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Keithy T

Lost Treasures 2

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Our series of Lost Treasures is being broadcast on 29 April for eight weeks. Mark Olly is the image of the programme and a very good one, but just a rare word for Phil Hirst our producer who has to keep it all in shape.

 

Now Phil is a Warringtonian too and did his masters at what was the Warrington Collegiate (now the Uni of Chester). It's my firm view that due to Phil's tenacity, enthusiasm and belief Lost Treasures will become a national institution once it hits the network.

 

As I said in threads about the first series, without people watching we don't have a show. I'll repost when I get the finalised viewing schedules from Phil when I meet him today for lashings of real ale in the ancient tradition of TV archaeologists. I do know that Grappenhall and Warrington will feature highly.

 

Repeated thanks for your support here and particularly to Gary for his welcome coverage in the tome. Lost Treasures Home Page

 

[ 06.04.2007, 12:49: Message edited by: Lost Treasure ]

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Peter thank you. It's Sunday April 29th (7.30) for eight weeks. The second one on May 6th looks at the Cheshire Cat with visits to Grappenall, Stretton and Warrington Museum.

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Shine a light it's now 5.30pm (the "let's have a cheese salad" slot) same date sorry viewers. In episode one, among other new discoveries, we find a Viking stone in my birth place in Wirral. Hey no jests please it's as old as me plus 1100 years since you might ask. Residents of Grappenhall might enjoy Mark's Cheshire Cat trail in episode two on May 6 - in case anyone fancies getting the old Morris Minor out for a spin.

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Not sure really. I think if the weeather's nice people go out and return around 5.30 so I guess we'll have to see. It's all about audience figures as you know. We did OK last time.

 

In ep 1 we are on the Viking trail and speculating what lies beneath a pub car park in Wirral. Although the archaeology is scant it's likely to be a Viking merchant ship which got stuck in the marsh. There's also Elsie Lloyd who is the last witness to Sutton Hoo. She was a little girl when she saw these guys digging and out came a Saxon King with the regalia we all know and love. Oh and a Viking hogback residing in a village garden. Imagine digging borders and finding one of those :)

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I'm sure that viewing figures will be fine, after all following the 1st series I am sure that people will be waiting for the new series. Viewing figures are unfortunately what counts these days in tv land as you are well aware.

 

From memory talking with Granadas F.T he was telling me that viewing figures of around 32% are very good indeed. I think that Locks & Quays series gets somewhere around those figures.

 

Good luck and best wishes for your new series

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Hi Tony,

Is there any particular reason why you don't watch these sort of programmes??

 

Just curious, nothing more.. 8)

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Originally posted by Lost Treasure:

It's Sunday April 29th (7.30) for eight weeks.

I read this, and read the change of time to 5:30

 

but nowhere did you say in the thread,

 

what channel?

 

I presume its CH4, but when i looked at the cable v+ program listings for tomorrow, i cannot see it listed at all, on any channel at either time?

 

 

Steven Dowd

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Forgive me for not coming on sooner to clarify time changes. 6 pm is now our proper time slot.

Viewing figures were 19% which is 4% above what we were expected to achieve. So we are punching the air Viking style. This Sunday we follow the Celtic trail of the Cheshire Cat from Wirral through to Grappenhall, Stretton, Pott Srigley and the Macclesfield Road to the Druid sanctuary at Buxton.

 

Tony, thanks for your comments and understand where you are coming from. TV is a funny game. I will share with you another dilemma of how to balance education with entertainment. I recall back in 1990, I was working for Liverpool Museum on the exhbition surrounding the Cuerdale Viking Hoard, Silver Saga.

 

This was a serious academic led exhibition and I was Press Officer. Happily targeting the broadsheets, I was approached by a production company for a Saturday morning kid's programme Wac 90 presented by one Michaela Strachan. This confused me. Predictably we were asked to wear horned helmets so that Timmy Mallet could bash us with his hammer. For the uninitiated, and correct me if I'm wrong Tony, but horned helmets were a Victorian myth and there is no archaeological evidence that a Nordic helmet ever bore horns in anger. Although figuring our appearance might get a few feet through doors we agreed to do it providing we could bring some real Vikings into the studio.

