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Paul Kennedy

Male primary school teachers in decline

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Does it matter that there are now many primary schools with no male teachers, many have been deterred by fears of being labelled as a paedophile. The trend is raising concerns that boys are growing up without an authoritative male role model in their lives given the breakdown in two parent families. Should more be done to encourage men in to the profession.........should there be positive discrimination with male only shortlists. :shock::wink::)

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I do not see why we shouldnt have positive discrimination with male only shortlists. I mean , in a round about way, we do already have them. You see lots of positions in papers and websites advertising along the lines of :-

 

"We welcome all applications, but would be particularly interested to hear from women, individuals from ethnic minority groups and disabled people"

 

So yes, it does go on.

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Agreed Rifles - One question though - is it really the fear of being labeled a pedo that is effecting their decisions or is it the low pay? Does anyone really know??

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Im not sure if the governments teacher training agency has got any evidence as such but, if i remember correctly, they were the ones banging on its one of the reasons why there is a shortage of male teachers

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If the latest news is anything to go by, schools have got too many teachers, head teachers and teaching assistants anyway, whatever gender they are.

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or is it the low pay?

 

It is possible for the most experienced primary school classroom teachers to earn ?60,000 per year....accepting that the starting rate is around ?21,000 per year.

 

As I recall when I was at primary school in the 60s, there were 5 female and 2 male teachers and a headmistress. Men tended to teach the final 2 years. Interesting to note that class sizes were high 30s, one year I think it was 42....and no classroom assistants...there was however a cane kept by the headmistress....and strict (ish) parents. :wink:

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When my son was at primary school in the early 90s the headmaster was on ?39000 pa, which was considerably more than I, doing a proper job (only kidding all you teacher types, wouldn't have your job for twice the money) was earning :wink::wink:

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I think the general mistrust of males around small children must have led to fewer men wanting to teach primary age. What a sad state of affairs. When I was at primary school, late 40s/early 50s, there were 2 male teachers. They were both ex-servicemen, very "hot" on discipline, and parents, in general, appreciated that. No one ever gave a thought to paedophilia because, just like now, it was very rare, the only difference being in the media reportage of any incidents. Men who worked with children were not, automatically, seen as potential threats.

 

Modern paranoia has led to ridiculous situations. I know of a Brownie pack that was desperate for a leader and on the point of closing. The father of one of the Brownies came forward and said he'd love to do the job as he was interested in children's welfare and development (as are teachers) and he had a lot to offer with ideas, commitment and experience as the father of 4 girls. They had to turn him down because he was - God forbid! - a man. The pack is now run by a lady - nominally - but he does all the planning etc., in the background, and he can't ever take a meeting himself, there must always be at least 2 women there with him. How paranoid is this world?

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Paul, to partly answer your question, it's a sad reflection of our society and how we think. It?s not just having an impact on primary schools but on sport?s clubs and even recruitment of school governors to a lesser degree.

 

Fuelled by press and media reports, exposing evil people and rightly so, we have become so suspicious of everyone that we believe that the bad is the norm?

 

Children especially at primary school have to have a safe environment with all the appropriate checks in place and schools work really hard to achieve this.

 

The young learners need good and effective male role models to inspire them. This is especially true for boys and even more so where this is not happening at home.

 

I can't really remember my Primary Schools days too clearly because my dad's career meant that we moved every two years due to promotion but they were happy ones.

 

I can though remember that I was inspired in my secondary school by all of my teachers for many and different reasons.

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It isn't the world that is paranoid Katie, it is this bloody country that is paranoid. Fuelled as has been said by the media and taken on by the PC and liberal elite that rule us, it has now got to a point where men are seen as a threat to everyone, not just kids. We are seen as a threat to paranoid women who want to be driven around in a pink taxi, we are seen as a threat to kids when men want to be teachers and scout leaders and god knows what else.

 

What we do need it proper sentencing of the scum that are known to mess with kids; they should be locked up for life, all of them, without parole. Not put in council flats overlooking playgounds. They have too many human rights and it should be put to an end now.

 

Maybe then, we can get away from this scary nonsense about there being a peado on every bus, next to every playing field and sat in every classroom

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What we do need are more men to train as Primary School teachers and prove that hey can teach well and be excellent role models for the children despite what people think?

 

It is a very rewarding profession and one where setting an excellent example in the classroom is what is required. There are many doing just that but simply not enough men.

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Geoff,

 

As you know, my business takes me into lots and lots of schools and I have over 400 schools as past and present customers. The lack of male teachers in primary schools is very very obvious when you see as many as I do. It is ridiculous and I personally would put a lot of it down to the PC brigade scaring blokes off from being a teacher.

 

I have tried many times to get my son to go into teaching, but he reckons it is more trouble than it is worth (and his girlfriend is a teacher!!)

 

Baz

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Baz J, yours is obviously a personal view and probably shared by a number of posters on this discussion forum however when I read out your comments to my son he looked puzzled.

 

He has taught rugby league for the Warrington Wolves Foundation in many Primary Schools throughout the Town over a number of years.

 

Like many sports coaches he wants the children to enjoy sport and all its benefits and he finds the experience very rewarding. He is not going to be put off by what the press may or may not say.

 

He is after all a profesional and not going to be put off a career in sport just because of what people may think. He like male primary school teachers take a professional approach and ensure that the appropriate controls and balances are in place.

 

I have not visited as many schools as you or him for that matter but I have taught in twelve over the last 8 months and tried to inspire the youngsters about business and their future.

 

My deliveries have been throughout the North West and my concerns are simply along the lines of:

. am I delivering the day's programme to the best of my ability?;

. are they understanding and enjoying the activities?;

. what tricky questions are they going to ask me?;

. will the teacher give me a good appraisal?

 

It has been a great learning experience for me. It's not always been easy and I have had to adapt especially during the first few lessons. It has on occasions been hard work, you certainly have to be prepared but it is definitely rewarding and worthwhile.

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Baz J, yours is obviously a personal view and probably shared by a number of posters on this discussion forum however when I read out your comments to my son he looked puzzled.

 

He has taught rugby league for the Warrington Wolves Foundation in many Primary Schools throughout the Town over a number of years.

 

Like many sports coaches he wants the children to enjoy sport and all its benefits and he finds the experience very rewarding. He is not going to be put off by what the press may or may not say.

 

He is after all a profesional and not going to be put off a career in sport just because of what people may think. He like male primary school teachers take a professional approach and ensure that the appropriate controls and balances are in place.

 

I have not visited as many schools as you or him for that matter but I have taught in twelve over the last 8 months and tried to inspire the youngsters about business and their future.

 

My deliveries have been throughout the North West and my concerns are simply along the lines of:

. am I delivering the day's programme to the best of my ability?;

. are they understanding and enjoying the activities?;

. what tricky questions are they going to ask me?;

. will the teacher give me a good appraisal?

 

It has been a great learning experience for me. It's not always been easy and I have had to adapt especially during the first few lessons. It has on occasions been hard work, you certainly have to be prepared but it is definitely rewarding and worthwhile.

 

Not sure what happened here?

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On a related issue I'm wondering are posters put off from even thinking about being a School Governors because of this so called 'Male Paedo' tag that BazJ talks of.?

 

There are many many vacancies to be filled in Warrington scools.

 

Again like teaching it is hard work BUT a very rewarding role in the community. It doesn't necessarily matter what your skills and experince are.

 

You will be at least a critical friend to the school and a at best someone whose skills and expertise can enhance the board. I'm sure that you will get a warm welcome, you will certainly receive training, help, advice and a CRB check :)

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