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By hook or by crook?

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The Trouble is, in a civilized, society, where we cherish our freedoms, Just because we don't like someone, or like what they do, and I don't like him either, We can deny someone else theirs. You cannot change the rules for one man. Sadly people will take advantage of free speech and our other freedoms.

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Think he fled Jordan to seek assylum here, which implies he thought this Country to be a place of safety. Then he proceeds to go out of his way to make it a very unsafe Country. So don't you think the host should decide who s/he has in his house? :unsure:

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The decent law-abiding citizens of this country must be left to fear actions created by this "Cleric" due to his human rights out-trumping those of the innocent.

There is basically no way this man will ever be deported thanks to our inclusion of the Human Rights 1997 incorporating the ECHR. How anyone except the Liberal Loonies can think this is correct is beyond me.

And still the Tories won't consider giving us a vote on membership of the EU/ECHR, that is why they will lose votes to UKIP, well mine at the very least (and my wife).

Absolutely bonkers the judges of this country whatever court you consider.

 

and just in case you missed it Kije.... answer Dizzys question:

 

"Just out of interest LtK ... do you think it's right that he's still in the UK and that we are paying to keep him safe just because he 'may' not get a fair trial if he is deported ? Surely he gave up any rights for that years ago anyway having followed the path he did"

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Quote from another forum, who's members to a man and women wish to do him harm!.

 

Seriously, what would be so difficult about abducting this turd of a human, loading him onto a C130, and "accidentally" dropping him off the rear ramp mid-Atlantic?clap-animated-animation-clap-smiley-emoticon-000340-large.gif

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wonder if the jordanian courts cold bring an actin against the british courts for defamation. They say they will not use evidence obtained by torture and our courts are basically saying they are lying. Now if that happens and it is found that the jordanians were telling the truth then there would be no problem with him being deported. :mellow:

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As I said I do not like him, but at the moment he has not broken any UK law. Which is something people forget.

 

I wasn't asking if you 'liked' him Lt I asked whether you thought it was right that....<scroll up to read my question again>

 

I have not forgotten about the 'not breaking any UK laws' bit as I mentioned it here

 

We might aswell have a big flag on our UK borders saying 'terrorists welcome and we will protect you blah blah blah AS LONG AS you have never committed any known crime or attrocities in the UK' :roll::evil:

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Was he ever charged with the offence Cleo?

 

If he was charged or not he did it and therefor broke a UK law.

And don't give me any more of your innocent until proven sh*te because it won't wash with me.

And here's something for you to ponder. It's gonna cost you taxpayers 5 million pound a year to keep him under surveillance.

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wonder if the jordanian courts cold bring an actin against the british courts for defamation. They say they will not use evidence obtained by torture and our courts are basically saying they are lying. Now if that happens and it is found that the jordanians were telling the truth then there would be no problem with him being deported. :mellow:

 

Now there's a thought Evils. :wink:

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Actually Kije he has broken a UK law. He entered Britain in 1993 using a false passport - that is illegal. :blink:

 

Maybe illegal but he and his family were then granted Assylum. They should have sent them all straight back there and then on the fist plane out :evil:

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Abu Qatada has been described as Al Qaeda's spiritual leader in Europe, the most significant extremist preacher in the UK and 'a truly dangerous individual'.

 

Since 2001, when fears of a domestic terror threat rose in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, Qatada has challenged, and ultimately thwarted, every attempt by the Government to detain and deport him.

 

Timeline of key events in his long-running battle against deportation:

 

1993

 

September 16 - The Jordanian father-of-five, real name Omar Mahmoud Mohammed Othman, claims asylum when he arrives in Britain on a forged passport.

 

1994

 

June - He is allowed to stay in Britain.

 

1995

 

March - Qatada issues a 'fatwa' justifying the killing of converts from Islam, their wives and children in Algeria.

 

1998

 

May - He applies for indefinite leave to remain in Britain.

 

1999

 

April - He is convicted in his absence on terror charges in Jordan and sentenced to life imprisonment.

 

October - The radical cleric speaks in London advocating the killing of Jews and praising attacks on Americans.

 

2001

 

February - He is arrested by anti-terror police over involvement in a plot to bomb Strasbourg Christmas market. Officers find him in possession of £170,000 in cash, including £805 in an envelope marked 'For the mujahedin in Chechnya'.

 

December - Qatada becomes one of Britain's most wanted men after going on the run from his home in Acton, West London.

 

2002

 

October - He is arrested by police in a council house in south London and detained in Belmarsh high-security jail.

 

2005

 

March - He is freed on conditional bail and placed on a control order.

 

August - The preacher is arrested under immigration rules as the Government seeks to deport him to Jordan.

 

2008

 

April - The Court of Appeal rules that deporting Qatada would breach his human rights because evidence used against him in Jordan may have been obtained through torture.

