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A levels - are they getting too easy?


inky pete

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Employers will always judge new employees on how they find them, rather than what qualifications they appear to have. But in my own not inconsiderable experience of interviewing prospective employees I have found them to be considerably less educated than were my peers at the same age. Therefore, if I find they have A Levels and even Degrees, you can't blame me for coming to the conclusion that examinations have been "dumbed down."

You also can't blame me for not offering them a job!

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Therefore, if I find they have A Levels and even Degrees, you can't blame me for coming to the conclusion that examinations have been "dumbed down."

 

Isn't it true that examination is no longer a part of attaining a degree? It's now 100% course work.

 

I do know that in schools, Nursery Nurses in order to become teaching assistants are now being sent to College/University(1 day a week), coming out with degrees having not taken any exams. This enables them to take classes when fully qualified teachers are off sick or on courses etc. This of course saves the schools from paying out for supply teachers.

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Having looked at my eldest's work, the syllabus is not easier than my day (mid 70s), it is that it is now modular. With regards to employers and Degrees, most select by University and in the case of Oxford/Cambridge which are Collegiate Universities sometimes even refine it to a specific college for particular Degrees, and many are now looking for a Masters....or even an appropriate Doctorate.

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The syllabus may not be easier, but the module system cannot match the depth of knowledge provided by a traditional degree.

Credits for each module can be built up merely by copying reams of information from the internet and not necessarily by the person who is taking the degree. :roll::roll:

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I understand what you all are saying - but in this day and age everything is so narrow - that is the degrees and jobs are really specific. I think that is why the Uni's have turned to modules. :?:

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I have read all your comments. The real point is, whether examinations are used or not, whether the A Level is "easier" or not, the general standard of young person presenting himself or herself for employment has fallen. They can't spell, they have poor general knowledge, they are too ready to shrug their shoulders and say "So what?" and they have a lack of commitment. They are frequently clock-watchers and are unwilling to accept criticism, even when offered constructively.

I believe this is as much the fault of parents and (as I said before) the TV in the corner of the living room, as it is the education system.

But something needs to be done about it - and fast!

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The first thing that needs to be done is get the politicians out of the equation. :shock: Their interference and attempts at micro-management have created this farce in the first place - I notice they never try to micro-manage the Military, maybe fail to fund and equip them properly, but never interfere in something they know nowt about! :roll::wink:

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Not sure at what University the above research have based their analysis on the decline of Universities on but my wife who has worked at a local Red Brick for 30 years assure me that exams are still being set, marked and celebrated for Theoretical Physics. She gave me a look of amazement when I quoted the views of WWW posters.

 

On the other end of the spectrum my daughter has passed all of her GCSE's but I questioned what posters on here think of the easiness of the exams she expressed concern about those who had failed to get any. Just imagine working so hard for you exams, being told that they are dead easy and failing.

 

So she now has to decide which of the very esay 'A' levels to take, maybe if she read the contributions above she wouldn't even bothered. But then she's a lot smarter thans that and so are her mates.

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  • 2 months later...

Isn't it true that examination is no longer a part of attaining a degree? It's now 100% course work.

 

 

A friend of mine has just achieved a BA Honors degree in Early Years Teaching without taking 1 exam and completed it in a total of 120 days. :shock::shock::?

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Can you ask them

What entry qualification/experience did they require?

Which University they were at?

Was the 120 days consequtive?

Did they do any course work and was it assessed?

Was there any practical/experience that had to be done outside the classroom?

and finaly what career they are hoping to go into.

 

This is obviously very different from studying 'A' levels but it would be interesting to find out a bit more about this degree. It wasn't on off the internet was it?

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I assume that it was part of Chester as the presentations were last week in Chester City centre.

 

The 120 days were spread over 2 years I think.

 

They did course work obviously and it was continually assessed.

 

That's all I know except they did not sit an exam

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Hi Wolfie from what I can see on the University site this is normally a 4 year course, assessment is as follows

Your progress on the programme is mostly measured by continuous assessment with very few formal examinations. However, we are required to audit students? subject knowledge in certain areas before we can recommend them for Qualified Teacher Status, e.g. Maths, English and ICT.

 

Throughout the programme you will be assessed by a variety of methods including essays, folios of work (often including work undertaken in school), presentations, and observations of your teaching.

 

I'm not sure what experience/qualification are needed to be accepted on the course. It might be that your friend was exempt from doing some of the course because they could prove their competency in certain areas and therefore didn't have to do say the first year.

 

It might be that they still have to go on to do extra work before they can be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status.

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Makes you wonder if that is why teaching standards are not as good as they used to be :oops:

 

Saying that some GCSE subjects are now marked and assessed over the final two years of school life (year 10 / 11 ) but the kids do have to take a number of exams tests at specific intervals too.

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Makes you wonder if that is why teaching standards are not as good as they used to be :oops:

 

Saying that some GCSE subjects are now marked and assessed over the final two years of school life (year 10 / 11 ) but the kids do have to take a number of exams tests at specific intervals too.

 

Okay so we are now up to a 3 year course with 120 days teaching i.e. lectures. However what we also need to include is the studying/academic research done during that period, the amount of assisiting and teaching spent in the class room and the continuous assessment that this involves. The course work has to be completed and marked to a certain level for a pass to be obtained.

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I compile and present pub quizzes and make them even easier than the average pub quiz. At first I was astounded by the ignorance of young people. I've found that the young at this time lack the curiosity of previous generations. I've always maintained that curiosity is the biggest motivator in education and it's sadly lacking today, indeed some of the young who do my quizzes positively revel in wallowing in their ignorance. It seems it's now uncool to display any intelligence whatsoever. Last Sunday a couple in their early 20's only answered 5 questions correctly out of around 80 questions and seemed to be very proud in doing so. I would have slinked out of the back door of the pub in shame if that had happened to me at their age. Yes, I know that the ability to retain bits of trivia in the brain isn't a measure of intelligence but it makes you wonder if they've got the ability to retain anything at all in their pea sized brains.

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