 

Regia Anglorum were recruited and we managed to compromise with them on modes of dress. All in all, apart from having to wear size 7 Viking leather wrapovers on size 13 feet, it all went OK and I even received a kiss from Michaela which was life enhancing and led me to an unprecedented desire for...more press coverage.

 

Fast forward 2007 and Lost Treasures 2. Thankfully we have full control up to the point of final edit what goes in the programme. As you quite rightly say Tony there can be no watertight proof that our conclusions are watertight. What we can do though is get across the message that research, academic debate and the hunt for our past is not the sole domain of academics. All the TV prog does is to promote a healthy interest to pursue history further. In the absence of much ancient history in the primary and secondary curriculum, programmes such as ours can play a role. For re-enactments we are using reputable research-led organisations.

 

Anyhow this wasn't meant to be a big post but I hope you enjoyed it. Thank you and good day :)

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Norse helemts NEVER had horns as you say ...... earlier Celt ones did however :D:P

 

ps - The Victorians did a LOT of damage to not only Saxon/Viking history but more so the medieval era, making complete fantasy out of real fact :roll:

 

[ 03.05.2007, 12:19: Message edited by: tonymailman ]

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Thank you for the clarification Tony as I must admit that I am bit out of touch with KS1 and KS2 History now but thankfully my cynicism is unfounded.

 

I'd also add my own Stuart period of interest to the list of Victorian fantasies in your PS. Never was a cleaner more sanitised civil war fought between those miserable yet righteous roundheads and the jolly but misguided cavaliers.

 

I am hoping Phil, our producer will join us for discussion at some point. But I hope I am not jumping the gun by suggesting that your own work and those of your friends in the societies could well help us in future progs if you were interested. Maybe take a look at us on Sunday?

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TMM, it was also Victorians who pioneered the modern study of medieval times, not least the painstaking work on charters, pipe rolls and other such documents, as well as beginning to rescue, say, the life of Edward the Confessor from hagiography to the study of the real man.Without them our past little discussion on Edward I would not have been possible! :wink:

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Good point and this aint a Victorian bashing session. The re-interpretation of history is an ogoing process and refects the priorities of the age. For example, Sir Thomas Malory defined our modern view of Merrye England back in the 15 c. In fact Victorian iconography is not a bad way of understanding why we want to overlay our view of ourselves on another age. In our century, Henry VIII is portrayed on TV as some kind of gangster by Ray Winstone. The recent Jane Austen series depicts late 18c England as some kind of Wags Boutique.

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Wonder if my name was put on the credits. I did a couple of runner days on the shoot. Mark said they were, but I not sure they will be. Wasn't expecting it.

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Originally posted by Goonerman:

TMM, it was also Victorians who pioneered the modern study of medieval times, not least the painstaking work on charters, pipe rolls and other such documents, as well as beginning to rescue, say, the life of Edward the Confessor from hagiography to the study of the real man.Without them our past little discussion on Edward I would not have been possible! :wink:

True ..... and as said it isn't a 'bashing' of the Victorians, merely a factual statement that a lot of the stuff they came out with was pure nonsense, but again as has also been said, a lot of modern day television interpretation of history leaves a hell of a lot to be desired :roll:

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One day we hope to be able to extend the series to the network and apply some more ideas for the further involvement of amateur historians and archaeologists to our understanding of the past. For the budgets that are available in regional TV, Phil Hirst and the team have done a great job.

 

Sadako, there are certain restrictions by ITV on what can go on the credits. Protocol if you will. If it's any consolation, I don't get on there either despite my pound of flesh but I'm sure you will agree it's a highly professional outfit which we're working for. Hope to meet you on location in a field soon :)

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Oh I am fully aware of that, that is why I said I wasn't expecting it. I'm not too bothered. I had a great time and can put it on my CV which is the main thing.

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Just remember Sadako - one day your name will be at the top - I do believe that it will and I am sure you are determined that it will. :)

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