 

May - Qatada is granted bail by the immigration tribunal but told he must stay inside for 22 hours a day.

 

June - He is released from Long Lartin jail in Worcestershire and moves into a four-bedroom £800,000 home in west London.

 

November - He is rearrested after the Home Office tells an immigration hearing of fears he plans to abscond.

 

December - Qatada's bail is revoked by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (Siac) after hearing secret evidence that the risk of him absconding has increased.

 

2009

 

February 18 - In a landmark judgment, five Law Lords unanimously back the Government's policy of removing terror suspects from Britain on the basis of assurances from foreign governments.

It is ruled he can be deported to Jordan to face a retrial on the terror charges.

 

February 19 - Qatada is awarded £2,500 compensation by the European Court of Human Rights after the judges rule that his detention without trial in the UK under anti-terrorism powers breached his human rights.

 

2012

 

January 17 - European judges rule that the firebrand cleric can be sent back to Jordan with diplomatic assurances but he cannot be deported while "there remains a real risk that evidence obtained by torture will be used against him".

 

February 6 - Siac rules he can be released on bail, despite posing a risk to national security.

 

February 9 - David Cameron and King Abdullah of Jordan agree on the 'importance of finding an effective resolution' to his case, Downing Street says.

 

February 13 - It emerges that Qatada has been released on strict bail terms from Long Lartin prison.

 

April 17 - The cleric is arrested as the Government prepares to deport him to Jordan, with Siac president Mr Justice Mitting saying Home Secretary Theresa May has secured assurances from Jordan that it will 'bend over backwards' to ensure Qatada receives a fair trial.

 

April 18 - Qatada's legal team lodges a fresh appeal attempt with Europe's human rights judges, saying the Strasbourg-based court was wrong when it ruled that he would not be at risk of torture if returned. The Home Secretary insists the move is simply a 'delaying tactic' and claims that the appeal was made too late to be granted anyway.

 

April 30 - Al Qaida's North African branch, Al Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, offers to free British hostage Stephen Malcolm if Qatada is released by the UK. On the same day, then-immigration minister Damian Green says repeated failed attempts to deport Qatada have cost £825,000 in legal fees since 2002 and confirms that the bill will continue to grow.

 

May 9 - Qatada loses his attempt to have his appeal over deportation heard by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights, clearing the way for deportation proceedings to continue. The ruling is a narrow escape for Mrs May as, while they rejected the case, the panel of five judges also rules that Qatada's appeal on the night of April 17 was within the court's deadline.

 

May 28 - The radical cleric's attempt for freedom is blocked by Siac president Mr Justice Mitting as he denies bail, saying that to free Qatada on to London's streets would be 'exceptionally problematic' during heightened security during the Olympics.

 

August 9 - Qatada loses a fresh bid for freedom at the High Court, with the judges rejecting a 'gloomy prognosis' that there could be another year or more of litigation before a final decision is made.

 

October 10 - Qatada's appeal hearing, which will test the assurances offered by Jordan, is heard by Siac president Mr Justice Mitting, Upper Tribunal judge Peter Lane and Dame Denise Holt.

 

November 12 - Siac allows his appeal.

 

:evil:

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Was he ever charged with the offence Cleo?

Just because he has not been charged, doesn't mean that he's not morally guilty!!!

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Surely the rod was made for our own backs, when he was granted assylum in the first place? The idea that we can't deport immigrants to their Country of origin, cos they may suffer torture or capital punishment, would seem to rule out most of the world, including the USA. :roll:

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If they behaved themselves and refrained from committing criminal acts in their own countries they would be safe enough and have nothing to fear. As it is the UK readily welcome in the world's criminals and scum escaping punishment in their own countries. They are no angels. :blink:

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It would appear our shambolic open door asylum/immigration policy has killed a beautiful young woman near Manchester....

 

Some asylum seeking piece of Zimbawean scum drove the wrong way down the M62 in September while twice over the drink drive limit. He crashed head on into a car in which Rebecca Caine was a passenger. She was killed and he gets 8 years for causing death by dangerous driving...

 

This guy came to this country as an assylum seeker 10 years ago and had had previously been convicted of drink-driving and had been caught driving while disqualified on three occasions in the past as well as admitting fraudulently claiming to have held a full UK driving licence for 10 years, driving with no insurance and with excess alcohol

 

8 years.... he will be out in time for breakfast and back onto benefits while using the same loopholes used by Quatada to fight any extradition plans the government may have for him

 

This country really is a joke

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Before I knew he was an assylum seeker, I was of the opinion that he should have got life in prison. But as Baz says, this guy had form; and no licence or insurance. It would appear logical, that in cases of criminal activity (first offence), assylum status should be revoked. Had this happened in this case, the guy would have been in Zimbawe and the young girl would still be alive. :angry:

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