language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Religion of any kind depends on us living in an ideal world. Sadly we don't. So being neighbourly and understanding will have to suffice. Note the word "understanding". People can say things that others might find offensive, but perhaps these "others" need to take a look at themselves and ask if comments are a matter of life and death or just light-hearted remarks.

Sticks and stones springs to mind.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Religion of any kind depends on us living in an ideal world. Sadly we don't. So being neighbourly and understanding will have to suffice. Note the word "understanding". People can say things that others might find offensive, but perhaps these "others" need to take a look at themselves and ask if comments are a matter of life and death or just light-hearted remarks.

Sticks and stones springs to mind.

Wise words and my sentiments also, Peter, however im my view there are many factors and a fine dividing line as to when a single word or a statement will be construed as offensive by the individual they are aimed at, ie, that person may feel picked up on and have a past history of receiving insults even though they may have been delivered in a light hearted fashion, they may be in a mild state of depression at the time caused by external pressures, theirs or a member of their families health me be suffering, and many more influences that may cause what is seen by the person 'leg pulling or jibing' to retaliate in an aggressive manner. eg, one may use the term 'bastard' jokingly to a friend or work mate many times without provoking a negative response, catch them on an off day and their response may be very negative to say the least, and finally none of us like the term bullying but that is what we do when we individualy or collectively taunt an individual to the point where there reponses become apparently and repeatedly defensive, whether on a forum or otherwise.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, theirs two politically correct answers

I would rather say, sensible, adult and polite Lt, the term PC is a description of the practice of using speech that conforms to liberal or radical opinion by avoiding language which might cause offence to or disadvantage social minorities, although some of what Peter and myself typed may very loosely fit your interpretation, I would say that mine is intended to explain the reason for someones reaction to what we feel is light hearted forum banter. As the saying goes "Cap fits wear it!" :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
eg, one may use the term 'bastard' jokingly to a friend or work mate many times without provoking a negative response,

Quite right alg although I can't recall the term " you moronic bird brained whatever you are" being used all that much. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quite right alg although I can't recall the term " you moronic bird brained whatever you are" being used all that much. :wink:

Rare term of endearment used by Middle Eastern ladies to their pet budgies and parakeets!. :wink:

Joking apart that appears to endorse what I was stating, using the analogy - poke a stick at sick animal enough and you will provoke it into attacking you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 A sick animal?????????   Ye gods algy, are you in love?

:lol: :lol: :lol:  Thanks Eagle I have edited that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, theirs two politically correct answers

 

Well, theirs two politically correct answers

Kije. I don't do PC. Never have and NEVER will.

 

My opinion comes from the University of Life. Perhaps you should enrol and become enlightened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×