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Egbert

BA strike

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Hardly suprising indeed. Our ships very rarely carry anyone in excess of the minimum. In fact my present ship only has accomodation for one person above the minimum anyway! :shock::shock:

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Of course "manning levels" form part of contract agreements, most for safety reasons alone; but as we all know, safety is secondary to profit by bosses; hence Walsh and Co keep mithering to fly through volcanic dust clouds. :roll:

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Thats right Obs, move the goal posts. That, as you know, is a completely different topic. :roll::roll:

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No - this dispute originated over "manning levels" = safety = management attitude to safety = management attitude to volcanic dust. :wink:

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How can having up to 4 times as many cabin crew on board make an aircraft safer? At best it is simply more people to evacuate in the event of an emergency, at worst it is likely to lead to confusion over which crew member has responsibility for which emergency exit at what stage in the flight.

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Nope, at best (assuming proper standards of training), it ensures a higher ratio of trained personel to passengers, improving customer service (less waiting) and more control in the event of an emergency. Now, you can always forgoe this and book with El Cheapo Airlines and be treated like cattle and in the event of an emergency it's every one for themselves - yer get what yer pay for in the end. :wink:

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seems the strikes will go ahead after all..... BYE BYE BA....BYE BYE Cabin crew jobs!!

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They will get what they deserve, how much is Job Seeker's allowance these days?

Obs, will help them with a few quid for standing up to for his principles.

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Whatever the rights and wrongs of the BA dispute (and I don't pretend to know much about them) if I were in the Unite union right now I would be looking for another union to join. They have now cocked up two strike ballots. Tony Woodley can beat his chest on TV as much as he likes, ranting on about democracy, justice, etc, but the law works on technicalities and if he and his advisers don't know that by now they should not be running a union. These days, unions should be run by professionals - not by shopfloor workers!

 

Perhaps BA should be run by a professional :wink: and not an ex shop steward.

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Perhaps BA should be run by a professional :wink: and not an ex shop steward.

 

Walsh was hardly a "shop steward". When he was a professional airline pilot he became chief negotiator for the Irish Airline Pilots Association. He went on to become the CEO of Aer Lingus saving that airline from extinction before moving to BA. Don't they sound like professional qualifications to you? :roll::roll:

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Nope, at best (assuming proper standards of training), it ensures a higher ratio of trained personel to passengers, improving customer service (less waiting) and more control in the event of an emergency.

 

Evacuation procedures are very carefully worked out and each crew member responsible for an emergency exit knows exactly where they must be in order to operate the exit without obstructing the passengers way out.

 

So where do you envisage all of these spare crew to be situated during an emergency evacuation? Standing in the aisles shouting instructions? That'll just block the aisles and get more people killed. Or out of the way in their seats and the galley (which is where supernumerary crew are currently instructed to stay during an evacuation), in which case they're not adding a great deal to the whole evacuation process.

 

As for standards of customer service, how does having an off-duty crew on board (who also want fed) help to speed up a meal service?

 

BA have found to their cost that there simply aren't enough people willing to pay premium prices for higher crew ratios. That's why they are losing money and, if they are not allowed to change, they WILL go bust.

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?531 million loss announced this morning and Derek Simpson from Unite thinks BA are being "silly" for not agreeing to the union demands.....

 

bye bye BA

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When he was a professional airline pilot he became chief negotiator for the Irish Airline Pilots Association

 

Sorry SENIOR Shop Steward. whose philosophy is

"a reasonable man gets nowhere in negotiations".

 

He tried to prevent a strike on a technicality rather than negotiate.

 

He should resign before he cripples BA. :roll:

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His philosophy is correct. As for crippling BA it's the union that's attempting to do that :roll::roll:

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Strange, I've never noticed on any flight that the number of cabin crew exceeds the number of exits. :roll:

 

Not very observant then are you Obs?

 

The CAA minimum number of cabin crew on board and on duty is one per emergency exit. Or are you suggesting that every flight you've ever taken has been below legal minimum crewing levels - and that the unions have ignored this fact?

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Now you mention it, you could be right; as I've always made a point of counting the number of cabin staff, when wondering why it's taking so long to dish out the dinners - and it's often been less than the number of exits - but these wern't BA flights, so the staff probably "knew their place" and didn't complain! :wink:

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Now you mention it, you could be right;

 

Obs' euphemism for "Yes I was, as usual, talking utter bollix but it was worth a try."

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Seems the ultimate consequences of airline "competition" can be seen in the USA, where pilots are down to $16-20K PA, with some claiming food stamps and working two jobs. :shock:

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So 3,400 out of 11,000 eligible members - just 27% - have voted to reject BA's final offer. The vast majority - 73% - either voted in favour of the offer or didn't feel strongly enough about it to bother to vote.

 

And yet we look set for hundreds of thousands of people to have their travel plans and holidays ruined this summer.

 

Should a union vote have to acheive a certain percentage of the overall membership in favour to be considered to be a valid result?

 

After all, the idea of a quorum is hardly a new one.

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